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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 10 0 Browse Search
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison 4 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 4 0 Browse Search
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John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison, Chapter 8: the Rynders mob (search)
mprecations and a terrifying noise, by the mass of his backers. The audience, despite a natural agitation, gave way to no panic. The Abolitionist leaders upon the platform remained imperturbable. I was not aware, writes Dr. Furness, of being under any apprehension of personal violence. We were all like General Jackson's cotton-bales at New Orleans. Our demeanor made it impossible for the rioters to use any physical force against us. Rynders found himself in the midst of Francis and Edmund Jackson, of Wendell Phillips, of Edmund Quincy, of Charles F. Hovey, of William H. Furness, of Samuel May, Jr., of Sydney Howard Gay, of Isaac T. Hopper, of Henry C. Wright, of Abby Kelley Foster, of Frederick Douglass, of Mr. Garrison--against whom his menaces were specially directed. Never was a human being more out of his element. The following, according to the Herald, was what greeted Mr. Garrison's ear: Captain Rynders (clenching his fist)--I will not allow you to assail the Pr
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison, Index (search)
il of P. Crandall, 70, 71. Hayne, Robert Y., Webster's reply to, 14; appeals to Otis against G., 53; Liberator, quoted on, 53, 54. Henry, Patrick, 215. Herndon, William H., quoted, 259, 260. Holmes, 0. W., 230. Hopkins, John H., his View of Slavery, 200. Hopper, Isaac T., 210. Houghton, Lord, 251. Hovey, Charles F., 210. Howitts, the, 246. Hughes, Thomas, 251. Hutchinsons, the, 211, 212. Impartial Citizen, the, 217. Jackson, Andrew, quoted, 102; 7, 103, 210. Jackson, Edmund, 210. Jackson, Francis, 114, 123, 206, 210, 212. Jackson, Thomas J. (Stonewall), 24. Jay, William, quoted, 148, 150, 155, 156; and Antislavery societies, 150, 151, 153; 157. Jefferson, Thomas, quoted, on slavery, 13; III. Johnson, Oliver, his William Lloyd Garrison and his Times, quoted, 58, 63-65, 66-68, 69, 70, 71, 75, 76 G.'s right-hand man, 66; editor of Liberator, 66. Kane, Thomas L., 212. KANSAs-Nebraska Bill, 256. Kendall, Amos, 105. Knapp, Isaac, 56, 57. Koss
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
new light was formally approved by the Eastern Lib. 14: 135. Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society, in Mr. Garrison's presence. Aug. 4, 1844, E. Quincy writes to J. M. McKim, Philadelphia (Ms.): The [Mass.] Board are in session at this time at Mr. Jackson's house, and we have succeeded in persuading Garrison to go to Norristown [Penn.]. We think his presence very important for the purpose of showing precisely where we stand on the Disunion Question. We wish to show that we are not bigoted or icting the divinity of non-resistance. In his letter to Whittier, he perseveres in calling the American A. S. Society a Non-Resistance Society, because it will not support a pro-slavery Constitution! See Gerrit Smith's letter in Lib. 14.137. Edmund Jackson, a brother of Francis, gave, in the Liberator, his weighty assent to the doctrine in controversy, pointing Lib. 14: 102. out to those political abolitionists who urged rather amendment of the Constitution, that this was synonymous with disso
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
rto, amid the fierce this-worldliness of N. E., nothing New England. but superstition would keep [the people] (in their present low state) from perverting the Sunday yet worse by making all their time devoted to Mammon. But there is a better time a-coming, and God bless you in all attempts to bring it now. By the time the Call was first printed in the Liberator, Jan. 21, 1848; Lib. 18.11. the following signatures had been obtained: W. L. Garrison, Francis Jackson, Theodore Parker, Edmund Jackson, Charles F. Hovey, A rich, money-making merchant [of Boston], as Quincy described him to Webb (Ms. Oct. 3, 1848), at the same time a thorough-going Garrisonian. He came into the cause some three years ago, by the way of Democracy, Free Trade, Hard Money, No Monopoly, Freedom of Public Land, etc. Finding out that all the political parties were equally selfish and unprincipled, and really wishing to do some good in the world, he bethought himself of anti-slavery, and the first thing he
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 10: the Rynders Mob.—1850. (search)
trike the Villain dead? Lib. 20.77. W. L. Garrison to his Wife. New York, May 7, 1850. Ms. I arrived here safely yesterday afternoon at 4 o'clock, in Tuesday morning. S. May, jr. C. F. Hovey. company with Phillips, Francis and Edmund Jackson, Mr. May and his mother, Mr. Hovey, and other dear anti-slavery friends. The rain, which was pouring down so copiously when we left Boston, accompanied us nearly all the distance, an immense quantity having fallen over a wide tract of countastorate, p. 30. The scene recalled the descent of the Gauls upon the Roman Senate. The barbarism of Rynders was confronted with the loftiest morality, the greatest personal dignity, of the time. He found himself in the midst of Francis and Edmund Jackson, of Wendell Phillips, of Edmund Quincy, of Charles F. Hovey, of William H. Furness, of Samuel May, Jr., of Sydney Howard Gay, of Isaac T. Hopper, of Henry C. Wright, of Abby Kelley Foster, of Frederick Douglass, of Mr. Garrison—against whom h
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 9: Journalist at large.—1868-1876. (search)
mon with some of the ablest and most influential journals in the country) was especially urging, was more important than their education. Others of the Trustees sided with Mr. Phillips, Namely, Charles K. Whipple and William I. Bowditch. Edmund Jackson, the testator's brother, favored giving one-quarter of the amount to the Standard and the rest to the freedmen. and, for the sake of adjusting the matter, Mr. Garrison proposed that five thousand dollars be given to the freedmen, and the balalina was very deeply affected. Other funerals at which Mr. Garrison spoke were those of Joseph and Thankful Southwick, James Brown Yerrinton, William Adams, Bourne Spooner and wife, Mary Ann W. Johnson, William C. Nell, James Miller McKim, Edmund Jackson, Abby May Alcott, Charles C. Burleigh, and as many more not named. His tributes to Richard D. Webb, James Haughton, Charles Sumner, David Lee Child, Gerrit Smith, and Henry Wilson will be found in the N. Y. Christian Union, April 9, 1873, In