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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: Franklin (search)
a, published in 1759. The result was a compromise which in the circumstances he regarded as a victory. His interest in the wider questions of imperial policy he exhibited in 1760 by aspersing the advocates of a hasty and inconclusive peace with France in his stinging little skit, Of the Meanes of disposing the enemies to peace, See Writings, ed. Smyth, Vol. IV, pp. 89-95. which he presented as an extract from the work of a Jesuit historian. In 1760, also, he was joint author with Richard Jackson of a notably influential argument for the retention of Canada, The interest of great Britain considered with regard to her colonies; to which was appended his Observations concerning the Increase of mankind, Peopling of countries, etc. In the intervals of business, he sat for his portrait, attended the theatre, played upon the harmonica, experimented with electricity and heat, made a tour of the Low Countries, visited the principal cities of England and Scotland, received honorary degre
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: travellers and observers, 1763-1846 (search)
ter the Louisiana Purchase, the utterance of the Monroe Doctrine announces to the world the position of the United States in the Occident. Meantime internal waterways and highroads have been developed; and subsequently, during the presidency of Jackson, the steam locomotive is introduced. The year 1845 marks the annexation of Texas; and with the cession of New Mexico and California in 1848, the country virtually assumes its present proportions. Almost a century has passed since the nondescrineral range of substance is displayed by circumstantial titles in the Bibliography. Among objects of interest to many were, in the early years of the Republic, the persons of Washington and Jefferson, and, in his time, the picturesque figure of Jackson; and among natural wonders, Niagara Falls, the Rock Bridge of Virginia, and the Mammoth Cave. This, after its discovery by Hutchins in 1809, took its place in the attractions of Kentucky with the furry cap of Boone. The Indians, of course, sup
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
, 231 n. Irving, Ebenezer, 248, 251 Irving, John Treat, 251 Irving, Peter, 220, 248 Irving, Pierre, 259 Irving, Washington, 185, 191, 194, 208, 209, 21O, 233, 236, 237, 238, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 245-259, 264, 272, 276, 309, 310, 311, 318, 324 Irving, William, 246, 247 Isaac Bickerstaff, 111, 233 Isabella, Queen of Spain, 257 Israel Potter, 323 Italian sketch Book, an, 243 J Jack Cade, 222, 224 Jack Tier, 302 Jackson, Andrew, 186, 190, 222, 313 Jackson, Richard, 97 James, William, 348 Jane Talbot, 292 Jay, John, 91, 135, 144, 146, 148, 149, 294 Jefferson, Joseph (elder), 221, 231 Jefferson, (younger), 231 Jefferson, Thomas, 91, 129, 141, 142, 143, 146, 175, 185, 190, 194, 199, 201, 202, 203, 205 Jeffrey, Lord, 90, 248 Jenyns, Soame, 129 Jesus, 268, 353 Jeune Indienne, La, 188 Joan D'arc, 226 John Bull in America, etc., 208 John Oldbug, 234 Johnson, Captain, Edward, 22-23 Johnson, Dr. Samuel (1709-84), 70
Bulkeley. Removed to Concord. Benjamin Burr. Removed to Hartford. John Champney. Remained here. Richard Champney. Remained here. Josiah Cobbett. Removed to Hingham. Edward Collins. Remained here. John Cooper. Remained here. Gilbert Crackbone. Remained here. Francis Griswold. Remained here. Thomas Hayward. Removed to Duxbury. Ralph Hudson. A proprietor; but resided in Boston. Joseph Isaac. Remained here. Richard Jackson. Remained here. John King. Names soon disappeared. John Moore. Remained here. Walter Nichols. Removed to Charlestown. Richard Parke. Remained here. William Patten. Remained here. Richard Rice. Removed to Concord. Nicholas Roberts. Names soon disappeared. John Santley. Names soon disappeared. Nathaniel Sparhawk. Remained here. Comfort Starr. Removed to Duxbury. Gregory Stone. Remained here. William Towne.
icate. Dec. 13, 1641. Agreed that Robert Holmes and John Stedman shall take care for the making of the town-spring, against Mr. Dunster's barn, a sufficient well, with timber and stone, fit for the use of man and watering of cattle. Also Richard Jackson is to be an assistant to them by way of advice, if they shall require it. This spring may still be seen a few feet westerly from the University Press between Brattle and Mount Auburn Streets. Mr. Dunster's barn stood on the northerly sidextended northerly from Vassal Lane on both sides of Menotomy River. It would seem that the Townsmen immediately commenced suit against one of the trespassers. In the Court Files of Middlesex County, 1649-50, is still preserved The Reply of Richard Jackson and Thomas Danforth, plaint., in the behalf of the town of Cambridge, against Samuel Thatcher, of Watertown, def., unto his several answers in the action of the cause for taking away wood out of their bounds. In answer to the allegation tha
l session, commencing Oct. 19, 1664,— The Court being met together and informed that several persons, inhabitants of Cambridge, were at the door and desiring liberty to make known their errand, were called in, and Mr. Edward Jackson, Mr. Richard Jackson, Mr. Edward Oakes, and Deacon Stone, coming before the Court, presented a petition from the inhabitants of Cambridge, which was subscribed by very many hands, in which they testified and declared their good content and satisfaction they toding to theire patent, Cambridg the 17th of the 8. 1664. Charles Chauncy. Edward Oakes. Samll. Andrewe. Jonathan Mitchell. Elijah Corlett. Richard Champny. Edmund Frost. Gregory Stone. John Bridge. John Stedman. ffrancis Whitmor. Richard Jackson. Edward Shephard. Gilbert × Cracbon. John Fisenden. John Cooper. Abraham Erringtoon. Humfry Bradsha. John Gibson. Richard Hassell. Danill Kempster. Thomas × Fox. George × Willis. Thomas × Hall. Richard Dana. Nicolas × Wythe. Thomas
ither again; which made him take a more particular leave than otherwise he would have done. Sixth day, Nov. 10, 1699. Mr. Danforth is entombed about 1/4 of an hour before 4 P. M. Very fair and pleasant day; much company. Bearers: on the right side, Lt-Governor, Mr. Russell, Sewall; left side, Mr. W. Winthrop, Mr. Cook, Col. Phillips. I helped lift the corpse into the tomb, carrying the feet. In the long and perilous conflict on behalf of chartered rights, Gookin and Danforth were supported by their brethren the Deputies from Cambridge, all good men and true. Deacon Edward Collins was Deputy from 1654 to 1670, without intermission; Edward Oakes, 1659, 1660, 1669-1681; Richard Jackson, 1661, 1662; Edward Winship, 1663, 1664, 1681-1686; Edward Jackson, 1665-1668, 1675, 1676; Joseph Cooke, 1671, 1676-1680; Thomas Prentice, 1672-1674; Samuel Champney, 1686, and again, after the Revolution, from 1689 to 1695, when he died in office. Their names should be in perpetual remembrance.
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 15: ecclesiastical History. (search)
d Deacon Cooper, for those families on the west side the common, and for Watertowne lane, as far towards the town as Samuel Hastings. That is, to Ash Street. Thomas Danforth and Thomas Fox, for those families on the east side the common. Richard Jackson and Mr. Stedman, for those families on the west side of the town: Captain Gookin and Elder Frost, for those families on the east side of the town;—Water Street, leading from the meeting-house to the waterside being the partition. Again, Mayuch persons. Hitherto the pastors of the church had dwelt in their own houses; but now it was determined to erect a house, at the public expense, as a parsonage. July 5, 1669, Voted on the affirmative, that the Selectmen and Deacons, and Richard Jackson, and Mr. Stedman, and Mr. Angier, are appointed a committee, to take present care to purchase or build a convenient house for the entertainment of the minister that the Lord may please to send us to make up the breach that his afflicting pro
m Spencer, 1634-1638. John Talcott, 1634-1636. John Steele, 1635. Matthew Allen, 1636. George Cooke, 1636, 1642-1645. Speaker in 1645. Clement Chaplin, 1636. Joseph Cooke, 1636-1641. Nicholas Danforth, 1636, 1637. Richard Jackson, 1637-1639, 1641, 1648, 1653, 1655, 1661, 1662. John Bridge, 1637-1639, 1641. Joseph Isaac, 1638. Gregory Stone, 1638. Samuel Shepard, 1639, 1640, 1644, 1645. Nath. Sparhawk, 1642-1644, 1646, 1647. Edward Goffe, 1646, 1650. 5. Joseph Cooke, 1635-1637, 1639, 1641, 1643, 1645. John Bridge, 1635, 1637-1639, 1641– 1644, 1646, 1647, 1649, 1652. Clement Chaplin, 1635. Nicholas Danforth, 1635-1637. Thomas Hosmer, 1635. William Andrews, 1635, 1640. Richard Jackson, 1636, 1637, 1641, 1644, 1654, 1656. Edward Goffe, 1636, 1637, 1639, 1641, 1643, 1644, 1646-1655. Simon Crosby, 1636, 1638. Barnabas Lamson, 1636. Edward Winship, 1637, 1638, 1642– 1644, 1646, 1648, 1650, 1651, 1662, 1663, 1673,
Historic leaves, volume 3, April, 1904 - January, 1905, Gregory Stone and some of his descendants (search)
nt, as they interpreted it, at the same time avowing their personal loyalty to the King. Here was the first whispering of the spirit which, more than a hundred years later, was heard in full tones in the Declaration of Independence. At a special session, commencing October 19, 1664,— The Court being met together and informed that several persons, inhabitants of Cambridge, were at the door and desiring liberty to make known their errand, were called in, and Mr. Edward Jackson, Mr. Richard Jackson, Mr. Edward Oakes, and Deacon Stone, coming before the Court, presented a petition from the inhabitants of Cambridge which was subscribed by very many hands, in which they testified and declared their good content and satisfaction they took and had in the present government in church and commonwealth, with their resolution to be assisting to and encouraging the same, and humbly desiring all means might be used for the continuance and preservation thereof:— To the honoured Generall
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