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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
line, which the prisoner did not recognize as such, and the negro shot him dead, and went unpunished. That shooting prisoners without cause or provocation, was of frequent occurrence by the negro guards. This affidavit was taken before Daniel Jackson, Justice of the Peace. Joseph Hetterphran, from Fayetteville, Georgia, writes that he was captured on the 27th of January, 1864, in East Tennessee; searched and robbed with his companions of everything. They were hurried by forced marchess left in the trail of these men. An aged and respectable minister was hanged in Middletown, Virginia, by military order, for shooting a soldier in the attempt to violate his daughter in his own house in Greenbrier county. David Nelson, of Jackson, was shot because his son was in the Confederate army. Another person named Peters, a mere boy, was shot for having a pistol hidden. Garland A. Snead, of Augusta, Georgia, said he was taken prisoner at Fisher's Hill, Virginia, September, 1
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
nds of North Carolina......November, 1785 Eleventh Continental Congress adjourns; 298 days session......Nov. 4, 1785 Twelfth Continental Congress meets at New York......Nov. 7, 1785 John Hancock, of Massachusetts, chosen president of the Continental Congress......Nov. 23, 1785 [Did not serve owing to illness.] James Rumsey succeeds in propelling a boat by steam and machinery on the Potomac......March, 1786 First spinning-jenny in the United States put in operation by Daniel Jackson, of Providence, R. I.......1786 Nathaniel Gorham chosen president of the Continental Congress......June 6, 1786 Gen. Nathanael Greene dies at Mulberry Grove, Ga.......June 19, 1786 Ordinance establishing the coinage passed......August, 1786 Delegates from Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey, and New York, at Annapolis, Md., consider the condition of the nation, and request all the States to send delegates to a convention at Philadelphia in May following......Sept. 11
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Rhode Island, (search)
Public reception given to General Washington in Newport......March 6, 1781 General Assembly authorizes manumission of slaves, makes free negroes or mulattoes born in the State after March 1, 1784, and repeals slavery act of 1774......Feb. 23, 1784 Marine Society, instituted in 1754 under the name of The fellowship Club, is chartered......June, 1785 Stephen Hopkins dies near Providence......July 13, 1785 First spinning-jenny in the United States made and put in operation by Daniel Jackson, of Providence......1786 Act passed for emitting £ 100,000 in bills of credit, and making the same a legal tender at par......1786 Newport, incorporated as a city, June 1, 1784, resumes its old form of town government......March 27, 1787 African slave-trade forbidden, with penalties of £ 100 for each person imported from Africa, and £ 1,000 for the vessel......Oct. 29, 1787 Motion made in the General Assembly for the appointment of delegates to the general convention of the c
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
d, Gideon B. Richmond, William R. Huston, Phineas B. Smith, Thomas H. Lester, aldermen. In 1863, George Lewis, mayor; Samuel Little, Phineas B. Smith, James E. Adams, Gideon B. Richmond, William R. Huston, Moses H. Day, John H. Lester, Ivory Harmon, alder men. In 1864, George Lewis, mayor; Samuel Little, Ivory Harmon, Phineas B. Smith, James E. Adams, William Seaver, Richard Holmes, Moses H. Day, John F. Newton, aldermen. In 1865, George Lewis, mayor; Samuel Little, William C. Harding, Daniel Jackson, James E. Adams, William Seaver, Richard Holmes, Moses H. Day, John F. Newton, aldermen. The city-clerk during all the years of the war was Joseph W. Tucker. The city-treasurer during the same period was Joseph W. Dudley. 1861. A special meeting of the city government was called by Mayor Gaston on the evening of the 19th of April, who sent in a message calling the attention of the council to the perilous condition of the country. The Sixth Massachusetts had been attacked in Bal