hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 56 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 14 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 8 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Ino or search for Ino in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 1 document section:

James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The Confederate cruisers and the Alabama : the Confederate destroyers of commerce (search)
their cargoes. Seventeen captures in all were made, of which two were ransomed and seven were released in Cuban ports. The Sumter finally found herself blockaded, early in 1862, in the harbor of Algeciras, Spain, by the Tuscarora, Kearsarge, and Ino. Her boilers were now worn out, and there was no opportunity to repair them. So the vessel was sold, and was turned by her new owners into a blockade-runner. This vessel, of all those available for the Confederate navy, alone seemed suited forot away, the Sumter had made eight prizes. On Nov. 23d Semmes cleverly eluded the Iroquois, then lying outside the harbor of St. Pierre, Martinique, and cruised to Gibraltar. There the Sumter was blockaded by the Tuscarora, the Kearsarge and the Ino. Semmes, seeing that escape was impossible, sold his vessel and disbanded her crew. Her prizes totalled fifteen, and Semmes was soon making another record for himself in the Alabama. The Florida was the first cruiser built for the Confederacy a