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Browsing named entities in Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for C. J. Ingersoll or search for C. J. Ingersoll in all documents.

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Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States. (search)
k. President Tyler, in an able message, placed the subject before the two houses and urged that the will of the people should be speedily carried out. Resolutions for annexation were introduced into the House by Mr. Douglass, of Illinois, Mr. C. J. Ingersoll, of Pennsylvania, Mr. Weller, of Ohio, Mr. Tibbatts, of Kentucky, and others; and in the Senate by Mr. Benton and others. These resolutions differed from each other in the measures proposed to accomplish the purpose. In the House, the resolution of Mr. Ingersoll, amended so as to exclude from slavery all territory north of 36° 30′, and further amended, was finally adopted January 25, 1845, by a vote of 120 to 97. In the Senate, Mr. Benton and others adhered to the Benton resolution and refused to concur with the House. Finally a compromise was effected by adding Mr. Benton's resolution to that of the House as an amendment. In this form the measure passed the Senate by a vote of 27 to 25, and was concurred in by the House