hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 38 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 43 results in 12 document sections:

1 2
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Commissioners to foreign courts. (search)
d to press the subject of a treaty of alliance and commerce. Commissioners were also appointed to other European courts in 1777—Arthur Lee to that of Madrid; his brother William (lately one of the sheriffs of London) to Vienna and Berlin, and Ralph Izard, of South Carolina, to Florence. All but the French mission were failures. Arthur Lee was not allowed to enter Madrid, and went on a fruitless errand to Germany; Izard made no attempt to visit Florence, and William Lee visited Berlin without; his brother William (lately one of the sheriffs of London) to Vienna and Berlin, and Ralph Izard, of South Carolina, to Florence. All but the French mission were failures. Arthur Lee was not allowed to enter Madrid, and went on a fruitless errand to Germany; Izard made no attempt to visit Florence, and William Lee visited Berlin without accomplishing anything. There his papers were stolen from him, through the contrivance, it was believed, of the British resident minister. See ambassado
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Deane, Silas, 1737-1789 (search)
in the negotiation of a treaty of amity and alliance between the two nations. To him were intrusted the receipts and expenditures of money by the commissioners to Europe. Dr. Franklin had deserved confidence in his ability and honesty. The jealous, querulous Arthur Lee (q. v.), who became associated with him and Franklin, soon made trouble. He wrote letters to his brother in Congress (Richard Henry Lee), in which he made many insinuations against the probity of both his colleagues. Ralph Izard, commissioner to the Tuscan Court, offended because he was not consulted about the treaty with France, had written home similar letters; and William Carmichael, a secretary of the commissioners, who had returned to America, insinuated in Congress that Deane had appropriated the public money to his own use. Deane was recalled, by order of Congress, Nov. 21, 1777; arrived at Philadelphia Aug. 10, 1778; and on the 13th reported to Congress. In that body he found false reports operating ag
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Izard, George 1777-1828 (search)
Izard, George 1777-1828 Military officer; born in South Carolina in 1777; son of Ralph Izard. Having finished his education and Graves of the 11th Ohio battery-men. made a tour in Europe, he entered the United States army, in 1794, as lieute Erie, Sept. 10, urging him to move on to his support, as he had not more than 2,000 effective men. The first division of Izard's troops arrived at Lewiston on Oct. 5. He moved up to Black Rock, crossed the Niagara River, Oct. 10-11, and encamped 2out 8,000 men. He prepared to march against Drummond, who, after the sortie at Fort Erie, had moved down to Queenston. Izard moved towards Chippewa, and vainly endeavored to draw Drummond out. He had some skirmishing in an attempt to destroy a quto Fort George and Burlington Heights. Perceiving further operations in that region to be useless, and perhaps perilous, Izard crossed the river and abandoned Canada. Knowing Fort Erie to be of little service, he caused it to be mined and blown up
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Izard, Ralph (search)
Izard, Ralph Statesman; born near Charleston, S. C., in 1742; was educated at Cambridge, England, and in 1767 married a daughter of Peter De Lancey, of New York. They spent some time in Europe, and Mr. Izard was appointed by Congress commissioner to the Court of the Grand Duke of Tuscany, and resided in Paris, where he took sides with Arthur Lee against Silas Deane and Franklin (see Deane, Silas). He returned home in 1780; procured for General Greene the command of the Southern army, and Mr. Izard was appointed by Congress commissioner to the Court of the Grand Duke of Tuscany, and resided in Paris, where he took sides with Arthur Lee against Silas Deane and Franklin (see Deane, Silas). He returned home in 1780; procured for General Greene the command of the Southern army, and pledged his large estates for the purchase of ships-of-war in Europe. He was in Congress in 1781-83, and in the United States Senate in 1789-95. Two years afterwards he was prostrated by paralysis. His intellect was spared, and he lived in comparative comfort about eight years, without pain, when a second shock ended his life, May 30, 1804.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), MacOMBmb, Alexander 1782- (search)
MacOMBmb, Alexander 1782- Military officer; born in Detroit, Mich., April 3, 1782; entered the army as cornet of cavalry in 1799, and at the beginning of the war with Great Britain, in 1812, was lieutenant-colonel of engineers and adjutant-general of the army. He had five brothers in that contest. He was transferred to the artillery, and distinguished himself on the Niagara frontier. In January, 1814, he was promoted to brigadier-general, and when General Izard withdrew from the military post on Lake Champlain, in the summer of that year, Macomb was left in chief command of that region. In that capacity he won a victory over the British at Plattsburg, Sept. 11. For his conduct on that occasion he was commissioned a major-general and received thanks and a gold medal from Congress. On the death of General Brown, in 1835, General Macomb was appointed general-in- chief of the armies of the United States, which post he held at the time of his death, in Washington, D. C., June
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Senate, United States (search)
tors: From New Hampshire, John Langdon and Paine Wingate; from Massachusetts, Caleb Strong and Tristram Dalton; from Connecticut, Oliver Elsworth and William S. Johnson; from New York, Rufus King and Philip Schuyler; from New Jersey, William Paterson and Jonathan Elmer; from Pennsylvania, William Maclay and Robert Morris; from Delaware, Richard Bassett and George Read; from Maryland, Charles Carroll and John Henry; from Virginia, Richard Henry Lee and William Grayson; from South Carolina, Ralph Izard and Pierce Butler; from Georgia, William Few and James Gunn. One-half of them had been members of the convention which framed the Constitution and seventeen of them had taken part in the work of the Continental Congress. Eleven were lawyers, and among the others the record shows one merchant, one man of business, one physician, and one farmer. Following the practice of the Continental Congress and the Constitutional Convention, the Senate sat with closed doors. This practice was c
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State of South Carolina, (search)
. Moses, Jr.1873 Daniel H. Chamberlain1875 Wade Hampton1877 William D. Simpsonassumes officeFeb. 26, 1879 T. B. Jeterassumes officeSept. 1, 1880 Johnson HagoodinauguratedNov. 30, 1880 Governors under Constitution—Continued. Hugh S. Thompson1882 John P. Richardson1886 Benjamin R. TillmaninauguratedDec. 4, 1890 John Gary EvansDec. 1, 1894 William H. Ellerbe1897 Miles B. McSweeney1899 United States Senators. Name.No. of Congress.Term. Pierce Butler1st to 4th1789 to 1796 Ralph Izard1st to 4th1789 to 1795 Jacob Read4th to 7th1795 to 1801 John Hunter4th to 5th1796 to 1798 Charles Pinckney5th to 7th1798 to 1801 Thomas Sumter7th to 11th1801 to 1810 John Ewing Calhoun7th1801 to 1802 Pierce Butler8th1803 to 1804 John Gailard8th to 20th1805 to 1826 John Taylor11th to 14th1810 to 1816 William Smith14th to 18th1817 to 1823 Robert Y. Hayne18th to 22d1823 to 1832 William Harper19th1826 William Smith20th to 22d1826 to 1831 Stephen D. Miller22d1831 to 1833 John C. C
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Totten, Joseph Gilbert 1788- (search)
Totten, Joseph Gilbert 1788- Military officer; born in New Haven, Conn., Aug. 23, 1788; graduated at West Point in 1805, and was chief engineer of the army on the Niagara frontier in 1812-13. For meritorious services in the capture of Fort George he was brevetted major in June, 1813. He was chief engineer of Generals Izard and Macomb on Lake Erie in 1814, and was brevetted lieutenant-colonel for gallantry in the battle of Plattsburg. He was chief engineer of the army of General Scott in the siege of Vera Cruz in 1847, and brevetted brigadier-general. From 1846 to 1864 he was a regent of the Smithsonian Institution, and in the Civil War was chief engineer of the United States army. He was brevetted majorgeneral, United States army, the day before his death, in Washington, D. C., April 22, 1864. He was author of an able Report on the subject of National defences (1851), and translator of Vicat on mortars.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, (search)
d assaults the works and is repulsed......Aug. 15, 1814 Commodore Macdonough defeats British fleet on Lake Champlain at Plattsburg, under Commodore Downie......Sept. 11, 1814 General Macomb, with about 6,000 men, defeats 12,000 British under Sir George Provost, at Plattsburg......Sept. 11, 1814 Americans make a successful sortie at Fort Erie and destroy the British works......Sept. 17, 1814 British raise the siege after fifty-six days......Sept. 21, 1814 Americans, under General Izard, abandon Fort Erie and blow it up......Nov. 5, 1814 Treaty of peace ratified and promulgated......Feb. 17, 1815 Robert Fulton dies at New York City......Feb. 24, 1815 General disappearance of the Federal party......1815-17 De Witt Clinton elected governor to succeed Governor Tompkins, chosen Vice-President of the United States......1817 Legislature abolishes slavery from July 4, 1827......April, 1817 Erie Canal begun at Rome, Oneida county......July 4, 1817 State gra
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), War of 1812, (search)
put together. At the beginning of August, 1814, Armstrong, the Secretary of War, ordered General Izard, in command of a large body of troops at Plattsburg, to march a larger portion of them to cothe army on the Niagara frontier. This order produced amazement and indignation in the minds of Izard and his officers, for they knew the imminent peril of immediate invasion, from the region of the foot of Lake Champlain very soon, and this order produced consternation among the inhabitants. Izard wrote to the War Department in a tone of remonstrance, Aug. 11: I will make the movement you diress than three days after my departure, be in the possession of the enemy. Nine days afterwards Izard wrote to the Secretary: I must not be responsible for the consequences of abandoning my present g, where, with great diligence, General Macomb concentrated troops for defence immediately after Izard left. From the beginning of the war the government had to depend upon loans for funds, and in
1 2