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His first w. Mary was dau. of Ezra Stiles, D. D.; she d. 29 Aug. 1795, a. 28. He m. Sarah, dau. of Oliver Wendell, Esq., of Boston (pub 14 Feb. 1801), and had Mary Jackson, b. 17 June. 1802, m. Dr. Usher Parsons of Providence 23 Sept. 1822; Ann Susan, b. 15 May 1804, m. Rev. Charles W. William of Salem 29 May. 1826; Sarah Lathropmittee to allot lands, Selectman, and representative in 1638. He d. 11 May 1642; his w. Elizabeth survived. Rebecca, a. 36, came to New England 1634. J. Jackson, Richard, (otherwise written Jacson, Jacksone, Jacksonne, Jackesone), res. on the northerly side of Brattle Square. He was Selectman six years, between 1636 and 1l the f. was a farmer, and d. 28 Mar. 1789, a. 86; his w. Deborah d. 31 Mar. 1789, a. 72; and they were buried in one grave. 13. John, s. of Thomas (11), m. Mary Jackson of Newton (pub. 6 Mar. 1761) and had Mary, bap. 29 Dec. 1761; Lydia, bap. 11 Dec. 1763, m. Charles Frothingham 27 Sept. 1786; Sarah, bap. 29 Dec. 1765, m. And
dman 28 Ap. 1721. 6. Elisha, parentage not ascertained, by w. Lucy had Lucy, b. 15 Mar. 1763; Mary, b. 25 Mar. 1765. 7. Abiel, b. at Woodstock, Conn., 24 Dec. 1763; grad. Y. C. 1783; D. D. at Edinburgh; was installed Pastor of the First Church 25 Jan. 1792; his pastoral connection with the church was dissolved 26 Sept 1831. His first w. Mary was dau. of Ezra Stiles, D. D.; she d. 29 Aug. 1795, a. 28. He m. Sarah, dau. of Oliver Wendell, Esq., of Boston (pub 14 Feb. 1801), and had Mary Jackson, b. 17 June. 1802, m. Dr. Usher Parsons of Providence 23 Sept. 1822; Ann Susan, b. 15 May 1804, m. Rev. Charles W. William of Salem 29 May. 1826; Sarah Lathrop, bap. 29 Dec. 1805, d. 6 Nov. 1812; Oliver Wendell, b. 29 Aug. 1809, grad. H. C. 1829, a distinguished physician and poet, res. in Boston; .John, bap. 12 Ap. 1812, grad. H. C. 1832; Ll.B. 1839, res. in Camb. Dr. Holmes was eminent as a theologian and historian. His Annals are a monument of patient research and cautious and accu
J. Jackson, Richard, (otherwise written Jacson, Jacksone, Jacksonne, Jackesone), res. on the northerly side of Brattle Square. He was Selectman six years, between 1636 and 1656;, and Representative nine years, between 1637 and 1662. Mr. Jakson had no children. His w. Isabel d. 12 Feb. 1661, and he m. Elizabeth, wid. of Richard Browne of Chs. 12 May 1662. He d. between 22 June and 10 Oct. 1672, a. 90; His w. Elizabeth d. 11 Jan. 1676-7. His kinsman, John Jackson, was his principal legatee. 2. John, came to New England in 1635, then a. 40, the first permanent settler of Camb. Village (now Newton), as early as 1639; was Deacon of the Church, and res. a short distance easterly from Angier's Corner. By his w. Margaret he had John, b. in England 1633, and d. 17 Oct. 1675; Theodosia, m. Noah Wiswall 14 Dec. 1664, and Samuel Newman of Rehoboth, and d. about 1727; Mary, m. Samuel Truesdale; Grace; Caleb, b. and d. 1645: Hannah, b. 7 June 1646, m. Elijah Kenrick; Abigail, b. 14 Aug
date his wid. Lydia d. in Boston, a. 88. 12. Nathaniel, S. of Samuel (9), m. Deborah Bowman 17 Sept. 1741, and had Eunice, b. 16 Aug. 1742, m. John Ranslow Sigourney 8 Nov. 1764; Nathaniel, b. 10 Ap. 1747, grad. H. C. 1767. and was a physician at New Market, N. H., where he d. in Dec. 1828; Samuel, b. 26 Sept. 1753. Na-Thaniel the f. was a farmer, and d. 28 Mar. 1789, a. 86; his w. Deborah d. 31 Mar. 1789, a. 72; and they were buried in one grave. 13. John, s. of Thomas (11), m. Mary Jackson of Newton (pub. 6 Mar. 1761) and had Mary, bap. 29 Dec. 1761; Lydia, bap. 11 Dec. 1763, m. Charles Frothingham 27 Sept. 1786; Sarah, bap. 29 Dec. 1765, m. Andrew Lopez 19 Nov. 1788; Phebe, bap. 1 Nov. 1767; John, b. 10 Sept. 1769, prob. d. Ap. 1810; Tabitha, b. 9 Ap. 1771; Hannah, b. 20 Ap. 1773; Elizabeth, b. 10 Mar. 1775, d. 6 Nov. 1776; Elizabeth, b. 26 Aug. 1778; Rebecca, b. 16 Aug. 1780, d. unm. 7 Nov. 1854; Thomas, b. 20 May 1783, d. in Boston 20 Jan. 1876. John the f. was a tai
Death of a Congressman. Hon. Wm. M. Cook, of Missouri, representative of the St. Louis district in the Confederate Congress, died in Petersburg, Va., on Tuesday last, at the residence of Mr. D'Arcy Paul. He was one of the Commissioners who came from Missouri to Virginia, before the war, for conference with the authorities here. He was after wards aid to Governor Jackson, and during the war was on the staff of Gen. Sterling Price, and went through several engagements in the West under that commander.--Judge Cook was about forty years of age. He was a native of Norfolk, Va., and a graduate of the University of Virginia. He leaves a widow and seven children in St. Louis. His remains will be interred in Petersburg to-day.
Hustings Court, April 15th --Recorder Caskie and others presiding.--Mary Jackson, the alleged getter up of the recent riot, was examined and sent on before Judge Lyons to be tried for felony. Thomas Samant, who participated in the same affair. was also sent on for trial before the same Court. Benjamin Kemper, charged with breaking into the storehouse of James Eliotts and stealing a lot of boots and shoes, was committed for trial before Judge Lyons. William H. Ross a free negro, was tried for stealing $1,000 in C. S. Treasury notes, from Jos. Stickenburg, and was acquitted. Malvina, a slave, was ordered 15 lashes for stealing $50 from R. B. L. Tighe, her employer.
ns, gives 104,000 men as the former, and the following speculations as to the latter: The rebel movement now in progress towards the North is being made by Gen. Lee's whole army. The advance is led by General Ewell, who is in command of Gen. Jackson's old corps. He has with him two divisions, embracing 18,500 men. The third division of the corps had not come up at last accounts.--Gen. Lee, with Hill's corps and Longstreet's corps, is also moving northward, and will act in conjunction witn, Government stores; Bark Tacony, of Philadelphia, (act destroyed, but changed to a privateer,) M. A. Shindler, Great Egg Harbor, N. J., ballast; Kate Stewart, Philadelphia, (bonded for $7,000) The Coquette is commanded by Lt. Chas. W. Reed, of Jackson, Miss, whose property at that city having been destroyed, has sworn, the Yankees say, to burn every vessel he catches. Lincoln on military arrests. Lincoln has written a letter in reply to the resolutions of the Albany, N. Y., Democratic
The Daily Dispatch: June 22, 1863., [Electronic resource], Confederate Issues in North Carolina. (search)
Forfeited. --Mary Jackson, charged with participating in the riot on the 2d of April, and held to bail to appear before the Mayor on last Saturday, failed to appear because of serious indisposition, and her bond was for feited. The investigation, was then fixed for the 8th of July, by which time, it is hoped, the accused will be ready to answer.
Big Black to impede Johnston's movements. They also represent that great distress prevails-among citizens inside of the enemy's lines. The Yankees have robbed them of all their provisions, and numbers are in a starving condition. Osyka, June 16.--via Mobile 19. --Officers from Port Hudson report that all is safe, and the garrison in good spirits, with provisions for three months. The enemy has made twenty-seven assaults, with a loss of five thousand. Our loss is three hundred. Jackson, June 17--via Mobile 19. --Numerous couriers have arrived from Vicksburg within the past few days. Their reports are stereotyped. Beyond the fact that Grant's sappers and miners are at work to blow up our works, there is nothing new. A courier from Port Hudson, with dispatches to Gen. Johnston, arrived last night. He reports that the garrison is in fine condition and spirits. Banks's force is estimated at 20,000. It is also reported that he has abandoned the idea of storming the p
height and followed, when at a distance of two or three miles they encountered our picket line, which fell back towards the main body. Hill and Longstreet turned upon them and repulsed them with great slaughter. Meantime their retreat to the mountain again was intercepted. Gen. Ewell, who had also fallen back from his position on the left, concealed his man from the observation of the enemy, and when Hill and Longstreet commenced driving them back, moved so as to get in their rear — Jackson like — and cut off their retreat to their fortifications on the mountain, capturing over 50 regiments and 30 pieces of artillery. Though no official confirmation has yet been received here of this report, it obtains very general credence. The enemy attacked our wagon train and convey near Williamsport, Monday evening, but were repulsed, with the less of one hundred prisoners, after two hours or more hard fighting by Gen. Jenkins. The enemy numbered a brigade and eight pieces of artil
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