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Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 924 2 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 292 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 220 4 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 168 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 146 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 93 3 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 70 2 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 58 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 55 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 54 10 Browse Search
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Harpers Ferry, 287 Harrison's Landing, Va., 51,356-57 Hatcher's Run, Va., 308,313,392 Hazen, William B., 406 Heintzelman, Samuel P., 265 Hesser, Theodore, 311 Hinks, E. W., 29 Hinson, Joseph, 405 Holmes, Oliver Wendell, 26 Hood, John B., 400,406 Hooker, Joseph, 71, 257, 259-62, 331,338-40 Hospitals, 298-303,308 Hough, John, 263 Howard, Oliver O., 406 Huts, 56-58, 73-89 Ingalls, Rufus, 359,371-72, 375 Irwin, B. J. D., 301 Jackson, Andrew, 18 Jackson, Thomas J., 71 Jeffersonville, Ind., 121 Johnston, Joseph E., 340 Jonahs, 90-94 Jones, Edward F., 36 Kearney, Philip, 254-57 Kelly's Ford, Va., 315 Kenesaw Mountain, 400,404 Kingston, Ga., 400 Lee, Robert E., 198, 291-92,331, 362,367 Letterman, Jonathan, 303,305 Lewis' milk, 125 Lice, 80-82 Lincoln, Abraham, 15-16,18-20, 22, 34, 42, 44-45, 60, 71, 157, 162, 198,250,253,315 Longstreet, James, 296,403 Logan, John, 262-63 Long Island, Mass., 44-45 Lowell, Mass
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Jackson at Harper's Ferry in 1861. (search)
ral Joseph E. Johnston (who had succeeded Colonel Jackson in command on the 23d of May), considerinrnor Letcher's order of April 27th, upon Thomas J. Jackson, colonel commandant, and James W. Massi some papers I had brought from General Lee. Jackson and his adjutant were at a little pine table eted, and I proudly took the roll down to Colonel Jackson with the remark, There, colonel, is the r, making daily reports, night and morning, to Jackson. One Sunday afternoon, a little over a week my sympathies. I urged him to call upon Colonel Jackson that night. It was only twelve miles by ion. I ventured to write a private letter to Jackson, appealing in the strongest terms for the savrvice. The result of his night ride was that Jackson not only relieved him from the obnoxious ordee work of organization on a larger scale than Jackson had attempted. He brigaded the troops, and aond a little affair near Martinsburg in which Jackson captured about forty men of a reconnoitering [16 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., McClellan in West Virginia. (search)
surrender. This was received on the 13th, and Pegram brought in 30 officers and 525 men. McClellan then moved southward himself, following the Staunton road, by which the remnant of Pegram's little force had escaped, and on the 14th occupied Huttonsville. Two regiments of Confederate troops were hastening from Staunton to reenforce Garnett. These were halted at Monterey, east of the principal ridge of the Alleghanies, and upon them the retreating forces rallied. Brigadier-General H. R, Jackson was assigned to command in Garnett's place, and both Governor Letcher and General Lee made strenuous efforts to increase this army to a force sufficient to resume aggressive operations. On McClellan's part nothing further was attempted, till, on the 22d, he was summoned to Washington to assume command of the army, which had retreated to the capital after the panic of the first Bull Run battle. The affair at Rich Mountain and the subsequent movements were among the minor events of a gr
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing armies at the first Bull Run. (search)
dford; Harrison's Battalion; Ten independent companies. Loss: k, 5; w, 8 = 13. Artillery: Battalion Washington Artillery (La.), Major J. B. Walton; Alexandria (Va.) Battery, Capt. Del Kemper; Latham's (Va.) Battery, Capt. H. G. Latham; Loudoun (Va.) Artillery, Capt. Arthur L. Rogers; Shields's (Va.) Battery, Capt. J. C. Shields. Loss: k, 2; w, 8 =10. Total loss Army of the Potomac: k, 105; w, 519; m, 12 = 636. Army of the Shenandoah, General Joseph E. Johnston. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. T. J. Jackson: 2d Va., Col. J. W. Allen; 4th Va., Col. J. F. Preston; 5th Va., Col. Kenton Harper; 27th Va., Lieut.-Col. John Echols; 33d Va., Col. A. C. Cummings. Loss: k, 119; w, 442 = 561. Second Brigade, Col. F. S. Bartow (k): 7th Ga., Col. Lucius J. Gartrell; 8th Ga., Lieut.-Col. W. M. Gardner. Loss: k, 60; w, 293 = 353. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. B. E. Bee (k): 4th Ala., Col. Jones (k), Col. S. R. Gist; 2d Miss., Col. W. C. Falkner; 11th Miss. (2 cos.), Lieut.-Col. P. F. Liddell; 6th N. C.,
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Black Horse cavalry. (search)
e was assigned to duty at the headquarters of Jackson, who was about to make his celebrated flank aCatlett's Station. But the blow delivered by Jackson was a far more serious one; for, in order to nt of twenty of the Black Horse, commanded by Jackson in person, and many prisoners were taken. Noiselessly and swiftly Jackson traversed the country between Hinson's ford and Bristow Station. est of the Black Horse command, remained with Jackson. The lieutenant retraced his steps, and repo the direction of Salem, the track over which Jackson had just passed, and encamped for the night be, for the rest of Stuart's cavalry were with Jackson. He dashed into the village, but was soon dried virtue and binding up its wounds, Lee and Jackson, sitting on a fallen tree, were engaged in cld the Potomac. From the crest of a high hill Jackson saw the retreating columns, and, at the same e thrown out to protect the Federal retreat. Jackson immediately attacked it, but with an inadequa[4 more...]
Preface. The cause for which General Jackson fought and died, has been overthrown. But it is believed that this fact hit has been entrusted to me by the widow and family of General Jackson, supported by the urgency of his successor in command,ullest collection of materials. The correspondence of General Jackson with his family, his pastor, and his most prominent frons of the battle-fields and the theatre of war where General Jackson acted, from the topographical department of the same gyed in his campaigns. The prominent characteristic of General Jackson was his scrupulous truthfulness. This Life has been wy would I declare, that in relating the share borne by General Jackson's comrades and subordinates in his campaigns, I have bare unfolded in my book as the animating principles of General Jackson, they must inevitably remember, that this Southern peod beneficial, to leave this explication and defence of General Jackson's resistance to the Federal Government, as it was writ
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 1: parentage, and Early years. (search)
Chapter 1: parentage, and Early years. The family from which General Jackson came, was founded in Western Virginia by John Jackson, an emigrant from London. His stock was Scotch-Irish; and it is most probable that John Jackson himself was removed by his parents from the north of Ireland to London, in his second year. Nearly fifty years after he left England, his son, Colonel George Jackson, while a member of the Congress of the United States, formed a friendship with the celebrated Andrew Jackson of Tennessee, afterwards the victor of New Orleans, and President; and the two traced their ancestry up to the same parish near Londonderry. Although no more intimate relationship could be established between the families, such a tie is rendered probable by their marked resemblance in energy and courage, as illustrated not only in the career of the two great commanders who have made the name immortal, but of other members of their houses. John Jackson was brought up in London, and b
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 10: Kernstown. (search)
ch were afterwards showered so thickly upon him. The following Resolutions of Thanks were unanimously passed: 1. Resolved by the Congress of the Confederate States, That the thanks of Congress are due, and are hereby tendered to Major General Thomas J. Jackson, and the officers and men under his command, for gallant and meritorious services, in a successful engagement with a greatly superior force of the enemy, near Kernstown, Frederick Co., Va., on the 23d day of March, 1862. 2. Resolvved by the Congress of the Confederate States, That the thanks of Congress are due, and are hereby tendered to Major General Thomas J. Jackson, and the officers and men under his command, for gallant and meritorious services, in a successful engagement with a greatly superior force of the enemy, near Kernstown, Frederick Co., Va., on the 23d day of March, 1862. 2. Resolved, That these resolutions be communicated by the Secretary of War to Major General Jackson, and by him to his command.
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 11: McDowell. (search)
rted, according to their hypothesis, that General Jackson was a mere fighter, and no strategist, thed no knowledge of the true direction of General Jackson's movement. The object of the latter waspracticable. After careful explorations, General Jackson determined to ascend the eastern or rightch of the road with a murderous fire. Generals Jackson and Johnson having cautiously ascended tht, to attain the crest of the hills where General Jackson's line was formed, was signally and effecbones, compelled him to leave the field. General Jackson paid him the following merited tribute inn on either side; but among those captured by Jackson was a Colonel of an Ohio regiment. Some Quarl Milroy was supposed to be 8,000 men. Of General Jackson's, about 6,000, or only half his force, w. When the morning of Monday arrived, General Jackson resolved to discontinue his pursuit of Mi11th, requiring his return. The same day General Jackson sent a courier to General Ewell, to annou[37 more...]
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 12: Winchester. (search)
all other movements were auxiliary to it. General Jackson's command was expected to concur in secuinst Richmond; or even to the peninsula. General Jackson was steadfast in the opinion, that Banks'sville. But he had just been informed by General Jackson, that he was hastening back, to effect a f the cannon, and was seen no more. When General Jackson sent orders to the artillery and rear briof a general retreat upon Winchester. General Jackson now advanced upon Middletown, confident t their knapsacks, and abandoned them. General Jackson was now convinced that the larger game wa The battle had now reached a stage which General Jackson perceived to be critical; the hour for stonned their well-worn uniforms again. General Jackson was not the man to lose the opportunitiesheavy force. Upon being advised of this, General Jackson ordered General Ewell with reinforcementsictory at Winchester, that he wrote thus to Mrs. Jackson: Winchester, May 26th, 1862. An eve[45 more...]
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