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hos. L. Moore,D. H. Dyke, F. M. Robey,J. T. Mahan, H. B. Littlepage,Va. Newton, H. H. MarmadukeW. F. Clayton, R. S. Flag,T. Boughman, R. A. Camm,H. St. G. T. Brooke, F. T. Chew,Wm. Carroll, John T. Walker,Barron Carter, J. A. Merriwether,J. M. Gardner, R. H. Bacot,Thos. S. Garrett, H. C. Holt,W. D. Goode, W. C. Hutter,D. G. McClintoc, Wm. P. Mason,W. R. Mays, I. C. Holcome,C. Meyer, D. M. Scales,J. M. Morgan, E. J. McDermott,R. J. Moses, Jr., D. A. Telfair,J. A. Peters, W. C. Jackson,Jeff. Phelps, W. W. Read,C. T. Sevier, Daniel Carroll,G. W. Sparks, A. S. Worth,J. M. Stafford, A. P. Bierne,H. L. Vaughn, S. S. Gregory,L. H. Washington, Daniel Trigg,C. K. Mallory, Jr., John R. Price,J. B. Ratcliffe, H. S. Cooke,J. W. Pegram, J. C. Long,G. T. Sinclair, Jr., H. C. McDaniel,M. H. Ruggles, W. F. Robinson,F. M. Harris, F. M. Thomas,W. H. Vernon, W. W. Wilkinson,Wm. Anshew, R. Flournoy,F. S. Hunter, J. S. Baldwin,L. R. Rootes, T. M. Berrien,Clarence Cary, O
. (910) Col. B. J. Lea reports Robertson's company scouting between Clifton and Savannah, February 26, 1862. (918) Beauregard's confidential notes, March 4th, say that Robertson's cavalry is to remain at Henderson. Vol. X, Part 2—(408) Col. W. C. Jackson asks for Robertson's cavalry to be sent to Trenton, Tenn., April 10, 1862. Vol. Xv—(19) General Van Dorn mentions cavalry escort under Lieutenant Bradley, Company A, in defenses of Vicksburg, 1862. Vol. XVI, Part 1—(899) Commended in 5) Field returns, Wharton's cavalry, 156 effective, December 30, 1862. Company A, Captain Bradley. Vol. XVII, Part 2-(661) Acting as cavalry escort, General Van Dorn's troops, July, 1862; 36 present. (814-847) Acting as cavalry escort for Colonel Jackson's corps, General Pemberton's troops, December, 1862; 29 present. First Confederate regiment. Vol. XX,—(16) Reported as with Wheeler's cavalry at Lavergne, November 27, 1862. (329) Mentioned in Major Collins' (Union) report o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Terry's Brigade, formerly John M. Jones's. (search)
e J. R. Miller, Geo. Robinson, Wm. Lovitt, Private John Dees, Julius Mills, V. Civils. Co. K. Corporal B. S. Best, Private Wm. Baibin, E. M. Sauls, Private S. W. Pate, Willie Thompson. [103] Forty-sixth North Carolina Regiment. Field, Staff and Band. Sergeant-Major Thomas H. Wright, Mus'n C. W. Rogers, Q. M. Sergeant J. L. Carroll, John Miller, Hosp'l Steward T. C. Hussey, J. A. McBryde, Mus'n H. H. Heflin, W. I. Smith, A. A. Teagan, Mus'n W. C. Jackson, M. I. McPhaul, G. W. Riddle. Co. A. 1st Sergeant D. A. Meares, 1st Corporal J. J. Howell, Private James Holeman, Private T. P. Joyce, L. C. Phillips, B. Messinger. Co. B. Bassinger, Private L. Lane, Ferry, Fred Waller. Private Joseph Bassinger T. L. Terry, Co. C. Private M. J. Vanlandigham. Co. E. 5th Sergeant John Mitchell, 1st Corporal F. Harris, Private John Forsythe Paul Gooch Private C. E. Jeffries, L. Meadows, R. H. Oakley, C. R. Tho
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.a monument to Jackson, &c. Charlestown, Jefferson Co., Va., May 28, 1861. I returned form Camp Lee, in Berkeley county, within nine miles of the Pennsylvania line, and opposite Williamsport, Md.,) at a late hour yesterday evening. I had the pleasure of passing the first Sabbath of . My main design, in this letter, is to tell you of the intense admiration expressed in camp, and in all the households I have visited, for the heroic act of Jackson in shooting down the violator of his homestead castle, even when he knew that instant death to himself was the forfeit. And the tragic end of the Zouave, who brocurrences in that contest between the rival flags, which is now fully inaugurated on the classic plains of noble old Fairfax and Alexandria. A subscription, I am told, is in circulation at Camp Lee for the purpose of erecting a monument to Jackson, the victim of the Northern Zouaves — the first Virginia martyr. L. E. H.
he proposition remains true that the South has never been the theatre of a successful invasion. The mere climate and distances traversed destroyed utterly the magnificent column of De Soto. It is a remarkable fact that the only wars against the Indians which cost the whites regular and protracted campaigns were those in the South. How many years of fighting, how many thousands of lives and millions of dollars did the Seminole war cost the United States? It required all the genius of Jackson and all the skill and hardihood of his brave Tennessee and Kentucky riflemen, exerted for some years, to put down the Indians of Georgia and Alabama. What was the Black Hawk war in the Northwest to the Seminole and Creek wars in the South? It would have required the slow genius of Scott as many years to conquer the Southern tribes as it took him days to end the little affair of Black Hawk. The difficult, arduous, costly, and protracted campaigns against the Southern Indian tribes, teach t
"Violent Temper." The Northern papers speak of the noble Jackson, who slew the ruffian Ellsworth, as a man of "violent temper," leaving it to be inferred that his mode of meeting the invader will prove an exceptional one. This is a delusion which can only be corrected by making a series of experiments upon the Confederate Flag. Mr. Jackson, as all who know him will testify, was one of the most amiable and exemplary of gentlemen, and his "violent temper" the stern spirit of a freeman, wh the noble Jackson, who slew the ruffian Ellsworth, as a man of "violent temper," leaving it to be inferred that his mode of meeting the invader will prove an exceptional one. This is a delusion which can only be corrected by making a series of experiments upon the Confederate Flag. Mr. Jackson, as all who know him will testify, was one of the most amiable and exemplary of gentlemen, and his "violent temper" the stern spirit of a freeman, which animates every soldier upon the Southern soil.
h of May, 1861. Acting Midshipman James C. Long, from the 15th of May, 1861. Acting Midshipman J. M. Spencer, from the 21st of April, 1861. Acting Midshipman James E. Fiske, from the 16th of April, 1861. Acting Midshipman Charles K. King, Jr., from the 20th of April, 1861. Acting Midshipman R. S. Floyd, from the 20th of April, 1861. Acting Midshipman Daniel Trigg, from the 20th of April, 1861. Acting Midshipman M. M. Benton, from the 20th of April, 1861. Acting Midshipman W. C. Jackson, from the 20th of April, 1861. Acting Midshipman R. A. Camm, from the 20th of April, 1861. Acting Midshipman F. L. Chew, from the 20th of April, 1861. Acting Midshipman J. S. Claybrook, from the 20th of April, 1861. Acting Midshipman A. P. Bevine, from the 20th of April, 1861. Acting Midshipman H. C. Holt, from the 20th of April, 1861. Acting Midshipman Daniel Carroll, from the 20th of April, 1861. Acting Midshipman Wm. C. Hutter, from the 20th of April, 18
Mobile Blockaded-subscription for Jackson's family. Mobile. May 27. --A U. S. war steamer commenced the blockade of our harbor yesterday morning. Fort Morgan welcomed the steamer by displaying the U. S. flag with Union down from the same staff with the Confederate flag, and under the latter. A subscription has been opened here for the benefit of the family of Jackson, the Alexandria landlord, who killed Ellsworth. The amount has reached a thousand dollars.
he laws of war by the North, there shall be instant retribution as near in kind as possible by the Southern Government. The war began in a spirit and with declarations that would have warranted the South at the start in hanging out the black flag, and in neither giving nor asking quarter. The infernal beastliness openly proclaimed in the streets of New York and the bellish cruelties threatened by the Yankee Congress warranted such a resistance on the part of the South as that to which Jackson sounded the key note when he shot down Ellsworth in Alexandria. The Grand Army scathe to Manassas with handcuffs and halters, and, if they had succeeded in that battle, the citizens of Richmond and of all Virginia would soon have understood the purposes for which those instruments were intended. It is true that sobered by defeat, they have since that time disclaimed sundry brutalities, so shockingly beastly that the whole world cried out against them, but have they ever relinquished their
a stock. He is of the Kentucky Pope family, which emigrated from Virginia. It may be all the more grateful to the malignant Government at Washington in ordering him to Virginia, that this officer is thus descended. But the fact will, if it have any effect at all, only nerve the arm of our gallant and true Southern men to strike the surer and heavier blow when they meet him. General Pope commanded in Northern Missouri, and was more distinguished for his severity and tyranny towards those who fell in his power than for generalship. Lincoln possibly thinks these traits amongst the highest military attributes, and selects him to conquer Virginia. The Northern press say he is the man to meet Jackson. Well Stearwall will be glad to give the last grand commander with "three divisions" a chance for "existence" He has wound up the fame of no less than four Generals in the Valley, and, as misery loves company, he is prepared to comfort them by sending another to herd with them.
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