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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,296 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 888 4 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 676 0 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 642 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 470 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 418 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 404 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 359 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 356 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 350 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Stonewall Jackson or search for Stonewall Jackson in all documents.

Your search returned 74 results in 19 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Northern opinion of Grant's generalship. (search)
which we can thank the blockade— the determined bravery of the Union forces, and the lack of an able coadjutor like Stonewall Jackson. One can well believe that had Jackson lived a year longer Grant would not only have been defeated, but, as a consJackson lived a year longer Grant would not only have been defeated, but, as a consequence of his stubborn adhesion to a single military idea, pretty nearly destroyed. Grant possessed an advantage over all his predecessors in Virginia, that he never was forced to contend with Jackson. With Jackson taken from one side and SheridaJackson. With Jackson taken from one side and Sheridan added to the other, it ought not to have been so difficult to get the better of Lee.. As it happened, Sheridan's brilliant victory at Cedar Run, a battle gained with equal forces and the most decisive ever fought in Virginia, was all that saved usJackson taken from one side and Sheridan added to the other, it ought not to have been so difficult to get the better of Lee.. As it happened, Sheridan's brilliant victory at Cedar Run, a battle gained with equal forces and the most decisive ever fought in Virginia, was all that saved us at that period. The dry truth of it is that Grant lost more battles in Virginia than he ever won elsewhere. General Grant's tactics evidently succeeded in the West on account of their simplicity. They were not too good for the then undisciplin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
1st.—Marched fifteen miles. Left our bivouac at three o'clock A. M. and halted at two P. M. Here we came up with our wagons, and got our cooking utensils. Rye was issued, and I enjoyed a cup of rye coffee. June 5th.—For the past few days rumors have been afloat in camp of a great battle in Virginia. This morning the news was confirmed. We gained a great victory near Richmond. President Davis and General Lee were on the field, and greatly encouraged the troops by their presence. General Jackson routed Banks, and is said to be approaching Washington. The Marylanders are flocking to his standard by the thousands. It is also reported that General Beauregard has been advised of the intervention of France and England in American affairs. This is news enough for one day. June 7th.—Resumed our march to-day. Left camp at two o'clock P. M., and halted at sunset. Marched about ten miles. Suffered more fatigue than on any previous march. Sunday June 8th.—Left camp this morni
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Contributions to the history of the Confederate Ordnance Department. (search)
inued, after being in a great measure dismantled, and was utilized to get lumber and timber for use elsewhere, and to gather and prepare moss for making saddle-blankets. At Montgomery shops were kept up for the repair of small arms, and for the manufacture of articles of leather, of which some supplies were obtained in that region. There were many other small establishments and depots, some of them connected immediately with the army, as at Dublin, Southwest Va.; Knoxville, Tenn.; and Jackson, Miss. Some shops at Lynchburg, Va., were moved to Danville, near the south line of Virginia, and it grew into a place of some value for repairs, &c. The Ordnance shops at Nashville had been hurriedly transferred to Atlanta, Ga., on the fall of Fort Donelson; and when Atlanta was seriously threatened by the operations of Sherman the Arsenal there, which had become very important, was moved to Columbus, Ga., where there was the nucleus of an Ordnance establishment. Colonel M. H. Wright
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Development of the arsenals, armories and other places of manufacture of Ordnance stores. (search)
inued, after being in a great measure dismantled, and was utilized to get lumber and timber for use elsewhere, and to gather and prepare moss for making saddle-blankets. At Montgomery shops were kept up for the repair of small arms, and for the manufacture of articles of leather, of which some supplies were obtained in that region. There were many other small establishments and depots, some of them connected immediately with the army, as at Dublin, Southwest Va.; Knoxville, Tenn.; and Jackson, Miss. Some shops at Lynchburg, Va., were moved to Danville, near the south line of Virginia, and it grew into a place of some value for repairs, &c. The Ordnance shops at Nashville had been hurriedly transferred to Atlanta, Ga., on the fall of Fort Donelson; and when Atlanta was seriously threatened by the operations of Sherman the Arsenal there, which had become very important, was moved to Columbus, Ga., where there was the nucleus of an Ordnance establishment. Colonel M. H. Wright
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
ruly yours, —— —— —— Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary. we might multiply these letters almost indefinitely; but these must suffice, and if any complain that we have gone into the blowing business we have only to call on our readers to bear us witness that we have not often indulged in that direction, and that the moral of it all is that we want more renewals and new subscribers. A most highly appreciated memento, in the shape of a cane-head made of wood taken from the house in which Stonewall Jackson was born, has been sent us (through Rev. Dr. A. E. Dickinson) by Mr. J. W. Odell, of Clarksburg, West Va. We return our hearty thanks. Jack White, one of the heroes of Sabine Pass, is not dead, as reported in the extract we published in the October number, but is living at Houston, Texas, hale and hearty, as one of our subscribers there, kindly informs us. By the way we have from a Federal officer who participated in the fight at Sabine Pass a very different version of it fr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Within a Stone's throw of independence at Gettysburg. (search)
ng—cannot be carefully studied by the unprejudiced student of history without an overwhelming conviction that if General Lee's orders had been properly carried out at Gettysburg, we would have won that field, crushed General Meade's army, rescued Maryland, captured Washington and Baltimore, and dictated terms of peace on Northern soil. General Lee himself said, with a good deal of feeling, in conversation with some gentlemen in Lexington, Va., not long before his death: If I had had Stonewall Jackson at Gettysburg I should have won there a great victory, and if we had reaped the fruits within our reach, we should have established the Independence of the Confederacy. We verily believe that the verdict of impartial History will be that the Confederates would have won Gettysburg, and Independence, but for the failure of one man. But it is not generally known that just at this crisis England was on the eve of recognizing the Confederacy, and was only prevented from doing so by ou
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lookout Mountain! (search)
proach at the point and on the west slope of the mountain as far as Nickajack trail, a distance of ten miles. At 12 o'clock that night I was ordered by the Major-General to send Cumming's brigade to the base of the mountain to report to Brigadier-General Jackson, and Haggerty's battery of Parrott guns to report to Brigadier-General Anderson, on the right of the line on Missionary Ridge. Early Tuesday morning, the 24th, the passes of the mountain were re-enforced, and at 12 M., in obedience to an order from the Major-General commanding, I sent Pettus's brigade (except the Twenty-third and Thirtieth Alabama regiments) to report to Brigadier-General Jackson, half way down the mountain, leaving me only my own brigade, the Twenty-third and Thirtieth Alabama regiments, —— and battery of Napoleons. The Eighteenth and Twenty-sixth Tennessee regiments were disposed at Powell's and Nickajack trails and the contiguous passes. Powell's trail is seven and Nickajack ten miles from the north p
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Further details of the death of General A. P. Hill. (search)
Further details of the death of General A. P. Hill. Letter from a courier. [At his own earnest request we suppress the name of the gallant young soldier who sends the following letters; but he will have the thanks of all old Confederates, not only for his own contribution, but also for eliciting from Colonel Venable his graceful tribute to the accomplished soldier and chivalric gentleman whose name was among the dying words of both Lee and Jackson.] Richmond, Va., March 21, 1884. Rev. J. William Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.: My Dear Sir,—Some time since I noticed an account of the death of General A. P. Hill, which was written by Sergeant Tucker, of General Hill's staff. Having seen General Hill only a short while before his death, and thinking Sergeant Tucker had left out (unintentionally) some facts that might be interesting to the soldiers, I sent the account to Colonel C. S. Venable, formerly of General R. E. Lee's staff, and I beg he
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Brigadier-General E. W. Pettus of operations at Lookout Mountain. (search)
evenson's division, to report, with three regiments of my command, to Brigadier-General Jackson, commanding at the Craven House. I moved at once with the Twentieth, Forty-sixth Alabama regiments, and at the head of the column I found Brigadier-General Jackson at the point where the road to the Craven House leaves the road leadi as to connect with his line. These facts were communicated by me to Brigadier-General Jackson, with the request that he would come forward, look at the line and giprogress of the fight and to ask his assistance. Captain Smith found Brigadier-General Jackson at the headquarters of Major-General Stevenson, on the top of the mouest of Chattanooga Creek), about one mile and a-half from the fight, where General Jackson informs me he had gone to confer with General Stevenson as to the mode in fter this I went to the road leading down the mountain, and there met Brigadier-General Jackson coming down. He directed me to keep my command where it was and awai
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Wolseley's tribute to Lee and Jackson. (search)
Wolseley's tribute to Lee and Jackson. The great English soldier, Sir Garnet Joseph Wolseley, who is regarded by competent judges as standing at the very head of his profession, wrote last December to an accomplished lady of Mobile, Ala., now residing in New York, a letter worth preserving in our records as the calm, unpredjudiced estimate of a distinguished foreign soldier. We give it in full as follows: war office, London, 8th December, 1883. My Dear Miss S.,—I am very gratefulone of his letters. I believe that when time has calmed down the angry passions of the North, General Lee will be accepted in the United States as the greatest General you have ever had, and second as a patriot only to Washington himself. Stonewall Jackson, I only knew slightly, his name will live forever also in American history when that of Mr. U. S. Grant has been long forgotten, such at least is my humble opinion of these men when viewed by an outside student of military history who has n
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