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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
ons were adopted by the city council of Newburyport:— Resolved, That while they would consider all the complaints made by the State which has voted secession and the other States that contemplate secession, and while they would urge upon our representatives and senators in General Court to repeal the Personal Liberty law, and upon our representatives and senators in Congress to prepare or accept such just and proper compromises as shall pacify the nation, they accept the language of General Jackson, the Union, it must and shall be preserved; and as Newburyport at all times has been loyal and patriotic in support of law, order, and liberty, so she will again, if the occasion calls for it, pledge life, fortune, and honor in behalf of the Constitution and Union as our fathers left them. Resolved, That this is not a time for faction or party, and we feel justified in calling upon all our fellow-citizens to forget their past party predilections, and merge in one great Union Party; w
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
, Thorley Collister, Marcius A. Gates; in 1864, Amasa Bancroft, Marcius A. Gates, John Edgel; in 1865, Marcius A. Gates, Ezra Osgood, Asa Temple. The town-clerk during all these years was Francis Richardson. The town-treasurer in 1861 was E. S. Jackson; in 1862, E. S. Jackson and T. Collister; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, C. Webster Bush. 1861. A town meeting legally warned was held April 30th, at which it was voted, first, to authorize the selectmen to purchase, at the expense of the town, E. S. Jackson and T. Collister; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, C. Webster Bush. 1861. A town meeting legally warned was held April 30th, at which it was voted, first, to authorize the selectmen to purchase, at the expense of the town, suitable uniforms sufficient for members of a volunteer company for active military service to be organized on or before the first day of June next, each member to pledge himself to sustain the Government against rebels and traitors who now threaten its destruction; second, if a full company cannot be raised in the town, uniforms shall be furnished to such citizens as shall enter said service; third, to pay to each volunteer one dollar a day for three months from date of muster, while in activ