hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 5 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 5 results in 2 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jackson, Francis James (search)
Jackson, Francis James British minister to the United States, who succeeded David M. Erskine in 1809. An experienced diplomatist, he had lately figured discreditably in the affair of the seizure of the Danish fleet by British men-of-war at Copenhagen. He had become known as Copenhagen Jackson, whose conduct did not commend him to the good — will of the people of the United States. The impression was that he had come with explanations of the cause of the rejection of Erskine's arrangement. The Secretary of State, finding he had nothing to offer, addressed Jackson in a letter in which a tone of discontent was conspicuous, declaring the surprise and regret of the President that he had no explanations to offer as to the non-ratification of the Erskine arrangement, or authority to substitute any new arrangement for it. The object of the letter, probably, was to draw out from Jackson an explicit admission, as a basis for an appeal to the nation, that he had no authority to treat exc
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
809 Great Britain not revoking her Orders in council of 1807, the President proclaims the Non-intercourse act still in force towards that country......Aug. 9, 1809 David M. Erskine, British minister to the United States, recalled, and Francis J. Jackson appointed; arrives......September, 1809 [British minister F. J. Jackson left Washington, and from New York asked for his passport. His relations with this government being unsatisfactory, his recall was asked for.] Second session conminister F. J. Jackson left Washington, and from New York asked for his passport. His relations with this government being unsatisfactory, his recall was asked for.] Second session convenes......Nov. 27, 1809 Committee appointed by the House to inquire into the charge that Brig.-Gen. James Wilkinson had received a bribe from the Spanish government; or was an accomplice, or in any way concerned with the agent of any foreign power, or with Aaron Burr......April 3, 1810 General post-office established at Washington under the Postmaster-General......April 30, 1810 British and French armed vessels excluded from American waters by act approved......May 1, 1810 Second se