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a.--the rebel blockade-runner Britannia was captured by the National gunboat Santiago de Cuba.--at Baltimore, Md., the following order was issued by the General Commanding: Until further orders, the citizens of Baltimore city and county are prohibited from keeping arms in their houses unless enrolled in volunteer companies for the defence of their homes. The dwellings of citizens were visited by the Provost-Marshal and the police, for arms, in accordance with this order. General William Jackson, with one thousand seven hundred men, and two pieces of artillery, attacked the Union troops at Beverly, Va., but was repulsed and routed with some loss. The rebels expected to make an easy prize of the garrison, which contained the Tenth Virginia infantry, Captain Ewing's battery, and one company of cavalry, under the command of Colonel Harris, of the Tenth Virginia, who was ordered by General Averill to hold the place until he could reach him with reinforcements, which he did; b
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
els commit in failing to notice the gallant tars who, in all the wars which the United States has had with foreign nations, have performed acts of heroism that could not be excelled by the bravest officers. Lieutenant Lamson shows a praiseworthy example by commending the deeds of his gallant sailors as well as those of his officers. Henry Thielberg, Robert Jourdan and John Sullivan, seamen; Robert Woods, boatswain's-mate; Quartermaster De Lunn; Third-Assistant Engineer, John Healey; William Jackson and James Lody (both colored), are all handsomely spoken of. They, no doubt, received medals (the highest reward a sailor can aspire to), but let their names go down in history as part of the gallant band who so nobly sustained the reputation of the Navy on April 14th, 1863, the anniversary of the day when Sumter, battered and torn, had to lower her flag to those who gave the first stab to our free institutions. Another one of the events of this expedition, which General Getty allude
rd from. John H. Finley, Captain Company 4, Sixty-ninth. Indianapolis, Ind., September 8. To Colonel Korff : The following is a report of company F, Sixty-ninth regiment Indiana volunteers: List of paroled prisoners.--Capt. Lewis K. Harris, First Lieut. Jos. Jackson, Second Lieut. George Thompson, First Sergt. Oliver S. Plummer, Second Sergt. William Reeves, Third Sergt. Wm. H. Williams, Fourth Sergt. Solomon Harter, Fifth Sergt. James S. Bolander. Privates — David Murphy, William Jackson, Benjamin Mathews, Mathew Jellson, George W. Chenworth, J. W. Newman, Edward Harlan, S. B. Oneard, Enoch Fields, E. Lambert, J. Marshall, William Mattchet, Harlan Castle, J. F. Middleton, Abner Page, A. Grollet, William Cox, Cornelius Vannuyse, William R. Anderson, William Hayward, Moses Conklin, J. W. Clark, H. K. Jackson, J. F. Moore, W. H. Harris, E. Pedan, James Dunn, J. W. Jackson, M. Pinney, W. Little, H. M. Murphy, H. Lamb, Allen Crave, J. L. Lambert, G. W. Ross, W. Peaden, F. M.
rd from. John H. Finley, Captain Company 4, Sixty-ninth. Indianapolis, Ind., September 8. To Colonel Korff : The following is a report of company F, Sixty-ninth regiment Indiana volunteers: List of paroled prisoners.--Capt. Lewis K. Harris, First Lieut. Jos. Jackson, Second Lieut. George Thompson, First Sergt. Oliver S. Plummer, Second Sergt. William Reeves, Third Sergt. Wm. H. Williams, Fourth Sergt. Solomon Harter, Fifth Sergt. James S. Bolander. Privates — David Murphy, William Jackson, Benjamin Mathews, Mathew Jellson, George W. Chenworth, J. W. Newman, Edward Harlan, S. B. Oneard, Enoch Fields, E. Lambert, J. Marshall, William Mattchet, Harlan Castle, J. F. Middleton, Abner Page, A. Grollet, William Cox, Cornelius Vannuyse, William R. Anderson, William Hayward, Moses Conklin, J. W. Clark, H. K. Jackson, J. F. Moore, W. H. Harris, E. Pedan, James Dunn, J. W. Jackson, M. Pinney, W. Little, H. M. Murphy, H. Lamb, Allen Crave, J. L. Lambert, G. W. Ross, W. Peaden, F. M.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Constitution of the United States (search)
vention assembled at the appointed time (May 14), but only one-half the States were then represented. The remainder did not all arrive before May 24. Washington, who was a delegate from Virginia, was chosen president of the convention, and William Jackson, one of his most intimate friends, was made secretary. Edmund Randolph, of Virginia, opened the proceedings by a carefully prepared speech, in which the defects of the existing Constitution were pointed out. At its conclusion he offered fif John Blair, James Madison, Jr. North Carolina. Wm. Blount, Hugh Williamson, Richd. Dobbs Spaight. South Carolina. J. Rutledge, Charles Pinckney, Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, Pierce Butler. Georgia. William Few, Abr. Baldwin. Attest: William Jackson, Secretary. Amendments to the Constitution of the United States. The following amendments were proposed at the first session of the First Congress of the United States, which was begun and held at the city of New York on the 4th of Ma
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Crawford, William Harris 1772- (search)
Statesman; born in Amherst county, Va., Feb. 24, 1772; taught school several years and became a lawyer, beginning practice in Lexington, Ga., in 1799. He compiled the first digest of the laws of Georgia, published in 1802: was a member of his State legislature from 1803 to 1807; was United States Senator from 1807 to 1813, in which body he was regarded as its ablest member. In 1813 he was sent as United States minister to France, and on his return (1815) was appointed Secretary of War; but in October, 1816, he was transferred to the Treasury Department, which post he held until 1825, when he was defeated as Democratic candidate for the Presidency, having been nominated the previous year by a congressional caucus. He had four other candidates to oppose— Adams, Calhoun, Jackson, and Clay. At about that time his health failed, and he never fully recovered it. He became a circuit judge in Georgia, and was warmly opposed to nullification. He died near Elberton, Ga., Sept. 18, 183
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Credit Mobilier, (search)
nd excited the Indians to ravage the frontiers of those States. A peace was concluded with the Creeks by Washington in 1790; yet some of them joined the Cherokees in incursions into Tennessee in 1792. Another treaty was made in 1796, and in 1802 they began to cede lands in the United States. But when the War of 1812 broke out they joined their old friends, the English; and by an awful massacre at Fort Mims, in August, 1813, they aroused the Western people to vengeance. Troops led by General Jackson and others entered the Creek country; and in 1813 they ravaged the finest portion of it, destroyed the towns, slew or captured 2,000 Creek warriors, thoroughly subdued them, and, in fact, destroyed the nation. Their last stand against the United States troops was made at Horseshoe Bend in March, 1814. Some of them had already settled in Louisiana, and finally in Texas, where they remained until 1872, when Fort Mims (from an old print). the government took steps to reunite the nation
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Crockett, David 1786- (search)
Crockett, David 1786- Pioneer; born in Limestone, Greene co., Tenn., Aug. 17, 1786. With little education, he became a noted hunter in his early life; served under Jackson in the Creek War; was a member of Congress from 1828 to 1834, and removed to Texas in the latter year, where he became zealously engaged in the war for Texan independence. While fighting for the defence of the Alamo (q. v.) he was captured and put to death by order of Santa Ana, March 6, 1836.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cross Keys, action at (search)
t of the Confederates. For this purpose McDowell sent a force over the Blue Ridge, to intercept them if they should retreat, and Fremont pressed on from the west towards Strasburg with the same object in view. Perceiving the threatened danger, Jackson fled up the valley with his whole force, hotly pursued by the Nationals, and at Cross Keys, beyond Harrisonburg, Fremont overtook Ewell, when a sharp but indecisive battle occurred. Ewell had about 5,000 men, strongly posted. There he was attaur o'clock the whole National line was ordered to fall back at the moment when Milroy had pierced Ewell's centre, and was almost up to his guns. Milroy obeyed the order, but with great reluctance, for he felt sure of victory. The Confederates occupied the battle-field that night, and the Nationals rested within their first line until morning, when Ewell was called to aid Jackson beyond the Shenandoah River. The National loss in the battle was 664, of which two-thirds fell in Stahl's brigade.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Curtis, George William 1824- (search)
r under Madison and the fusion of parties under Monroe, but which swelled again into a furious torrent as the later parties took form. John Quincy Adams adhered, with the tough tenacity of his father's son, to the best principles of all his predecessors. He followed Washington, and observed the spirit of the Constitution in refusing to remove for ally reason but official misconduct or incapacity. But he knew well what was coming, and with characteristically stinging sarcasm he called General Jackson's inaugural address a threat of reform. With Jackson's administration in 1830 the deluge of the spoils system burst over our national politics. Sixteen years later, Mr. Buchanan said, in a public speech, that General Taylor would be faithless to the Whig party if he did not proscribe Democrats. So high the deluge had risen which has ravaged and wasted our politics ever since, and the danger will be stayed only when every President, leaning upon the law, shall stand fast where John Qu
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