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about through the woods, came several times in close proximity to rebel squads, but succeeded in eluding them. He at last overtook three of them, and seeing that his chances were desperate, he determined to join them and pass himself off as one of their number. By keeping a little in the rear he watched a favorable opportunity, when he drew his revolver, and firing rapidly, killed one, badly wounded another, and caused the third to take to flight. Wilkins succeeded in making his escape, and returned to camp at Calhoun, where a gentleman arrived the next day from Elkton, and stated that the rebel cavalry reported that the country was overrun with Federal troops, and that they had been forced to retreat before a superior force. The camp at Calhoun contains plenty of such pluck in the regiments under Colonels Shackleford, Jackson, Hawkins, and Burbridge. The men are eager for fight, and will rout the rebels whenever and wherever they meet them. Louisville Journal, Dec. 29, 1861.
usband, who was formerly in the army, died. Her two daughters are finely educated. These latter were, after being confined six weeks, sent to Fortress Monroe. Next in turn comes Mrs. Betty A. Hassler, who was born and reared in Washington. She possessed the least education of any woman ever confined in this prison. Her husband is a Southern man. She is fascinating in appearance, but has not much decision of character. She was released on parole by order of the Secretary of War. Mrs. Jackson, the mother of the assassin of Ellsworth, has also been confined at this point. She came here with nothing but a flannel gown on, and wearing slave shoes. She was incarcerated but two days and nights. She has now gone South, to Richmond, where she has been endeavoring, with but little success, to obtain funds for the support of her family. It is rumored that she is not able to collect enough funds to support her from day to day. Miss Lilly Mackle, a daughter of Mackle, a clerk in o
t the fell desires Of the base secession crew? Shall we let such knaves and traitors, Robbers, thieves, and freedom-haters, All our nation's great creators' Most successful work undo? No! By Washington and Wayne, Adams, Franklin, Lee, and Penn, All those brave, true-hearted men Who Freedom gained and Union gave us-- Up! and fight for Law and Order, Fight until the last marauder Ye have driven from your border, Who oppress and would enslave us! By that bright and proud array-- Patriot names of later day-- Jackson, Webster, Wirt, and Clay, Statesmen, orators, and sages-- Who have battled, “armed men strong,” For the right against the wrong, That their country loved might long Stand the hope of unborn ages. By the God of heaven above us, By the dear ones loved, who love us, By all motives pure that move us, The Hero's or the Martyr's crown-- We will never yield us, never, Till the fiends who seek to sever Our loved country are for ever And for evermore put down! Louisville Journ
and that Capt. C. E. Merriwether, who fell while bravely charging the enemy, at Sacramento, on Saturday last, had long been an intimate and devoted friend of Col. Jim Jackson. He was an endorser for Jackson for a large amount, and as Jackson had become utterly bankrupt by heavy losses at the gambling-table, Capt. Merriwether had Jackson for a large amount, and as Jackson had become utterly bankrupt by heavy losses at the gambling-table, Capt. Merriwether had been compelled to pay some twelve or fifteen thousand dollars of this endorsed paper within the last three months. Callous though he may be, we do not envy Jackson's feelings, when he reflects that through his agency and his men his best friend and benefactor has been deprived of life. Bowling Green Courier, January 4. Jackson had become utterly bankrupt by heavy losses at the gambling-table, Capt. Merriwether had been compelled to pay some twelve or fifteen thousand dollars of this endorsed paper within the last three months. Callous though he may be, we do not envy Jackson's feelings, when he reflects that through his agency and his men his best friend and benefactor has been deprived of life. Bowling Green Courier, January 4.
A noble Jerseyman.--A Connecticut captain--Capt. Jackson, of the Tenth--writes the following in a letter to the Danbury Times: One man belonging to a New-Jersey regiment had both his legs shot off below the knee, yet he said he thanked God he was there, and only wished that he had more legs so that he could go again. So cheerful is he, although quite an old man, that some of the wounded getting into a dispute, he told them that if they did not stop making a noise he would get up and kick them.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
e under the gallant and daring Pickett. It was never intended by the Divine Hand that this nation as a nation should perish from the earth. On the contrary, cemented by the blood of its bravest and best, it was foreordained that it should continue to live, to bless and guide the nations of the earth. And I have no doubt that the time will come when this great republic as a nation will feel proud of the courage and achievements of the Southern soldier, and will revere the names of Lee and Jackson as it now reveres the names of Grant and Sheridan. I am not unmindful that there be those who would rob us of our title to courage and honor—all that remains to us as a result of the war. But of this rest assured, they are not of the soldiers who fought in that struggle. These, if they would, could not afford to disparage our courage or bravery, for on this pedestal rests their own prowess and fame. For, take notice of this fact, no nation will discredit its own deeds of heroism. All
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
C. Bowden, Ed. Clough, J. H. Childress, * Luther Childress, W. M. Crouch, * George Cardwell, Robert Clements, W. E. Dennis, J. D. Drumwright, J. H. Dickerson, * William Davenport, J. E. Dugings, William Edwards, *Daniel Eads, J. L. Farmer, Dick Foster, T. M. Gathright, * M. H. Gathright, W. A. Gray, * William Gentry, *Ed. Gammon, Henry Holman, R. J. Hoye, Daniel Hughes, Sam Humphries, * Newton Hodges, * G. W. Johnson, Charlie Johnson, *Jim Jackson, * Bob Knibb, * Dabney Lane, William Lumsden, L. B. Laseur, Thomas Loyall, *Jim Loving, * George Loving, C. E. Massie, William Macbride, * Aleck McLaine, *Jim Miller, Frank Mathews, B. J. Nuckols, J. P. Nicholas, William Nunnally, J. E. Perkins, *N. Perkins, J. R. Poor, Charlie Palmer, Ed. Powers, J. N. Pleasants, Sam Pettitt, Luston Phillips, * George Radford, * Tom Rigsby, William Richardson, *J. C. Riddell, * S. J. Rock, *
Narrow escape. --Last Friday, as a negro named Jim Jackson was driving his team along the street, his saddle mule fell and catching his left leg under him, dislocated his ankle and fractured one of his toes. He was taken to the hospital and put under medical treatment.
The Daily Dispatch: December 17, 1860., [Electronic resource], Extraordinary Proceedings in a murder trial. (search)
Accident. --On Saturday last a negro named Sam, had one of his feet nearly severed from his leg while cutting wood on 17th street. Dr. Jackson was sent for to dress the wound.
Wanted — to purchase servants --1 Woman, a No. 1 Cook, Washer and Ironer, without incumbrance, young, healthy and of good character. 1 Boy of man, to act in the capacity of dining-room servant, attend an office, and anything else his master may require. 1 Boy or man, to act as Nurse and Chambermaid, if required. Apply at my residence, on 5th street, west side, between night and Jackson sts. or by note to the undersigned, in care of Messrs. James M. Taylor & Son, Auct'rs. James E. Goddin. de 17--3t
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