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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 8.25 (search)
e latter, on the 19th, dispatched a force of 3000 men or more under General Parsons and Colonel Congreve Jackson across the river to repel Sturgis's advance, then within fifteen miles of Lexington. Sin full in the History of Lafayette county, from which we condense the following statement: Governor Jackson having appropriated the school fund of the State to the arming and equipment of the State t of the gold was delivered to General Price, but $15,000 in notes of the bank was missing. Governor Jackson and General Price ordered all the money to be restored to the bank, but on the 30th of Septfund. At the time of the capture of Lexington the State Convention of Missouri had deposed Governor Jackson and elected in his place Hamilton R. Gamble. The Union State Government made demand afterwe State issued therefor, which were redeemed at their face value when due. The sum given to Governor Jackson was charged by the bank to profit and loss. See also page 280 for General Fremont's declar
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Pea Ridge campaign. (search)
further to the left, and opened on the enemy's right wing. Mr. Wilson says of the first Confederate line: Some State Guard Cavalry under Bob McCulloch and Congreve Jackson formed on the extreme left. Then on their right came Bledsoe's and Clark's and McDonald's batteries, Rains's infantry, Wade's battery, a regiment of infantrnces where flanking manoeuvres of great detachments from the main army have been successful, but more through non-interference with: them than for other reasons. Jackson's detour into the rear of the Army of Virginia, in August, 1862, was a strategical surprise, that was only successfully executed because it was not discovered in time, or rather because, when discovered, it was not properly met. The flanking movement and attack by Jackson, against the Eleventh Corps at the battle of Chancellorsville, was very successful from a strategical and tactical point of view, as the enemy not only gained the right flank of our army without being interfered with, but
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Pea Ridge, Ark. (search)
William Y. Slack (m w), Col. Thomas H. Rosser: Battalion Infantry, Col. John T. Hughes; Battalion Infantry, Major R. S. Bevier; Battalion Infantry, Col. Thomas H. Rosser; Battalion Cavalry, Col. G. W. Riggins; Light Battery, Capt. Wm. Lucas.. Brigade loss: k, 5; w, 37--42. Third Brigade, Col. Colton Greene. Brigade loss: k, 6; w, 59 = 65. State troops, Second Division, Brig.-Gen. Martin E. Green. Third Division, Col. John B. Clark, Jr.: 1st Infantry, Major Rucker (w); 2d Infantry, Col. Congreve Jackson; 3d Infantry, Major Hutchinson; 4th and 5th Infantry (consolidated), Col. J. A. Poindexter (w); 6th Infantry, Lieut.-Col. Peacher. Division loss: k, 11; w, 101; m, 35 = 147. Fifth Division, Col. James P. Saunders: detachments of infantry, cavalry, and Kelly's battery of artillery. Division loss: k, 9; w, 32 = 41. Sixth Division, Major D. H. Lindsay: detachments of infantry and Gorham's battery of artillery. Division loss: w, 13; m, 34 = 47. Seventh and Ninth Divisions, Brig.-Gen.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Composition and losses of the Confederate army. (search)
William Y. Slack (m w), Col. Thomas H. Rosser: Battalion Infantry, Col. John T. Hughes; Battalion Infantry, Major R. S. Bevier; Battalion Infantry, Col. Thomas H. Rosser; Battalion Cavalry, Col. G. W. Riggins; Light Battery, Capt. Wm. Lucas.. Brigade loss: k, 5; w, 37--42. Third Brigade, Col. Colton Greene. Brigade loss: k, 6; w, 59 = 65. State troops, Second Division, Brig.-Gen. Martin E. Green. Third Division, Col. John B. Clark, Jr.: 1st Infantry, Major Rucker (w); 2d Infantry, Col. Congreve Jackson; 3d Infantry, Major Hutchinson; 4th and 5th Infantry (consolidated), Col. J. A. Poindexter (w); 6th Infantry, Lieut.-Col. Peacher. Division loss: k, 11; w, 101; m, 35 = 147. Fifth Division, Col. James P. Saunders: detachments of infantry, cavalry, and Kelly's battery of artillery. Division loss: k, 9; w, 32 = 41. Sixth Division, Major D. H. Lindsay: detachments of infantry and Gorham's battery of artillery. Division loss: w, 13; m, 34 = 47. Seventh and Ninth Divisions, Brig.-Gen.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 3: military operations in Missouri and Kentucky. (search)
o Lexington, a large number of Price's soldiers had neither eaten nor slept for thirty-six hours.--Price's Report to Governor Jackson, September 28, 1861. nearly exhausted, withdrew, at sunset, to the Fair-grounds, to await the arrival of his wagon-tom which his battery, under Captain Guibor, poured a steady fire upon the garrison. Near Rains, the division of Colonel Congreve Jackson was posted as a reserve; and near Parsons, a part of General Steen's division performed the same service, whilstvalry equipments, wagons, teams, ammunition, and $100,000 worth of commissary stores.--See General Price's Report to Governor Jackson, September 24th, 1861. In addition to all this, Price said, I obtained the restoration of the great seal of the Statat this place had been robbed, and which I have caused to be returned to it. The disloyal State Legislature, with Governor Jackson, had held a session in the court-house at Lexington only a week before the arrival of Colonel Mulligan. They fled s
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 33. capture of Lexington, Missouri. (search)
of the college, and did inestimable service in the accomplishment of these purposes. Col. Congreve Jackson's division, and a part of Gen. Steen's, were posted near Gen. Rains and Gen. Parsons, asndantly declare this. Among other proofs that it was a covert prize, was the fact that Claib. Jackson and the Legislature had been in session there as late as only the week previous to the arrival ty. The prisoners will be taken to Springfield and held for exchange, rank for rank. Claib. Jackson came into Lexington on Saturday, it is reported, bringing his travelling Legislature with him. rice, Rains, Parsons, Slack, and who else I know not, but certain it is that the entire army of Jackson is here. The fight was begun by the pickets as early as eight o'clock, and was continued durin him where Price's army was quartered. Our picket told him to surrender, and brought him in. Gov. Jackson is here, also Gen. Harris, and many of the prominent rebels. This county, Lafayette, is the
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 34. attack on Santa Rosa Island. October 9, 1861. (search)
this moment came up and, the enemy retreating, followed on. During this time Major Tower and Lieut. Jackson, whom I had successively sent on to push forward the Zouaves, succeeded in getting some collrs whose names I give: Major Tower and Lieut. Reese, of the Engineers; Lieuts. Duryea, Langdon, Jackson, and Taylor, United States Artillery; and Captain Dole, of the New York Volunteers. And it givson and his celebrated Zouaves, who had taken a position on the island. Early in the evening Col. Jackson visited our camp and informed us that he required one hundred and fifty from our regiment (thunior officer, was on the left, but that wing arrived too late to take part in the action. Col. Jackson accompanied the expedition, and the entire force, which consisted of about twelve hundred menere. Among the killed are Lieut. L. A. Nelms of the McDuffie Rifles, of Warrenton, and aid to Col. Jackson; Joseph H. Adams and Fred. Cooke of the Clinch Rifles; and J. Stanton of the Irish Volunteers
executed every order with promptness and bravery; the men without exception acquitted themselves to my entire satisfaction. The result of our descent was as follows: The capture of property and prisoners — Wm. J. Roberts, Bandit Captain. D. L. Samuel, Capt. A. C., Sixth Division M. S. G.; W. Carroll, Second Lieutenant. J. M. Cyrus, Forage Master. Privates — N. Ellison, T. Jackson, W. M. Itson, J. J. Itson, R. D. Itson, B. Itson, W. P. Gordon, M. J. Hall, H. C. Richardson, E. B. Jackson, C. Jackson, R. A. Roberts, D. Moulden, A. T. Loveall, W. M. Thurman, Geo. Carroll, J. W. Coffee, R. Greenville, Stephen English, Bazell Rose, R. Wines, W. A. Stephens, P. Rexode, N. Cooper, A. T. Bayley, B. F. Ayers, J. Allison, J. C. Snider, A. G. Miller, J. Cummins, notorious sheriff, making a total of seventy-seven now in custody; also five horses, two mules, twenty-six guns, two pistols, one keg powder, half a bushel bullets, as well as peaceful possession of the town. All of which is respectful
ook possession of the town and camped his troops at the fair grounds. After waiting several days for his ammunition train to come up, he closely invested the stronghold of the enemy. Rains' division occupied an advantageous position to the east and northeast of the works, from which an effective artillery fire was kept up by Bledsoe's and Churchill Clark's batteries. Parsons took position with his division and Guibor's battery southwest of the works. A part of General Steen's and Col. Congreve Jackson's commands was held in reserve. Skirmishers and sharpshooters from the commands first named did effective service harassing the enemy and cutting off their supply of water. Without water it was impossible for Mulligan to hold his position. He lost a number of men going to and returning from the spring upon which he depended. At last a woman was sent or volunteered to go. This was a silent appeal to the chivalry of the Missourians, and it was effective. Not a shot was fired at h
servedly commended in the accompanying report of Brig. Gen. Rains. Gen. Parsons took a position southwest of the works, whence his battery, under command of Capt. Guibor, poured a steady fire into the enemy. Skirmishers and sharpshooters were also sent forward from both of these divisions to harass and fatigue the enemy, and to cut them off from the water on the north, east, and south of the college, and did inestimable service in the accomplishment of these purposes. Colonel Congreve Jackson's division and a part of Gen. Steen's were posted near Gen. Rains and Gen. Parson as a reserve, but no occasion occurred to call them into action. They were, however, at all times vigilant, and ready to rush upon the enemy. Shortly after entering the city on the 18th, Col. Rives, who commanded the fourth division in the absence of Gen. Slack, led his regiment and Col. Hughes's along the river bank, to a point immediately beneath and west of the fortifications--Gen. McBride's c