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Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 1: parentage, and Early years. (search)
farmers of German extraction, named Brake. Jonathan Jackson, the father of the subject of this work, adopt under the guidance of his distinguished cousin, Judge Jackson of Clarksburg. His patronage induced him to go literated the record of the exact date, so that General Jackson himself was unable to fix it with certainty. Oves as a worthy matron in Randolph County. Jonathan Jackson, the General's father, is said to have been, w widow and babes. The Masonic Order, of which Jonathan Jackson was an officer, gave to the widow a little cotmember of the Wesleyan or Methodist communion. General Jackson always spoke of her with tender affection, and s mother's name, Julia Neale. In the year 1830, Mrs. Jackson, whose youth and beauty still fitted her to pleauntry. He was a sort of decayed gentleman, much Mrs. Jackson's senior,--a widower, without property, but of r, social turn. The marriage was distasteful to Mrs. Jackson's relatives. They threatened, as a sort of pena
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jackson, Jonathan 1743-1810 (search)
Jackson, Jonathan 1743-1810 Patriot; born in Boston, Mass., June 4, 1743; graduated at Harvard College in 1761; held a seat in the Provincial Congress in 1775; was United States marshal in 1789-91. He wrote Thoughts upon the political situation of the United States. He died in Boston, Mass., March 5, 1810.
ion, and possesses a local interest in this community. It is a deed of manumission, made after our struggles had begun, and preserved in the Probate records of the County of Suffolk. Here it is: Know all men by these presents, that I, Jonathan Jackson, of Newburyport, in the county of Essex, gentleman, in consideration of the impropriety I feel, and have long felt, in beholding any person in constant bondage—more especially at a time when my country is so warmly contending for the libertyhereby liberate, manumit, and set him free; and I do hereby remise and release unto said Pomp, all demands of whatever nature I have against said Pomp. In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal, this nineteenth June, 1776. Jonathan Jackson. [Seal.] Witness, Mary Coburn, William Noyes. Such was the general spirit. Public opinion found free vent in every channel. By the literature of the time—by the voice of the Church, and by the solemn judgment of the College, Slavery w
ion, and possesses a local interest in this community. It is a deed of manumission, made after our struggles had begun, and preserved in the Probate records of the County of Suffolk. Here it is: Know all men by these presents, that I, Jonathan Jackson, of Newburyport, in the county of Essex, gentleman, in consideration of the impropriety I feel, and have long felt, in beholding any person in constant bondage—more especially at a time when my country is so warmly contending for the libertyhereby liberate, manumit, and set him free; and I do hereby remise and release unto said Pomp, all demands of whatever nature I have against said Pomp. In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal, this nineteenth June, 1776. Jonathan Jackson. [Seal.] Witness, Mary Coburn, William Noyes. Such was the general spirit. Public opinion found free vent in every channel. By the literature of the time—by the voice of the Church, and by the solemn judgment of the College, Slavery w
Hides. David Stone. Samuell Stone. Jeames × Cutler. John Wintor. John Collar. Joseph Miriam. Isack Starnes. David Fiske. Solomon Prentes. Joseph Sill. Samuell Hasting. Richard × Frances. Robart × Brown. Thomas × Brown. John Swan. We, whose names are subscribed, being of the traine band and singell men in the above sayd town, doe also desire to manifest ourselves to be of the same mynd with our parents, masters, and the aged men and housholders of the place. Thomas Oliver. Jonathan Jackson. John Jackson. Sebeis Jackson. Steven Cooke. Jacob Goble. Joseph × Stevenes. Daniel Champnes. John Steadman. Thomas Gates. Arther × Henbury. Robart × Shepard. Daniell × Prat. Philip Eastman. Arthur call. Thomas Marritt. Joseph Pratt. Thomas Ffledg. John Hastins. John more. John Holis. Gershom Frost. Abraham × Howell. Beniaman × Russell. Sameuel Bucke. Joseph ffrost. William Reyle. Samuell × Garry. Nath. Patten. Stephen Frances. Reuben Luxfford. Samuell × Robin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Paroles of the Army of Northern Virginia. (search)
B. Tommey. Co. F. 3d Sergeant J. N. Bray, 5th Sergeant Isaiah Elliott, 1st Corporal P. J. Hough, 3d Corporal J. W. Gibson, Private A. N. Agerton, G. F. Brazil, H. V. Glenn, B. H. Galloway, J. B. Hough, T. H. Halloway, Jno. Jackson, J. E. Lewe, F. M. Logan, Private P. L. Minshem, J. T. Prior, J. A. Paul, W. T. Paulk, J. E. Rudd, M. V. Rudd, W. M. Rives, S. J. Rogers, F. M. Roundtree, F. M. Smith, W. J. Seay, W. S. Wynick, Joseph Wilson. Co. G. 3d Sest Sergeant R. C. Smedley, 2d Sergeant H. A. Thompson, 4th Sergeant B. G. Barnett, 1st Corporal I. N. Andress, 2d Corporal W. J. McAllister, 4th Corporal J. D. Jones, Private J. P. Ballard, Private Joseph Harris, James Hill, Jno. Jackson, G. W. Linton, J. W. McCarra, Wm. McLeod, Jno. McLendon, Private S. H. Burgess, Jno. Bennett, Joseph Bell, F. D. Champion, W. S. Coleman, Jno. Catrell, J. F. Folman, T. J. C. Freeman, T. A. Gray, A. B. Graham, J. T. Hightower
re a declaration of rights and the form of a constitution. But the house itself continued its free conversation on these subjects till sunset of the sixth of September. The next day it adjourned for more than seven weeks, that its committee might have time to transact the important business assigned them. On the thirteenth of September, the committee assembled at the new court-house in Boston. Among them were Bowdoin, who was president of the convention; Samuel Adams; John Lowell; Jonathan Jackson of Newburyport, who thought that the liberty which America achieved for itself should prevail without limitation as to color; Parsons, a young lawyer of the greatest promise, from Newburyport; Chap. XVII.} 1779. and Strong of Northampton. John Adams had arrived opportunely from France, to which he did not return till November; and was so far the principal agent in writing out the first draft of the constitution, that it was reputed to be his work. There are no means of distributing
of Mississippi, believing it to be necessary and proper, and should have been bound by their action if my belief had been otherwise; and this brings me to the important point which I wish, on this last occasion, to present to the Senate. It is by this confounding of nullification and secession that the name of a great man, whose ashes now mingle with his mother earth, has been invoked to justify coercion against a seceded State. The phrase, "to execute the laws," was an expression which Gen. Jackson applied to the case of a State refusing to obey the laws while yet a member of the Union. That is not the case which is now presented. The laws are to be executed over the United States, and upon the people of the United States.--They have no relation to any foreign country. It is a perversion of terms, at least it is a great misapprehension of the case, which cites that expression for application to a State which has withdrawn from the Union. You may make war on a foreign State. If
ws. The steamer St. Louis, from New York, was off Pernambuco, December 10, bound to Rio Janeiro. Lady Franklin was a passenger on board. The Buffalo Express says it is fast becoming fashionable in that city for ladies to wear the Balmoral without any dress over it. Ole Bull is at home, or pretty near home, in Sweden, giving concerts that excite as great enthusiasm as nearly twenty years ago. Through the influence of the Emperor and Empress, shops in Paris are now shut on Sunday to a great extent. Jos. N. Cahill and James D. Wright, of Va., have been promoted to the rank of 2d Assistant Engineers, U. S. N. The Daily Banner, a newspaper at Raleigh, N. C., hoist a the name of "Stephen A. Douglas for President for 1864." The Petersburg (Va.) Intelligencer has been sold to R. C. Shell, of Dinwiddie co. Va., for $8,500. James Cook has been elected Mayor of Parkersburg, Va. Jno. Jackson, proprietor of the Philadelphia Sunday Transcript, is dead.
bertson, through the loins, very bad; Privates J. T. Allen, in ankle and knee, bad; H. Bronuneker, in leg, slightly; W. N. Catlin, in foot; R. H. Heign slight. Co C — Killed: 1st Serg't T. M. Lowry, Corp'l T. S. Thomason, Wounded: Capt G. B. Switt, in hand; Corp'l J. E. Jones, in thigh; Privates G. A. Massie, in breast; R. S. Blaylock, in thigh, severely; E. V. Chisholm, in arm, J. B. Harris, slightly, in leg; G. H. Thompson, in arm and leg; J J. Harlow, slight; T. P. Jones, in hand; Jno. Jackson, severely, in breast; J. W. C. Jackson, slightly, in foot; W. D. Kimbrough, slightly; S. F. Kunckles, severely, in breast; J. C. Stone, severely, head and shoulder; P. B. Snead, slightly, in arm; W. G. Goodman, slightly, in neck; Serg't C. Butler, in right eye. Company D--Wounded in skirmish May 14: T. W. Totty, dangerously; R. A. Montague, Sergt. B. A. Hancock, Robt. Harris, M. Trimell, slightly. May 16th--Killed: F. J. S. Tyler. Wounded; Capt. J. T. Vannerson, both legs; Privates