Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for Irish or search for Irish in all documents.

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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
short life on the stage. When 1860 dawned, Dion Boucicault (1822-1890) and John Brougham (1810-1880) reigned supreme in American popularity, and they were both Irish. The former had yet to do his most popular and characteristic pieces, in which he won deserved success both as an actor and playwright: to read Jessie Brown; or, Dogies owes its form to The cowboy's lament, the origin of which has been mentioned, and it is sung to the same melody as its Old World original. The influence of Irish Come-all-ye's and of deathbed confession pieces is pretty strong on the cowboy songs as a whole. The term American ballads is better applied, not to the small, cording to the common way of speaking, just as Natty Bumppo pronounces it. His ven'son is still good English. His consait (conceit), ginerous, fri'nd, 'arth sound Irish, but that is as much as to say that they belong to the old, authentic vernacular; they cannot be made to serve as illustrations of any wanton perversity on the pa