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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 20 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 12 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 12 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 10 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 10 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 6 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative. You can also browse the collection for Irish or search for Irish in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 1 document section:

8)—these two regiments lost very heavily, more than eighty being killed or mortally wounded from each, while their supports, the 10th, 15th and 29th, with the 1st, 3d and 5th batteries, suffered more slightly. It was at this battle that the 9th (Irish) Regiment, under Lieutenant-Colonel Guiney, fulfilled the prophecy made by the Hon. Edward Everett in regard to this portion of our people. Their cordial sympathy warrants us in believing that if, on some hard-fought field, should the doubtful dfirst direct proposal looking toward the enlistment of colored men was in a letter from Governor Andrew to the Secretary of War, April 25, 1861, in which he says, Will you authorize the enlistment here and mustering into the United States service Irish, Germans and other tough men, to be drilled and prepared here for service? Schouler, I, 122. It is difficult to tell what these lines mean, which were underscored in the original letter, if they do not refer to the negroes. It was, moreover