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Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 924 2 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 292 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 220 4 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 168 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 146 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 93 3 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 70 2 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 58 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 55 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 54 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A.. You can also browse the collection for Thomas J. Jackson or search for Thomas J. Jackson in all documents.

Your search returned 86 results in 24 document sections:

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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Autobiographical sketch. (search)
he died in the year 1832, leaving ten children surviving her, I being the third child and second son. She was a most estimable lady, and her death was not only the source of the deepest grief to her immediate family, but caused universal regret in the whole circle of her acquaintances. Until I was sixteen I enjoyed the benefit of the best schools in my region of country and received the usual instruction in the dead languages and elementary mathematics. In the spring of 1833, while General Jackson was President, I received, through the agency of our member of Congress, the Hon. N. H. Claiborne, an appointment as cadet in the United States Military Academy at West Point. I repaired to the Academy at the end of May and was admitted about the first of June in the same year. I went through the usual course and graduated in the usual time, in June, 1837. There was nothing worthy of particular note in my career at West Point. I was never a very good student, and was sometimes qu
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 2: fight at Blackburn's Ford. (search)
rd, and he proceeded to inform us of his plans for the next day. He told us that, at his instance, the Government at Richmond had ordered General Johnston to move, from the Shenandoah Valley with his whole force to co-operate with ours; and that the General was then on his march directly across the Blue Ridge, and would probably attack the enemy's right flank very early the next morning, while we were to fall upon his left flank. Before he finished the statement of his plans, Brigadier General Thomas J. Jackson, subsequently famous as Stonewall Jackson, entered the room and reported to General Beauregard that he had just arrived from General Johnston's army, by the way of the Manassas Gap Railroad, with his brigade, about 2500 strong. This information took General Beauregard by surprise, and he inquired of General Jackson if General Johnston would not march the rest of his command on the direct road so as to get on the enemy's right flank. General Jackson replied that he thought
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 4: details of the battle of Manassas. (search)
ave been the case had not Bee arrived to the assistance of Evans when he did and stayed the progress of the enemy by his stubborn resistance. When Bee and Evans were forced back across the Warrenton Pike, the day would have been lost had not Jackson arrived most opportunely and furnished them a barrier behind which to re-form. From the beginning our batteries rendered most essential service, and the infantry would probably have been overpowered but for their well directed fire. The arrivhad been burned, and the nearest ford to Washington, over which at low water it is possible for infantry to pass, is White's Ford, several miles above Leesburg, and forty miles from Washington. This was then an obscure ford, where, in 1862, General Jackson had to have the banks dug down before our wagons and artillery could cross, and then the canal on the northern bank had to be bridged. We had nothing in the shape of pontoons, and it would have been impossible to have obtained them in any r
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 5: operations along Bull Run. (search)
place was organized into four divisions of three brigades each and two corps. Bonham's brigade was attached to Van Dorn's division, and the command of the other divisions was given to Major Generals G. W. Smith, Longstreet, and E. Kirby Smith, respectively. Van Dorn's and Longstreet's divisions constituted the first corps under General Beauregard, and the other two divisions constituted the second corps under the temporary command of Major General G. W. Smith. About the same time, General Jackson, with the rank of Major General, was sent to the valley with his old brigade, and the 22nd of October an order was issued from the Adjutant General's office at Richmond, establishing the Department of Northern Virginia, composed of the Valley district, the Potomac district, and the Aquia district, under the command of General Johnston; the districts being assigned to the command of Major General Jafkson, GeneraMl Beauregard, and Major General Holmes, in the order in which they are named
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 8: battles around Richmond. (search)
d some reinforcements from the South; and General Jackson (after his brilliant campaign in the vallrred from the army. The party states he left Jackson, Whiting, and Ewell, fifteen brigades (a) at Some reports place ten thousand rebels under Jackson at Gordonsville; others that his force is at but that the report was to be circulated that Jackson had gone to Richmond in order to mislead. Thch dispatch and secrecy, that the approach of Jackson towards Washington was looked for by the auth morning he gave me an order to report to General Jackson for the purpose of being assigned temporato James River, where I found the head of General Jackson's column. I rode forward and found the Gthe enemy's position. On reporting to General Jackson, he directed his adjutant general to writ, and he sent information of that fact to General Jackson. Early in the morning a captain of Huo large, as it was based on the idea that General Jackson's force was stronger than it really was. [3 more...]
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 9: battle of Cedar Run. (search)
heir country, when General Lee sent Stonewall Jackson to look after the redoubtable warrior. Afisions were ordered to Gordonsville under General Jackson, and, taking the lead, Ewell's division ason County and at Orange Court-House. General Jackson ordered a forward movement to be made on Shortly after noon, Captain Pendleton, of General Jackson's staff, came with an order from the Geneosition, and the information was given to General Jackson who had now arrived on the field. Afterlapped my right and I sent a request to General Jackson for a brigade to put on that flank, whichny further operations. During the night, General Jackson ascertained that Pope's whole army had cos that the truce was requested by us, but General Jackson says it was applied for by the enemy, and6 killed and 145 wounded, and the loss in General Jackson's whole command was 223 killed, 1,060 wouion, was attached to Jackson's division. General Jackson's command, as now constituted, was compos
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 10: operations on the Rappahannock. (search)
s on the Rappahannock. The presence of General Jackson in the vicinity of Gordonsville, again be command at Aquia Creek. It is reported that Jackson is moving north with a very large force. d the Rapidan-Longstreet at Raccoon Ford, and Jackson at Somerville Ford,--the cavalry having precem the river, with a note for General Ewell or Jackson, whichever might be first met with, stating tlivered, I received a verbal message from General Jackson, which had been given across the river atn of this message, I received a note from General Jackson, in reply to mine, containing the same inver to Great Run (the creek alluded to by General Jackson). Colonel Douglas, on crossing the morninthe creek. Some time during the morning, General Jackson sent over an officer familiar with the cg in his front; and I sent a messenger to General Jackson, after dark, with information of the condon, for it would have been impossible for General Jackson to have crossed his troops in time to arr[1 more...]
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 11: capture of Manassas Junction. (search)
The captured correspondence showed that Pope was being reinforced from the Kanawha Valley and also from McClellan's army, and General Lee determined to send General Jackson to the enemy's rear, to cut the railroad, so as to destroy his communications and bring on a general engagement before the whole of the approaching reinforcem to him at Manassas Junction this morning, and the two other divisions of Jackson's command were ordered to the same place. General Ewell had been ordered by General Jackson to remain at Bristow with his three remaining brigades to check any advance from Pope's army along the railroad, but, if the enemy appeared in heavy force, toeasily have turned our flank by moving a force on the ridge to our right, which he appeared to be doing, General Ewell determined to retire in accordance with General Jackson's instructions. The order for the withdrawal across Broad Run was given, and I was directed to cover it with my brigade. At this time the Louisiana regim
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 12: the affair at Groveton. (search)
having become evident that Pope had found it necessary to look after his lines of retreat, and was moving his whole army back for the purpose of falling upon General Jackson's comparatively small force, the latter determined to move to the left so as to be in a position to unite with the right wing of General Lee's army under Longal Ewell moved forward to attack him, when a fierce and sanguinary engagement took place. While it was raging, and just before dark, I received an order from General Jackson, through one of his staff officers, to advance to the front, which I complied with at once, my own brigade in line of battle being followed by that of Hays. While advancing, I received an order to send two regiments to the right to General Jackson, and I detached the 44th and 49th Virginia under Colonel Smith for that purpose. On reaching the railroad cut in my forward movement, I found it so deep that it was impossible to cross it, and I had therefore to move to the right by flank
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 13: second battle of Manassas. (search)
tion of Ewell's division was changed, and General Jackson in person ordered me to move with Hays' ba, under Colonel Walker, were detached by General Jackson's order and placed in position south of tmyself with driving the enemy from it, as General Jackson's orders were not to advance but hold thy an explosive ball from a sharpshooter. General Jackson had accomplished his purpose of resistingmns. Pope, in his report, claims that General Jackson was retreating through Thoroughfare Gap, is attack arrested this retreat and compelled Jackson to take position to defend himself, and that this was taking place, the other divisions of Jackson were ordered to advance, and my brigade was s to come up, as I was ahead of them, when General Jackson rode up and ordered me to move by my lefted quarter, and I immediately sent to let General Jackson know the fact, as it would have been foll enemy. A message was soon received from General Jackson, stating that the fire very probably came
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