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sions, say 24,000. A large army, which ought to sweep to Mobile without difficulty. Sinking Spring, as it is called by some, Mill Spring by others, and by still others Lost river, is quite a large stream. It rises from the ground, runs forty rods or more, enters a cave, and is lost. The wreck of an old mill stands on its banks. Bowling Green is three miles southward. When we get a little further south, we shall find at this season of the year persimmons and opossums in abundance. Jack says: Possum am better dan chicken. In de fall we hunt de possum ebbery night ‘cept Sunday. He am mitey good an‘ fat, sah; sometimes he too fat. We move at ten o'clock to-morrow. November, 11 We have settled down at Mitchellville for a few days. After dinner Furay and I rode six miles beyond this, on the road to Nashville, to the house of a Union farmer whose acquaintance I made last spring. The old gentleman was very glad to see us, and insisted upon our remaining until after s
, drills, parades — the old story over and over again; the usual number of corn-cakes eaten, of pipes smoked, of papers respectfully forwarded, of how-do-ye-do's to colonels, captains, lieutenants, and soldiers. You put on your hat and take a short wall. It does you no good. Returning you lie down on the cot, and undertake to sleep; but you have already slept too much, and you get up and smoke again, look over an old paper, yawn, throw the paper down, and conclude it is confoundedly dull. Jack brings in dinner. You see somebody passing; it is Captain Clayson, the Judge-Advocate, and you cry out: Hold on, Captain; come in and have a bite of dinner. He concludes to do so. Being a judge-advocate he talks law, and impresses you with the idea that every other judge-advocate has in some respects been faulty; but he has taken pains to master his duties perfectly, and makes no mistakes. Pretty soon Major Shane drops in, and you ask him to dine; but he has just been to dinner, and thanks
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Going to the front: recollections of a private — I. (search)
ptitude for crying or laughing from sympathy. Another comrade, whom I will call Jack, was honored with a call from his mother, a little woman, hardly reaching up to ithout you? You are going to fight for your country. Don't forget your mother, Jack; God bless you, God bless you! We felt as if the mother's tears and blessing we His eyes refused, as he expressed it, to dry up, until, as we were moving off, Jack's mother, rushing toward him with a bundle tied like a wheat-sheaf, called out in a most pathetic voice, Jack! Jack! you've forgotten to take your pennyroyal. We all laughed, and so did Jack, and I think the laugh helped him more than the cry dJack! you've forgotten to take your pennyroyal. We all laughed, and so did Jack, and I think the laugh helped him more than the cry did. Everybody had said his last word, and the cars were off. Handkerchiefs were waved at us from all the houses we passed; we cheered till we were hoarse, and then seJack, and I think the laugh helped him more than the cry did. Everybody had said his last word, and the cars were off. Handkerchiefs were waved at us from all the houses we passed; we cheered till we were hoarse, and then settled back and swung our handkerchiefs. Just here let me name over the contents of my knapsack, as a fair sample of what all the volunteers started with. There w
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Pea Ridge campaign. (search)
but I can't spare a gun to turn on them, was the reply. There was no supporting infantry on his left. Said Rock, I'll charge them! This meant to attack a full regiment of infantry advancing in line, 700 or 800 strong, with 22 men. Galloping back a few paces to his little band, his clear, ringing voice could be heard by friend and enemy. Battalion, forward, trot, march, gallop, march, charge! and with a wild yell in they went, their gallant chief in the lead, closely followed by Sabre Jack Murphy, an old regular dragoon; Fitzsimmons, Coggins, O'Flaherty, Pomeroy, and the others. The last named were old British dragoons; three of them had ridden with the heavy squadrons at Balaklava and all well knew what was in front of them. . . . Within thirty seconds they were right in the midst of the surprised Federal infantry, shouting, slashing, shooting. Corporal Casey charged on foot. Guibor's two guns were at the same time turned left oblique and deluged the Federal left with canis
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Western flotilla at Fort Donelson, Island number10, Fort Pillow and — Memphis. (search)
upation was not known at the time of the gun-boat reconnoissance, which included a land force accompanied by General Sherman and by Brigadier-General Cullum. This detachment landed and took formal possession. In his report of the occupation, General Cullum speaks of Columbus as the Gibraltar of the West. See also note, p. 367.-editors. On the 5th of March, while we were descending the Mississippi in a dense fog, the flag-steamer leading, the Confederate gun-boat Grampus, or Dare-devil Jack, the sauciest little vessel on the river, suddenly appeared across our track and close aboard. She stopped her engines and struck her colors, and we all thought she was ours at last. But when the captain of the Grampus saw how slowly we moved, and as no gun was fired to bring him to, he started off with astonishing speed and was out of danger before the flag-steamer could fire a gun. She ran before us yawing and flirting about, and blowing her alarm-whistle so as to announce our approach to
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.47 (search)
such a dispatch: a fatal statement in view of the fact that there is to be found (p. 365, Vol. X., Part II., Official Records ) this postscriptum to a letter from Mr. Davis to General Johnston, dated as late as March 26th, 1862: I send you [by Mr. Jack] a dictionary, of which I have the duplicate, so that you may communicate with me by cipher, telegraphic or written, as follows: First give the page by its number; second, the column by the letter L, M, or R, as it may be, in the left-hand, middslated, by one of my staff, for transmission, having been handed over to me for that purpose by General Johnston; and a copy of the translation into that cipher is to be seen, in its due order of date, in my telegraph-book of the period. That Captain Jack reached Corinth before General Johnston advanced against Pittsburg is stated, page 522 of Col. Johnston's Life of his father, on which page, I may notice, is the very letter from Davis of the 26th of March, but with the material postscriptum o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first fight of iron-clads. (search)
of the Merrimac were: Flag-Officer, Franklin Buchanan; Lieutenants, Catesby ap R. Jones (executive and ordnance officer), Charles C. Simms, R. D. Minor (flag), Hunter Davidson, John Taylor Wood, J. R. Eggleston, Walter Butt; Midshipmen, Foute, Marmaduke, Littlepage, Craig, Long, and Rootes; Paymaster, James Semple; Surgeon, Dinwiddie Phillips; Assistant-Surgeon, Algernon S. Garnett; Captain of Marines, Reuben Thorn; Engineers, H. A. Ramsey, acting chief; Assistants, Tynan, Campbell, Herring, Jack, and White; Boatswain, Hasker; Gunner, Oliver; Carpenter, Lindsey; Clerk, Arthur Sinclair, Jr.; Volunteer Aides, Lieutenant Douglas Forrest, C. S. A., Captain Kevil, commanding detachment of Norfolk United Artillery; Signal Corps, Sergeant Tabb. Every one had flocked to the army, and to it we had to look for a crew. Some few seamen were found in Norfolk, who had escaped from the gun-boat flotilla in the waters of North Carolina, on their occupation by Admiral Goldsborough and General Bur
en men by capture guerrilla chieftains commissioned by the rebel authorities Comments on plans proposed by some to break up the guerrilla warfare sickness and heavy mortality among the Indian refugees at Neosho sick and wounded being removed from Fayetteville to Fort Scott the classes of the enemy the Federals have to deal with bushwhackers guerrillas detachments returning to and leaving the State- the regular forces in our front illustrations-incidents from the expedition to low Jack the battle of Coon Creek Concluding remarks on the Indians. The 12th of February I joined the Indian division at Scott's Mills, McDonald County, Missouri, on the Cowskin river, twenty-two miles south west of Neosho, and about the same distance north of our old camp at Maysville. The bottom lands along the stream are excellent, and there are numerous fine farms, on most of which fine crops were raised last year. The movement of the division to this place is not regarded as retrograde or
tly cheerful, liberal and rational in this as in everything; but he had no ear for humour, as some persons have none for music. A joke was a mysterious affair to him. Only when so very broad and staring, that he who ran might read it, did humour of any sort strike Jackson. Even his thick coating of matter-of-fact was occasionally pierced, however. At Port Republic a soldier said to his companion: I wish these Yankees were in hell, whereupon the other replied: I don't; for if they were, old Jack would be within half a mile of them, with the Stonewall Brigade in front! When this was told to Jackson, he is said to have burst out into hearty laughter, most unusual of sounds upon the lips of the serious soldier. But such enjoyment of fun was rare with him. I was never more struck with this than one day at Fredericksburg, at General Stuart's headquarters. There was an indifferent brochure published in those days, styled Abram, a Poem, in the comic preface to which, Jackson was present
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Confederate negro enlistments. (search)
se servants who followed their masters afield, albeit not fond of bullets, are known to have now and then taken hot shots at the Yankees. Lieutenant Shelton's man Jack, of the Thirteenth Arkansas, fell at his master's side at the battle of Belmont. When Jack was shot, Jack's son took his rifle and went to the field to avenge hiJack was shot, Jack's son took his rifle and went to the field to avenge his daddy. Major White, of the Alabama battalion that bore his name, had a negro servant who risked his life to bear off his master's body from the field when he was shot down, and after the funeral he took his master's horse and effects, and rode home with them, over a thousand miles, to the old plantation. A Florida negress illuJack's son took his rifle and went to the field to avenge his daddy. Major White, of the Alabama battalion that bore his name, had a negro servant who risked his life to bear off his master's body from the field when he was shot down, and after the funeral he took his master's horse and effects, and rode home with them, over a thousand miles, to the old plantation. A Florida negress illustrated the principle of family pride which is characteristic of the race, in a quaint and touching way. Her young masters, both lads, were conscripted and ordered to Pensacola. As they were taking tearful leave of friends and home, the old mammy said: Now, young marsters, stop dis hyar cryin‘; go and fight fer yo‘ country like m
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