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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 194 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 112 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 60 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 56 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 52 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 51 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 44 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 32 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 28 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 21 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Washington Irving or search for Washington Irving in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
ther she had ever read the works of Shakspeare. She said that she had seen some of the volumes; but that her neighbor Jenkins, or some such name, had read nearly all his writings! This woman and Shakspeare's room have been commemorated by Washington Irving. I ventured to press her still farther, by asking if she had ever read Irving's account of his visit. She had seen the book but once,—and that was while a traveller, to whom the copy belonged, went from the house to his inn and back againIrving's account of his visit. She had seen the book but once,—and that was while a traveller, to whom the copy belonged, went from the house to his inn and back again,—and yet she grew eloquent about the mighty Bard and the American who had rendered such gentle homage to his memory. The room is pencilled over by names, among which you will see those of many Americans. I think that I need not disclaim having added mine to the list: you will not suspect me of it. The church is an interesting old English church, which stands on the banks of the Avon. The yard is full of grave-stones, which are overshadowed by numerous trees. I walked round the church many t<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
he year he taught in the Law School as Judge Story's substitute. His social life varied this year little from what it had been during the two preceding. In the spring he visited New York with Prescott,—their special errand being to meet Washington Irving. In January he had many pleasant interviews with Dickens, who brought a letter to him from John Kenyon, and who was grateful for his kindness. Dickens's Life, Vol. I. p. 305. Late in August he met Lord Ashburton, who was then in Bostonoes Greene live now? Give him my love. He must write to some of us. Ever sincerely yours, Charles Sumner. To Lord Morpeth, at St. Louis, he wrote, May 25:— Prescott gave an account, doubtless, of our excursion to New York, to meet Irving. It was a most agreeable jaunt, which I enjoyed very much. Prescott was fairly Boz-ed. He amuses us not a little by his account of the doings and sayings to which he was a party. Mr. Everett has written me of the great kindness of Lady Carl
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 27: services for education.—prison discipline.—Correspondence.— January to July, 1845.—age, 34. (search)
volume of his edition of Plato published? How is Guizot's name pronounced? Is the Gui as in Guido in Italian, or as in guillotine in French? I detest the war spirit in Thiers's book. It is but little in advance of the cannibalism of New Zealand. What do you think of phrenology, and of animal magnet. ism? Eothen is a vivid, picturesque book, by a man of genius. What are you doing? When do you set your face Westward? I suppose Wheaton will be recalled; and I was told yesterday that Irving would be also, in all probability. . . . Ever thine, Chas. To Thomas Crawford. Boston, May 10, 1845. my dear Crawford,—I suppose you have not yet received the letter from the students. I believe they postponed it till you are known to be in Boston. They confine their order to the limits of their pockets, and propose a bust only. I propose a statue. Quincy will make an admirable statue in his robes as President of the College; and the Library of the College is a beautiful hall.