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The Daily Dispatch: September 17, 1862., [Electronic resource] 30 0 Browse Search
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t 9, at Cedar Mountain, with the forces under Jackson, which compelled his retreat across the Rapidace of superior numbers. The movement of Jackson toward White Plains, and in the direction of not less than twenty-five thousand men, under Jackson. By this time the army corps of Heintzelman,e — th. As soon as it became known to me that Jackson was on the railroad, it became apparent that I could not detach a sufficient force to meet Jackson, and at the same time attempt to confront the as to intercept any reinforcements coming to Jackson through Thorough fare Gap; and instructing Re advance (Gibbon's brigade.) met the force of Jackson retiring from Centreville, and about six mileeavy forces of the enemy advancing to support Jackson. As soon as I found that the enemy had br in plain view to reinforce the troops under Jackson, without an effort to prevent it or assist u orders to do, we should utterly have crushed Jackson before the forces under Lee could have reache
learn the exact disposition of the forces on our side. It turns out that the twenty pieces of artillery of which I spoke in my formes letter, occupied the centre and front with General Anderson's division; on our right was Longstreet, and left, Jackson. The fight was brought on by the artillery, and a few troops upon our right and left, all in sight of our batteries, and not more than 1,000 yards off. Of this there can be no mistake. If you will read the Yankee accounts you will see what a dy Gen. Leo. This, though a good position, and not command so extensive a view, especially towards the right, as did ours. A short time before the fight began in the afternoon, signals with white flags were made from headquarters on the hill to Jackson's position on the left, but of the nature of them we could know nothing. I supposed they indicated that the enemy was sending his forces towards our right, a movement which we had observed, and which, I think, must have been a feint. In re
sterday, renders it almost certain that the Yankees at Harper's Ferry, in Jefferson county, numbering some eight thousand, have surrendered to our forces under Gen. Jackson. A gentleman who came down on the Central train states that Gen. Jackson crossed the Potomac on Friday afternoon and moved on Martinsburg, and that the FederaGen. Jackson crossed the Potomac on Friday afternoon and moved on Martinsburg, and that the Federal force there, some two or three thousand, fell back to Harper's Ferry, where there was a Yankee army of about five thousand. On Saturday morning Gen. Jackson marched down to Halltown, in Jefferson county, four miles west of the Ferry, where he encamped that night. Another division of our army was said to be in possession of theGen. Jackson marched down to Halltown, in Jefferson county, four miles west of the Ferry, where he encamped that night. Another division of our army was said to be in possession of the Maryland Heights, opposite Harper's Ferry, while a third division was stated to be marching on the same point from the Loudoun side. The Federal forces were thus completely hemmed in, without chance of escape, and, if the statement be true that our forces had possession of Maryland Heights, with little hope of successful resista