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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for H. Melville Jackson or search for H. Melville Jackson in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
fficer or private. I do not purpose to explain them now; I will do so in the future. I merely desire to furnish a connected narrative of historical facts concerning the Maryland Line in the Confederate army. Our cause in history. By Rev. H. Melville Jackson, of Richmond. [The following eloquent response to a toast at the Howitzers's Banquet in Richmond, Dec. 13th 1882, takes a view of our cause in History that is hopeful, and well worthy of preservation. It only needs to be emphasized,ely in its consecrated coronet of sorrow, and it wins the sympathy of the heart and of history. * * * The triumphs of might are transient—they pass and are forgotten—the sufferings of right are graven deepest on the chronicle of nations. Rev. H. M. Jackson responded as follows, amidst frequent applause: Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen.—I esteem myself highly honored in being permitted to mingle with you on this festal occasion, to share with you in the reminiscence of events in which I had no p<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Our cause in history. (search)
Our cause in history. By Rev. H. Melville Jackson, of Richmond. [The following eloquent response to a toast at the Howitzers's Banquet in Richmond, Dec. 13th 1882, takes a view of our cause in History that is hopeful, and well worthy of preservation. It only needs to be emphasized, that we must see to it, that the facts are preserved.] Toast-our cause in history. Sentiment.—A land without ruins is a land without memories—a land without memories is a land without history. A land thaely in its consecrated coronet of sorrow, and it wins the sympathy of the heart and of history. * * * The triumphs of might are transient—they pass and are forgotten—the sufferings of right are graven deepest on the chronicle of nations. Rev. H. M. Jackson responded as follows, amidst frequent applause: Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen.—I esteem myself highly honored in being permitted to mingle with you on this festal occasion, to share with you in the reminiscence of events in which I had n
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Annual Reunion of the Virginia division Army of Northern Virginia Association. (search)
test victories of the war. We shall hereafter make copious extracts from it. Nor can we now speak of the splendid banquet, at which admirable speeches were made by Colonel William Allan, of Maryland, Captain John Milledge, of Georgia, Rev. H. Melville Jackson, of Richmond, General Early, Judge Theo. S. Garnett, of Norfolk, Colonel Moore, of North Carolina, and others. We are glad to be able to give in full the Speech of Rev. H. Melville Jackson. Our dead We care not whence they Rev. H. Melville Jackson. Our dead We care not whence they came, Dear in their lifeless clay; Whether unknown or known to fame, Their cause and country still the same- They died-and wore the gray. Father Ryan. Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen of the Army of Northern Virginia,—Having been no soldier, I feel always, on these festive occasions, as if I were an interloper — a sharer in pleasures I have not helped to win—a spectator tolerated of your good courtesy. But to-night, when you assign to me the duty of responding to this sentiment, I meet you on co<