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William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
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William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1, Chapter 29: in Caddo. (search)
. To gain a right of settlement in the Choctaw country, Granville McPherson should have taken to himself a Choctaw bride, instead of whom he has married irs. Star Hunter, of Oskaloosa, Iowa. Granville has fallen to his fate. How could an editor of the Oklahoma Star escape being run down, when a widow called Mrs. Star Hunter was in chase? Caddo, as might be expected from her origin, is radical, not to say revolutionary, in her politics. The Negroes and their Zambo offspring not being Indians, and having no part in the Indian system, the people of Caddo wish to change the whole existing order of things — the separate Indian nationality; the distribution of Indians into tribes and families; the exclusion of strangers from the Indian country; the abolition of Indian blood-feuds, despotic chiefs, and the common property in land. What do you want to have done by way of change? I ask a Negro politician. By way of change? replies the Black radical. Let us change everything.
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1, Chapter 30: Oklahoma. (search)
n experiment which the Franciscans tried in California. But the classification is too vague and weak for practical life, and is thrust aside by men who have to deal with living facts. These practical men know two Indian classes only- I. Wild Indians. II. Half-wild Indians. All the great families and tribes are wild: Sioux, Utes, Cheyennes, Arapahoes, Navajos, and the like. These are the Red men who have never been subdued and fixed. Pagan, predatory, and nomadic, these Indians coIndians. All the great families and tribes are wild: Sioux, Utes, Cheyennes, Arapahoes, Navajos, and the like. These are the Red men who have never been subdued and fixed. Pagan, predatory, and nomadic, these Indians count about two hundred thousand souls; and are the true Red men, unmixed with alien blood, untouched by alien creeds. The second class contains the smaller Indian families, who, from contact with White men, have been half-subdued and fixed: Mission Indians of California, Pueblo Indians of Arizona, Senecas in New York, Chippewas in Michigan, Winnebagoes in Nebraska, Choctaws, and Cherokees in Oklahoma, and their fellows everywhere. These Indians, mostly surrounded by White settlers, count abo