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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Annual reunion of the Virginia division, A. N. V. (search)
Anglo-Saxon race. Great men never die, Their bones may sodden in the sun, Their heads be hung on castle gates and city walls, But still their spirits walk abroad. Again, gentlemen, permit me to thank you for your kind remembrance of the Army of Tennessee, and to again assure you that it is a pleasure to meet you to-night. Then followed a number of volunteer toasts, which were in turn happily responded to by Colonel James Lingan, President of the Louisiana Division, Army of Tennessee Association; Dr. Carrington, late of the Confederate States navy; Colonel F. R. Farrar ( Johnny Reb ), of Amelia; General Fitz. Lee; Rev. H. Melville Jackson, of Richmond; Major R. W. Hunter, of Winchester, formerly of the Staff of General Edward Johnson, and General John B. Gordon, and General J. A. Early, who always brings down the house. The whole occasion was indeed a joyous one, which renewed many glorious memories and revived hallowed associations which we would not willingly let die.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
ledsoe himself. If the present number is a fair specimen of what we may expect of the Review under its new management, then we predict for it an even wider reputation — not for ability, for that were scarcely possible, but for variety, popular interest and real value as an exponent of Southern thought and Southern literature. We regret that our limited space will allow us little more than a bare mention of the table of contents of this number: In Southern Poetry — a sketch, Rev. H. Melville Jackson gives a very pleasing and, in the main, judicious statement of the claims of Southern poets, together with some well selected illustrations of their style. Rev. Dr. W. P. Harrison gives an interesting sketch of the rise, progress and extension of the Southern Methodist church. Professor George Frederick Holmes treats The eastern question and the Berlin treaty with the fulness and ability which characterize the productions of the distinguished author. Frances Hodgson
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
fficer or private. I do not purpose to explain them now; I will do so in the future. I merely desire to furnish a connected narrative of historical facts concerning the Maryland Line in the Confederate army. Our cause in history. By Rev. H. Melville Jackson, of Richmond. [The following eloquent response to a toast at the Howitzers's Banquet in Richmond, Dec. 13th 1882, takes a view of our cause in History that is hopeful, and well worthy of preservation. It only needs to be emphasized,ely in its consecrated coronet of sorrow, and it wins the sympathy of the heart and of history. * * * The triumphs of might are transient—they pass and are forgotten—the sufferings of right are graven deepest on the chronicle of nations. Rev. H. M. Jackson responded as follows, amidst frequent applause: Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen.—I esteem myself highly honored in being permitted to mingle with you on this festal occasion, to share with you in the reminiscence of events in which I had no p<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Our cause in history. (search)
Our cause in history. By Rev. H. Melville Jackson, of Richmond. [The following eloquent response to a toast at the Howitzers's Banquet in Richmond, Dec. 13th 1882, takes a view of our cause in History that is hopeful, and well worthy of preservation. It only needs to be emphasized, that we must see to it, that the facts are preserved.] Toast-our cause in history. Sentiment.—A land without ruins is a land without memories—a land without memories is a land without history. A land thaely in its consecrated coronet of sorrow, and it wins the sympathy of the heart and of history. * * * The triumphs of might are transient—they pass and are forgotten—the sufferings of right are graven deepest on the chronicle of nations. Rev. H. M. Jackson responded as follows, amidst frequent applause: Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen.—I esteem myself highly honored in being permitted to mingle with you on this festal occasion, to share with you in the reminiscence of events in which I had n
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Annual Reunion of the Virginia division Army of Northern Virginia Association. (search)
test victories of the war. We shall hereafter make copious extracts from it. Nor can we now speak of the splendid banquet, at which admirable speeches were made by Colonel William Allan, of Maryland, Captain John Milledge, of Georgia, Rev. H. Melville Jackson, of Richmond, General Early, Judge Theo. S. Garnett, of Norfolk, Colonel Moore, of North Carolina, and others. We are glad to be able to give in full the Speech of Rev. H. Melville Jackson. Our dead We care not whence they Rev. H. Melville Jackson. Our dead We care not whence they came, Dear in their lifeless clay; Whether unknown or known to fame, Their cause and country still the same- They died-and wore the gray. Father Ryan. Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen of the Army of Northern Virginia,—Having been no soldier, I feel always, on these festive occasions, as if I were an interloper — a sharer in pleasures I have not helped to win—a spectator tolerated of your good courtesy. But to-night, when you assign to me the duty of responding to this sentiment, I meet you on co<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Pegram battalion Association. (search)
Dee Battery, of South Carolina—commanded by Colonel Wm. Johnston Pegram until he fell mortally wounded at Five Forks, April 1st, 1865: Address of Rev. H. Melville Jackson, D. D.: religion an element of strength in the soldierly character. When Aeneus related to the enamoured Queen of Carthage the story of Trojan woes, he cofell in a cause that was lost: In the God of battles is the soldier's trust. Headquarters Pegram Battalion Association, Richmond, Va., June 1st, 1887. Rev. H. Melville Jackson: dear Sir—The Pegram Battalion Association return their sincere thanks for the beautiful address delivered on the 31st ultimo, at the dedication of thpress, I herewith send you a copy of the address delivered on the occasion of the unveiling of the Memorial Window at the Soldiers' Home. Very truly yours, H. M. Jackson. Address of Hon. John Fitzhugh lay, late Colonel of cavalry, Confederate States army. To you, Major Randolph, Chairman of the Executive Committee, and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
C. M., diary of, 58, 61, 68. Palmer, Capt., 399. Palmer, Col W. H., 296 Palmetto Regiment, 15, 19. Parker, Judge, Richard, 357. Parker, Wm., 364. Parton's Andrew Jackson, 6, 7, 10. Patrick, Gen M. R., 68. Patterson, W. N., 175. Patti, Carlo, 97. Patton, Lt., 54, 55. Payne, Gen. W. H., 296. Peace Congress, The, 355. Pearce, Sergeant A. W., 91. Pearce, Lt. J. L., 58, 61, 62. Pegram Battalion Association, Dedication of Memorial Window to dead of, 194; Address of Rev. H. M. Jackson, D. D., 195; Address of Col. J. F. Lay, 207; Address of Major N. V. Randolph, 213. Pegram, Col., John, 88 Pegram, Col. W. J., 194, 203. Pemberton, criticized, Gen. John C., 130, 132, 149. Pendergrass, Lt. J. M., 177, 192. Pendleton, Gen. W. N., 108, 204; letter to from Gen. Lee, 228. Pensions to Union soldiers, 443. Perkins, Fort, 132. Perrin. Capt. J. M., 130 Perryville, Battle of, 351. Petersburg, Battle of, 21, 26; Field Telegrams Around, 261; in the trenches befo