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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 27 11 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
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cClellan and Rosecrans in West Virginia, and was defeated at Rich Mountain and other places. On July 13th, Garnett was killed while retreating, and Brigadier-General Henry R. Jackson was put in command, to be superseded, within a week, by Brigadier-General W. W. Loring. Early in 1862, dissension arose between Loring and T. J. Ja861, was appointed brigadier-general, with command of the Army of the Northwest. In the action at Carrick's Ford he was killed, June 13, 1861. Brigadier-General Henry Rootes Jackson was born in Athens, Georgia, June 24, 1820, and became a lawyer. He served in the Mexican War as colonel of the First Georgia Volunteers, and he was called by the Governor of Georgia, who made him a major-general in command of the State troops. After these became part of the Confederate army, in 1862, Jackson received no commission until July, 1864, when he was assigned a brigade in the Army of Tennessee. During the battle of Nashville he was made prisoner and not rel
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), General officers of the Confederate Army: a full roster compiled from the official records (search)
1862. Hawthorne, A. T., Feb. 18, 1864. Helm, Ben. H., Mar. 14, 1862. Hebert, Louis, May 26, 1862. Hebert, Paul O., Aug. 17, 1861. Higgins, Edward, Oct. 29, 1863. Hodge, Geo. B., Nov. 20, 1863. Hogg, Joseph L., Feb. 14, 1862. Hoke, Robert F., Jan. 17, 1863. Hood, John B., Mar. 3, 1862. Huger, Benjamin, June 17, 1861. Humes, W. Y. C., Nov. 16, 1863. Humphreys, B. G., Aug. 12, 1863. Hunton, Eppa, Aug. 9, 1863. Iverson, Alfred, Nov. 1, 1862. Jackson, Alfred E., Feb. 9, 1863. Jackson, H. R., June 4, 1861. Jackson, John K., Feb. 13, 1862. Jackson, Wm. A., Dec. 19, 1864. Jackson, Wm. H., Dec. 29, 1862. Jenkins, Albert G., Aug. 5, 1862. Jenkins, Micah, July 22, 1862. Johnston, R. D., Sept. 1, 1863. Jones, John M., May 15, 1863. Jones, John R., June 23, 1862. Jones, William E., Sept. 19, 1862. Jordan, Thomas, April 14, 1862. Kelly, John H., Nov. 16, 1863. Kirkland, W. W., Aug. 29, 1863. Lane, James H., Nov. 1, 1862. Lane, Walter P., Mar. 17, 1865. Law, Evander M.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jackson, Henry rootes 1820-1898 (search)
Jackson, Henry rootes 1820-1898 Military officer; born in Athens, Ga., June 24, 1820; graduated at Yale College in 1839, and admitted to the bar in 1840, when he settled in Savannah. He was appointed United States district attorney for Georgia in 1843. During the Mexican War he was colonel of the 1st Georgia Volunteers. At the close of the war he became part proprietor of The Georgian, in Savannah. In 1853 he was sent to the Court of Austria as the United States charge d'affaires. In 1854-58 he was minister to Austria. Returning to the United States he was commissioned a special United States district attorney for Georgia, to aid in trying notorious slavetrading cases. When the Civil War broke out he entered the Confederate army with the rank of brigadier-general. During the battle of Nashville, in December, 1864, he was taken prisoner, and was held till the lose of the war. Returning to Savannah he resumed law practice. In 1875-88 he was a trustee of the Peabody Educatio
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: poets of the Civil War II (search)
Theodore O'Hara, who had been in active service during the Mexican War and had written The Bivouac of the dead in honour of those who died in that war, was colonel of an Alabama regiment and later a staff officer in the Confederate Army. Henry Rootes Jackson, who had also fought in the Mexican War and had written My wife and child and The red old Hills of Georgia, served under Hood in the battles around Atlanta, commanded a brigade in the Army of Tennessee, and was captured in the battle of Nair minds. In this volume The Virginians of the Valley, by Ticknor, and Stonewall Jackson's way and The conquered Banner, both published anonymously, are the only poems of any value. An illustration of the carelessness of the editors is that Henry R. Jackson's My wife and child is attributed to General J. T. [T. J., or Stonewall] Jackson. More than half of the volume is given up to Songs of the Southland and other poems by Kentucky. In the following year Miss Emily V. Mason of Virginia edite
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
olonies, 108 Io Triumphe, 286 Irene, 38 Irving, Washington, 10, 22, 32, 33, 35, 128, 129, 136, 148, 150, 162, 163, 167, 173, 241, 260, 362, 368, 369, 377, 378, 381, 383, 384, 389, 401 Irving, William, 162 Isabella, Queen, 125 Isle of La Belle Riviere, 266 n. Isocrates, 96 Israfel, 65, 67 Itineraries, 201 n. Jack Downing. See Smith, Seba Jackson, Amelia Lee, 227 Jackson, Andrew, 45, 87, 88, 89, 90, 111, 120, 150, 151, 183, 291 Jackson, Helen Hunt, 383 Jackson, Henry Rootes, 290, 299 Jackson, Dr., James, 226 Jackson, T. J. (Stonewall), 283, 290, 299, 300, 302, 307 Jacobs, Joseph, 357 n. James, Henry, 18, 293, 374-376, 377, 380, 381, 384, 386, 387 James, William, 213, 375 Janvier, Thomas A., 388 Japikse, N., 146 Jay, John, 180 Jeanette, 381 Jefferson, 84, 93 n., 105, 111, 180, 183, 201 Jeffersonian, 191 Jerrold, Douglas, 148 Jespersen, Professor, 365 Jewett, Sarah Orne, 382-383, 364, 390, 402 Jolly old pedagogue, 242
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
it to be a reinforcement to my command. I had no previous knowledge of it whatever. On January 23d, Governor Brown, accompanied by his aide-de-camp, Hon. Henry R. Jackson, who had experienced military life as a colonel of a Georgia regiment in Mexico, and Col. William Phillips, visited Captain Elzey and made a verbal requestt. I am further instructed to say that an answer will be expected by to-morrow morning at 9 o'clock. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Henry R. Jackson, Aide-de-Camp, etc. About 1 o'clock on the night of the 23d of January, I received from the war department the following reply to my telegram: Capt. Aherefore directed my adjutant to address and convey the following note in reply to the governor's demand: Headquarters Augusta Arsenal, January 24, 1861. Col. H. R. Jackson, Aide-de-Camp: Sir: I have the honor to inform you that I am directed by Captain Elzey, commanding this post, to say, in reply to the demands of the gove
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
n did not cease organizing State troops. He contemplated the formation of two divisions, and intended to appoint Col. Henry R. Jackson major-general of the first division, and Col. William H. T. Walker as major-general of the second. It was found ory. The First Georgia volunteers served in West Virginia under Garnett, and after the death of that officer, under Henry R. Jackson, until December, when they were sent to Stonewall Jackson at Winchester, serving under that great leader until earlyw to the prompt organization of one division in case of emergency. The position of major-general was tendered to Gen. Henry R. Jackson, who has lately gained a very important victory over a greatly superior force of the enemy in northwestern Virginng the ship out. He then turned her over to Lieut. G. T. Sinclair and returned to Europe by way of Wilmington. Gen. Henry R. Jackson, whose gallant career in Virginia will be hereafter described, was appointed major-general of State forces by Gov
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
therefore seemed a favorable time for the Confederates to recover what they had lost in that frontier of the Confederacy. Just before the defeat of Garnett, Henry R. Jackson, of Georgia, had been commissioned brigadier-general in the army of the Confederate States and assigned to command at Monterey. He had sent forward Col. Edwunder Generals Loring and Lee commanded the Monterey division, which included the two Georgia regiments brigaded under Col. Edward Johnson. Early in August, Henry R. Jackson moved his command to Camp Bartow, on the Greenbrier river, at the head of a little valley known as Traveler's Repose. General Loring had immediate command olse of the Federal attack. Reynolds, who had expected to destroy the Confederate force, was compelled to retreat precipitately to his mountain fastness. Gen. H. R. Jackson, the commanding general, received the hearty congratulations of President Davis and the war department. In a letter to Secretary Benjamin acknowledging thi
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
nts, brigades or divisions, as might be acceptable to the Confederate war department, provided the tender was made before the 15th of January following, and should be consented to by the troops. The question of transfer was submitted to the troops and decided in the negative almost unanimously. This was previous to the conscript act. When that became a law, Governor Brown immediately tendered the State army to Brigadier-General Lawton, commanding the military district of Georgia, Maj.-Gen. Henry R. Jackson, commander of the State army, having retired in order to prevent any embarrassment. Both the governor and General Jackson in addresses to the troops expressed their appreciation of the high character of this distinctively Georgian organization, and the governor in his message in the following November, spoke in the following terms of the excellent spirit, discipline and patriotism prevailing among this body: They had performed without a murmur, an almost incredible amount of l
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 14: (search)
and in addition to that there was a clear gain in twenty days of over 3,500. Though a general and liberal system of furloughs had been adopted, the effective strength of the two infantry corps and artillery was over 35,000, December 20th. Gen. H. R. Jackson had by energetic efforts brought about a system of co-operation among the railroads, which improved the commissariat. There was a general desire on the part of the country and of the army that Gen. Joseph E. Johnston should be put in co00 men offered themselves for this service. The command of this force was conferred upon Howell Cobb, promoted to major-general with headquarters at Atlanta, and under him were Brig.-Gens. Alfred Iverson, Jr., with headquarters at Rome, and Henry R. Jackson at Savannah. Maj.-Gen. Gustavus W. Smith, who had resigned from the Confederate army, entered the service of the State with especial charge, at this time, of fortifications. At the close of the year 1863, according to the statement publi
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