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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 58 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 54 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 52 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 42 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 42 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 32 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 28 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 26 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 26 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Italian or search for Italian in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 3: the corner --1835-1839; aet. 16-20 (search)
first house from Washington Square. The Italian master was a son of the venerable Lorenzo da Ponte, who in his youth had written for Mozart the librettos of Don Giovanni and Le Nozze di Figaro. Four languages, English, French, German, and Italian, Julia learned thoroughly; she spoke and wrote them throughout her life correctly as well as fluently, with singularly pure accent and inflection, and seldom or never was at a loss for a word; nor was she less proficient in history. For mathema home, because, as he told Mr. Ward, he had found that the climate was favorable to the growth of the tomato, that most wholesome of vegetables. The Ward boys delighted in visiting Father Corne, and in hearing him sing his old songs, French and Italian, some of which are sung to-day by our grandchildren. Father Corne lived to a great age. When past his ninetieth year, a friend asked him if he would not like to revisit Naples. Ah, sir, replied the old man, my father is dead! Our mother
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 14: the peace crusade 1870-1872; aet. 51-53 (search)
arliest period consistent with its objects, to promote the alliance of the different nationalities, the amicable settlement of international questions, the great and general interests of peace. The appeal was translated into French, Spanish, Italian, German, and Swedish, and sent broadcast far and wide. In October our mother wrote to Aaron Powell, president of the American Peace Society: The issue is one which will unite virtually the whole sex. God gave us, I think, the word to say, butooked to the anxious face of the President with sympathy; then a voice was heard, Call for Mrs. Howe. Those present will never forget how her presence changed the meeting from a threatened failure to a noble success. The German, Frenchman, and Italian stood in turn by her side. At the proper moment she lifted a finger, and then gave in her perfect English each speech in full to the delight of the delegates and the admiration of all. The last celebration of her Mothers' Day was held in Ri
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: eighty years 1899-1900; aet. 80-81 (search)
ipt copy of my Battle Hymn and of the theft perpetrated of three of its verses in pen pictures of the War, only lately brought to my notice. He evidently thought these matters implied doubt at least of my having composed the Hymn. to this suspicion I did not allude, but showed him how the verses stolen had been altered, probably to avoid detection... March 3. Count di Campello's lecture, on the religious life in Italy, was most interesting. His uncle's movement in founding a National Italian Catholic Church seemed to me to present the first solution I have met with, of the absolute opposition between Catholic and Protestant. A Catholicism without spiritual tyranny, without ignorant superstition, would bridge over the interval between the two opposites and bring about the unification of the worldchurch.... March 13.... passed the whole morning at State house, with remonstrants against petition forbidding Sunday evening concerts. T. W. H. Spoke remarkably well.. .. March
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 12: Stepping westward 1901-1902; aet. 82-83 (search)
t to church and was physically the worse for it. ... Last night had a time of lying awake with a sort of calm comfort. Woke in the morning full of invalid melancholy, intending to keep my bed. Felt much better when in motion. Must make a vigorous effort now to get entirely well. These days of seclusion were hard for her, and every effort was made to bring the mountains to her, since she could not go to them. A club was formed among her friends in Boston for the study and speaking of Italian: this became one of her great pleasures, and she looked forward eagerly to the meetings, delighted to hear and to use the beautiful speech she had loved since childhood. February 22. The new club, Il Circolo Italiano, met at our house. Count Campello had asked me to say a few words, so I prepared a very little screed in Italian, not daring to trust myself to speak extempore in this language. We had a large attendance; I thought one hundred were present. My bit was well received, and t