hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 108 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 87 1 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 28 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 20 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 18 0 Browse Search
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison 16 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 14 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 7 1 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 6 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Francis Jackson or search for Francis Jackson in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 4 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 6: the genius of Universal emancipation.1829-30. (search)
lations, growing out of his intemperate use of language on the subject of slavery. The phase of the Indian question at that time before the public was the conscienceless attempt of Georgia to dispossess the Cherokees of the lands which they held by solemn treaty with the United States, and to expel them from the State; or, if they remained after being robbed of their homes, to tax them and use their numbers (on the three-fifths basis) to swell the Federal representative population. President Jackson betrayed his sympathy with this scheme of spoliation, and was willing to see the State of Georgia set at naught the treaty obligations of the National Government; and in this, as in all previous and subsequent invasions of their sacred rights, the Indians had to submit to be plundered. There were many and loud protests from the benevolent and philanthropic portions of the community, and Mr. Garrison joined in them, insisting that the nation should keep its G. U. E., Dec. 25, 1829,
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 8: the Liberator1831. (search)
missionaries had been imprisoned to be unconstitutional— news which Mr. Garrison, as an eye-witness, says was received with the most enthusiastic applause. Indeed, Lib. 2.39. it may safely be affirmed that no event since the organization of the government, except perhaps the treaty of peace, has created a livelier sensation of joy in 1815. Boston and its vicinity than this decision of the Supreme Court. But joy was soon drowned by Georgia's nullification of the decision, with President Jackson's tacit approval. One Indian hanged, some missionaries imprisoned, the writ of the Supreme Court disregarded, the Indians removed: and the political and pseudo-philanthropic intermeddlers left to the reflection of having done much mischief, in assuming to become the defenders and guardians of a race which the humanity of our laws and people were treating with parental kindness (Boston, Thirty years view, 1: 166). Mr. Garrison's anti-masonic views had undergone no change: he was st
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 13: Marriage.—shall the Liberator die?George Thompson.—1834. (search)
icals, as well as by the general financial distress of the country in the months following President Jackson's interference with the deposits in the United States Bank. Thompson had indeed arrivedoreigner, Von Holst, Constitutional History of the United States, from the Administration of Jackson, pp. 104, 105 (pp. 107, 108, of the German original). The present translation is our own; that John Farmer, the antiquarian; of Farmer's Lib. 4.175. constant correspondent in Boston, Francis Jackson; Francis Jackson was born in Newton, Mass., in 1789, and became the historian of that toFrancis Jackson was born in Newton, Mass., in 1789, and became the historian of that town. His father, Timothy Jackson, was a minute-man who joined in the pursuit of the retreating British on April 19. 1775. He himself was a soldier at Fort Warren in Boston harbor in the War of 1812.her with Sewall, Loring, Child, and other officers of the New England Anti-Slavery Society, Francis Jackson), asking his attention to slavery and the slave trade in the District of Columbia, and call
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 14: the Boston mob (first stage).—1835. (search)
ves, shall be excluded from the communion-table and the pulpit. See the whole story and its sequel in Right and wrong in Boston for 1837. building in which all the great moral questions of the day may be discussed without let or hindrance. Francis Jackson presided, and Mr. Garrison was among the speakers, as was also Benjamin F. Hallett, editor of the Daily Advocate, who, in reporting the proceedings in his paper, said they meant to build a new Cradle of Liberty, where free discussion, and n and their organizations down; and it was firmly declared that the post-office could not constitutionally be made an Lib. 5.135. instrument for disseminating publications prohibited from circulation by the laws of any State. Worse than all, Jackson's Postmaster-General, Amos Kendall, despite his Massachusetts birth, responded to the postmaster at Lib. 5.135. Charleston that while he could not exclude papers from the mails for their tendency, he would not instruct his subordinates to for