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Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Duncan N. Ingraham or search for Duncan N. Ingraham in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The blockade (search)
piled their bones along the shore — in fact, every harbor-mouth of the South was dotted with them. On the 31st of January, 1863, there took place a brilliant and famous attempt on the part of the Confederate naval forces in Charleston to break the blockade, when the ironclads Palmetto State and Chicora actually put out from their harbor and steamed some distance out to sea, these rams having engaged several strong Federal gunboats, capturing one and putting the others to flight. Flag-Officer Ingraham, the senior officer of the attack, was fully persuaded that he had broken the blockade, and upon his return to Charleston so reported to General Beauregard. The latter did everything in his power to force this claim upon the attention of foreign governments, for if the consuls of European nations at Charleston would have acted upon such representation, it would have been necessary for the Federal Government to have established a fresh blockade in accordance with the laws of nations.
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The actions with the forts (search)
o view, they preserve sights that inspired the men and women of the South with an intensity of purpose rarely exampled in history. In the upper picture is the famous floating battery built by subscription by the women of Charleston. Its guns were first fired in the attack on Fort Sumter that began the war. From that time forth every nerve was being strained by the Confederacy to put an ironclad flotilla in commission. South Carolina was conspicuous in its efforts to this end. Flag-Officer Duncan N. Ingraham superintended the navy-yard at Charleston and under his direction the Palmetto State and the Chicora were built. The keel of the latter was laid behind the Charleston post-office in March, 1862, and she was launched the following August. Five hundred tons of iron were required for her armor and the country was scoured by willing searchers for every scrap of metal that could be melted up. On January 31, 1863, the Chicora and the Palmetto State suddenly came down from Charleston
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
detached and actually embarked. Grant and Meade had their hands full in the military operations around Petersburg and Richmond and could not give much attention to the expedition. General Butler had more time at his disposal and proposed a plan for exploding close to Fort Fisher a vessel loaded with powder. This was bravely carried out by the navy but proved entirely futile. January 31, 1863. Confed. armed iron-clad rams, Palmetto State and Chicora, and 3 steamers, under Flag-Officer Ingraham, came down Charleston, S. C., Harbor, and attacked 3 vessels of the blockading squadron, the Mercedita, Keystone State, and Quaker City, damaging them severely, and capturing and paroling the crew of the Mercedita. 30 Federals killed and 50 wounded. February, 1863. February 1, 1863. Second attack on Fort McAllister, Ga. Confed. commander, Maj. Gallie, killed. Federal vessels retire without loss. February 2, 1863. Union ram Queen of the West ran by the Confed. ba