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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 24, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 7, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 5, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for J. S. Jackson or search for J. S. Jackson in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: October 5, 1861., [Electronic resource], The tools of the Administration is Kentucky. (search)
ey are original emancipationist. Joshua Speed, having slept with Lincoln once, assumes to have the ear of that distinguished gentleman, and certainly influences him in his movements in Kentucky. None of the Speeds are men of ability. Col. J. S. Jackson. Col. J. S. Jackson has been regarded as a gallant, dashing, chivalrous, and honest man; but having bankrupted himself and deeply involved his friends, he repudiates, the violent and revolutionary Southern sentiments which he publicly prCol. J. S. Jackson has been regarded as a gallant, dashing, chivalrous, and honest man; but having bankrupted himself and deeply involved his friends, he repudiates, the violent and revolutionary Southern sentiments which he publicly proclaimed in Louisville in January last, became a Union candidate for Congress, was elected, voted men and money to subjugate the South, got some good contracts, and came home with a Colonel's commission in his pocket, and is recruiting for the Federal Army. John N. Harney. And last, for the present, John M. Harney, the editor of the Louisville, Democrat, some years ago the teacher of a mixed school in a free State, and frequently charged with abolitionism, had half wiped out the politic
From the Northwest. Information was received at the Department yesterday that a battle took place on Thursday, 3d inst., near Cheat Mountain, between 2,500 Georgians under Gen. Jackson, and 3,000 Federals under Gen. Reynolds. The enemy, it is said, advanced from the mountains and made the attack. After a hard fight of four hours duration the Federals were defeated with heavy loss, while the loss on our side was comparatively small.
ld be said in advance that it has been considered a most important point by the rebel forces, and their preparations for its capture and occupancy abundantly declare this. Among other proofs that it was a coveted prize was the fact that Claib. Jackson and his Legislature had been in session there as late as only the week previous to the arrival of Col. Mulligan, holding their sessions in the Court-House, whence Claib. fulminated a proclamation counter to that of Gen. Fremont. When this wortce only eight women, Col. Mulligan and several of his officers having left their wives at Jefferson City. The prisoners — the wounded and the dead. The prisoners will be taken to Springfield, and held for exchange, rank for rank. Claib. Jackson came into Lexington on Saturday, it is reported, bringing his traveling Legislature with him. We have thus hastily thrown together the main features of the protracted defence of Lexington, without detail, and almost without touching upon th