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Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 163 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
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Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 1: parentage, and Early years. (search)
ed the same policy which the affection of Cummins Jackson had prompted, requiring them to pursue tn stated that Thomas always received from Cummins Jackson the liberal treatment of a son. Thencefor of many of the sons of the soil, besides General Jackson, have given proof that book-learning is busness, concealed an unscrupulous character. Jackson held an execution against his property for a e, therefore, when his debtor was dismounted, Jackson went up and taxed him with his breach of prom horse. He prudently adopted the latter, and Jackson secured the prize triumphantly in the stable,ded him did not make him, simply, another Cummins Jackson. The generous kindness of this uncle, th teachings and prayers? Of this uncle General Jackson always spoke with grateful affection; as he was evidently his favorite nephew. Cummins Jackson displayed his restless love of adventure by n he sought to avoid allowing payments, which Jackson well knew had been made, by saying he had no [8 more...]
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 2: the cadet. (search)
therefore left the village with. out reporting to the authorities of the school, and returned home to resign his appointment. This occurred in the summer of 1842. The self-indulgence of this youth, and the contrasted energy and hardihood of Jackson, bore fruits which may well be pondered by every young man. The former was consigned, by the rejection of the providential occasion for self-improvement, to a decent mediocrity, from which his name has never been sounded by the voice of fame. Tho are as busy in discussing their neighbors' affairs as in repairing their implements of labor. Just at the time when the young man who has been mentioned returned to the country, relinquishing his West Point nomination, it so chanced that Cummins Jackson had occasion to go to this smith, for the repair of some of the machinery of his mill. The good man said to him, informing him of the indiscretion of his young neighbor, Here now is a chance for Tom Jackson, as he is so anxious for an educa
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 5: secession. (search)
rights had always maintained, and to which Major Jackson was committed by the firmest convictions. stand the political conclusions adopted by Major Jackson, in common with the most of his fellow-citere accordingly ordered to this place; and Major Jackson went with them, leading his battery of ligr of these, called Breckinridge Democrats, Major Jackson adhered with his usual quiet decision, spe Free States, and in Virginia. With these Major Jackson sympathized. Although this class of patrimore earnestly to deprecate the crime than Major Jackson. A month before the catastrophe, he calleisdain. The world has learned to consider Jackson as the hero of the Virginia of 1861. The Com strive to the death. The great career of Jackson is identified with the cause of Southern indef then the secession of Virginia was a crime, Jackson was the most amazing of self-deceivers, or thederate States, in the second place, like General Jackson, would disdain to argue this cause from t[5 more...]
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 6: first campaign in the Valley. (search)
thstanding his reputation for singularity, Major Jackson had upon the confidence of his countrymen,f rank, he wished to beg him for some aid. Major Jackson at once assented. He went with the soldielent, it was impossible that an officer of Major Jackson's reputation should be wholly overlooked. sanction, when some one asked, Who is this Major Jackson, that we are asked to commit to him so rese to joy and docility. The reputation of Colonel Jackson as a stark fighter in the Mexican War, laanding at Harper's Ferry. This furnished Colonel Jackson all the evidence which he desired, to justter, in a way equally honorable to both; Colonel Jackson became at once a trusted subordinate, andstroyed the bridge. On the 19th of June, Colonel Jackson was sent with his brigade north of Martin advanced them, with the design of enveloping Jackson in their folds. But he had posted his infantis combat, known as that of Haines' Farm, Colonel Jackson employed only 380 men (for the whole of t[24 more...]
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 7: Manassas. (search)
the eastern slope of the mountain. Here General Jackson turned his brigade into an enclosure occuould be aroused, and a guard set. No, replied Jackson, let the poor fellows sleep; I will guard theeir destination more easily by railroad. General Jackson's infantry was placed upon trains there, g before the commencement of the battle. General Jackson's whole command reached the Junction at d the other two were those of Generals Bee and Jackson, and the heroism of these two was sufficient igent view of the important part borne by General Jackson in the battle. At four o'clock on the moeet the enemy descending from Sudley. But as Jackson advanced in this direction, the firing becameands were disheartened and almost broken. As Jackson advanced to their assistance, he met the fragown in open fields to a valley, which divided Jackson at the moment from the advancing enemy; but t of a yard in depth. The soldierly eye of Jackson, at a glance, perceived that this was the spo[3 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.23 (search)
ere, and many a time-worn man delights to talk of Jonathan and Cummins Jackson, and the traits of character which made them known for miles aremainder of his boyhood was passed. Zzzhis Nephew. Cummins Jackson was intemperate, fond of gambling, betting and horse-racing, bver thrown from his horse, and seldom failed to win a race. Young Jackson became one of my scholars at the age of fourteen. In school he waer. One morning on the way to school a big bully, much older than Jackson, behaved very badly toward some of the schoolgirls. Jackson, who Jackson, who was present, told the offender he must apologize or he would thrash him. The bully, feeling himself an overmatch for his antagonist, declined to do so, whereupon Jackson pluckily attacked him, and a long and bloody fight followed. Jackson in the end came off victorious and forced Jackson in the end came off victorious and forced the bully, much against his will, to apologize for his behavior. The military instinct in Jackson asserted itself early. While yet but a