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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,296 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 888 4 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 676 0 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 642 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 470 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 418 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 404 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 359 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 356 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 350 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Stonewall Jackson or search for Stonewall Jackson in all documents.

Your search returned 54 results in 13 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.8 (search)
f you please, to the field of Manassas, which, after supplying ourselves with all we could carry away, we left late in the afternoon of the 27th of August, 1862. Jackson's troops remained in the place that night and destroyed all the stores (and they were immense) which they could not use. We crossed Bull Run and advanced towards o health and strength. The Colonel forgot them. We remained on the north side of Bull Run for two or three days, not less than eight miles in advance of General Jackson's corps, who, in the mean time, after destroying the stores at Manassas, had taken position near the Stone Bridge, where the battle of July 21, 1861, had beenGeneral Pope had by this time recovered from the stupor into which he had been thrown by Jackson's advance to his rear, and was concentrating his forces to attack Jackson before the arrival of General Lee, who was hastening to his relief with Longstreet's corps. While we were on the north side of Bull Run we had one active, small
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Historical sketch of the Rockbridge artillery, C. S. Army, by a member of the famous battery. (search)
guns were on dry ground near the woods. General Jackson's headquarters were on a hill less than a Return to the Valley. Four days after General Jackson's transfer to the Valley of Virginia, thet that morning accompanied by the rest of General Jackson's little army, not knowing, of course, when shot by some of the cavalry, who, with General Jackson and his staff, had just preceded us. We htruggles, an officer of the staff of General Stonewall Jackson (who was stated to be Major A. S. Pe S. Bell, were captured, with a member of General Jackson's staff. Most of our men, following the done. Because of the small force which General Jackson had in this battle compared with the numbattery, and Carpenter's, were selected by General Jackson for this serious work, under General D. Hand one man wounded. [This battery, with General Jackson, pursued fugitives to Bull Run; General Jptember 17, 1862, and assigned to duty on General Jackson's staff. John J. Williams, transferred[18 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.12 (search)
rolled up in the oil-cloth was the roll-call of the Seventh New York volunteers. I had some letter-paper and stamps, also. About midnight I was aroused by some hard kicks, and when I asked what it meant was told to Get up and hurry, for Stonewall Jackson is in our rear. I said, Stonewall Jackson is in his grave; but the man laughed, and said: You can't stuff that into me; we've heard that before, but don't believe it. We were started for Westminster right away, in the pouring rain, and maStonewall Jackson is in his grave; but the man laughed, and said: You can't stuff that into me; we've heard that before, but don't believe it. We were started for Westminster right away, in the pouring rain, and marched all next day, and besides being wet, tired, and hungry, I was suffering acutely from my wounds, which had no attention until several days afterwards. On the 5th we were marched to Fort McHenry, and on the 6th we were given our first rations, only three hard-tack. Fort Delaware. After two days and nights in the pouring rain we were taken to Fort Delaware, and received our second rations. We were put into barracks, stripped, and searched, even to the seams of our clothing. My wound
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Donaldsonville artillery at the battle of Fredericksburg. (search)
in the County News, by request, from a copy of the original paper.] Since the death of Stonewall Jackson, the Confederacy has sustained no heavier loss than has befallen her in the untimely closecrifices. The noblest and the best freely offer up their lives to it. Let us hope that as Stonewall Jackson's memory is illustrated forever by the glorious victory of Chancellorsville, so the death ary stores. On this occasion, as in the Peninsula, his bold raid was but the precursor of Stonewall Jackson's attack. In both cases it was Stuart who led the way and Jackson who struck the blow, anJackson who struck the blow, and it may be doubted whether the dashing cavalry raid or the brilliant infantry attack had more to do with the successful result. Later in the same year Stuart performed a still greater feat. Whilmongst the heroes of the war his name will worthily take its place beside those of Lee and Stonewall Jackson. Personally, J. E. B. Stuart will be, perhaps, more widely lamented than any Confederate
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Events leading up to the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
thward, if there was any reason to apprehend that the Federal commander intended to renew the attempt to capture the place. Immediately after the withdrawal of General McClellan from the Chickahominy to the James, General Lee had dispatched General Jackson, with his own command and that of General Ewell, followed by that of General A. P. Hill, northward to meet the army of General Pope, then advancing along the line of the Orange and Alexandria railroad. Jackson was instructed to cross the RaJackson was instructed to cross the Rapidan and attack Pope's advance. Among other consequences of the defeat of General McClellan before Richmond, Federal troops had been drawn to his support from various other parts of the country, and among them was a large part of the force under General Burnside, on the North Carolina coast. These troops arrived in Hampton Roads and lay there in transports. Upon them the attention of General Lee was immediately concentrated. Their movements would decide his. If they sailed up the James t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
n defending the right, he had the consolation of knowing that Only those are crowned and sainted, Who with grief have been acquainted. He will not be able to pursuade anyone but himself that he was ever the rival of General Lee and Stonewall Jackson, or that Jackson's fame is factitious and due to his being a Virginian. It is not because he was a Virginian that his monument stands on the bank of the father of waters, and that a great people beyond the sea gave his statue, in bronze, tJackson's fame is factitious and due to his being a Virginian. It is not because he was a Virginian that his monument stands on the bank of the father of waters, and that a great people beyond the sea gave his statue, in bronze, to the State that will cherish his fame as a possession forever. The cavalry. I only propose, however, to review that portion of his book that relates to the management of the cavalry in the Gettysburg campaign. He says that on June 19th, under the impression that the cavalry was to operate with the first corps (Longstreet's) in the general plan, the commander (Stuart) was ordered to follow its withdrawal west of the Blue Ridge and cross the Potomac on its right at Shepherdstown and make
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), First Manassas. (search)
ad suffered in the same proportion, but with ranks unbroken, resolute, and dauntless still, Johnston and Beauregard both were urging and encouraging the troops, and fully exposed to the whole Federal fire, the minie-balls coming thick and fast. Jackson stood near his brigade, with cap drawn close over his eyes, stern and silent, awaiting the catastrophe, and rendered rather more conspicuous by a white handkerchief wound around his left hand, which had been slightly wounded by a bullet. Sucheral line halted, then wavered, wheeling a little to the right, as if to meet this fresh enemy, but their hearts seemed to fail them before that onward rush, and the right of the line began to crumble like a rope of sand. Then it was that I saw Jackson raise his wounded hand and point down to that wavering line. Those worn and tired soldiers needed no second bidding. They knew their time had come at last, and, apparently as fresh as when the battle opened in the morning, those young voluntee
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.25 (search)
g destroyed. Almost a panic. To understand fully the almost-panic effect in these cities, it might be well to say that they had been comparatively free from such a visitation so close at home for about two years; not since the privateer Jefferson Davis was off the coast. But lately rumors had been threatening an attack on the New England coast by the Alabama and Florida. Moreover, this period was the climax of the Confederacy. It was straining every nerve in one grand effort. Stonewall Jackson had made his last, but splendid, march around Hooker's right flank at Chancellorsville, doubling him up, and leaving him hors de combat, and General Lee, with his victorious legions, was marching triumphantly into Pennsylvania. The ironclad Atlanta had been sent out from Savannah, Ga., with a view to raising the blockade and making a raid on the Northern cities, and demonstrations were being made in various directions to tighten the tension and prevent reinforcements from being drawn
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), How the Southern soldiers kept House during the war. (search)
to buy the proud claim that I was a loyal soldier of the Confederate States; that from Big Bethel to Appomattox I was true to her flag and glad to serve her. This shield I shall hang up in my house for my children's children, when dust shall return to dust, and the soul return to the God who gave it. It is not often the privilege of a man to serve his country for years without pay and on half rations. This has been your privilege, my dear comrades. Wear this badge of royalty upon your hearts, while they beat proudly your grand and solemn march to eternity. This is but a small part of life. Let your last days here be your best and brightest days. It matters not what sort of garments cover your proud hearts. Gold is gold, whether in the rocky drift or on fair woman's brow. God weighs actions, not dry goods. Oh! how I love dear old Virginia! the mother of Washington, Jackson, and Lee. Virginia! Virginia! the land of the free, Three cheers for Virginia from mountain to sea.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.33 (search)
Stonewall Jackson's most dreaded foe. [from the Christian Observer Louisville, Ky., November 20, 1895.] Worse than Pope's army. A story never before published, as related by an ex-confederate officer, who is now a resident of Norfolk, Va. About daylight of the day before the second battle of Manassas, I was ordered to report to General T. J. Jackson, with a detail of one hundred men for special duty. Upon arrival at the headquarters and making myself known by presenting the ordeGeneral A. P. Hill came galloping up with his staff. I explained the position to him, and soon saw that he took in the sitution, as he ordered the thirsty squad off. Then he said: Have you orders to burn this building? On my replying that I had not, he went off. Within an hour General Jackson sent me an order to burn the building, and after it was well destroyed, to report to him. This I did. No man got a drink that day. And the foe that Stonewall Jackson most dreaded was powerless for evil.
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