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William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves. 2 0 Browse Search
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William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves., Lecture I. Introductory remarks on the subject of African slavery in the United States. (search)
Lecture I. Introductory remarks on the subject of African slavery in the United States. General subject enunciated Why this discussion may be regarded as humiliating by Southern people other stand-points, however, disclose an urgent necessity, at this time, for a thorough investigation of the whole subject the results to which it is the object of these lectures to conduct the mind. the great question which arises in discussing the slavery of the African population of this country — correctly known as Domestic slavery --is this: Is the institution of domestic slavery sinful? The position I propose to maintain in these lectures is, that slavery, per se, is right; or that the great abstract principle of slavery is right, because it is a fundamental principle of the social state; and that domestic slavery, as an institution, is fully justified by the condition and circumstances (essential and relative) of the African race in this country, and therefore equally right.