Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for H. R. Jackson or search for H. R. Jackson in all documents.

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rmy. 1. David E. Twiggs, Ga., Brig.-Gen. U. S. A. 2. Leonidas Polk, La., Episcopal Bishop of La. Brigadier-Generals in the Provisional army. 1. P. T. G. Beauregard, Capt. Engs. U. S. A. 2. Braxton Bragg, La., Capt. Art. U. S. A. 3. M. L. Bonham, S. C., Congressman from S. C. 4. John B. Floyd, Va., U. S. Sec. of War. 5. Ben. McCullough, Texas, Maj. Texas Rangers. 6. Wm. H. T. Walker, Ga., Lieut.-Col. Inft. U. S. A. 7. Henry A. Wise, Va., late Gov. of Va. 8. H. R. Jackson, Ga., late Minister to Austria. 9. Barnard E. Bee, S. C., Capt. Inft. U. S. A. 10. Nathan G. Evans, S. C., Major Inft. U. S. A. 11. John B. Magruder,, Va., Major Art. U. S. A. 12. Wm. J. Hardee, Ga., Lieut.-Col. Cav. U. S. A. 13. Benj. Huger, S. C., Major Ordnance U. S. A. 14. Robert S. Garnett, Va., Major Inft. U. S. A. There have been other appointments made, but they are not yet known outside of the War Office. Gens. Fauntleroy, Winder, Cocke, Ruggles, and Holmes ar
killed by a shell, and carried off the ground by the rebel cavalry. There was no loss or damage on our side. The rebel troopers had their camp a little beyond Bunker Hill, and were taken so completely by surprise that they lost their cooking utensils and a dinner just preparing, such as it was — corn bread and bacon. It seems singular that our whole army could move so near to their camp without their being apprised of its advance, when they usually keep up an active scouting and have so many friends in the country. They have no tents, and camp under brushwood; and in one instance, only a few days ago, they robbed a farmer of the crop he had just cut by covering their camps with wheat-sheaves. We noticed a number of their old encampments near the road in coming here, some six or seven thousand men, under Gen. Jackson, having been in this neighborhood until ten days ago, when they retired to Winchester on a false alarm that Patterson was coming. --New York Tribune, July 20.
o it after they refused? The Constitution declares that Congress alone has power to declare war, yet the President has made war. In the last session the Senator from Illinois (Douglas) delivered a speech, on the 15th of March, which he would read. He then read an extract of Mr. Douglas's speech, declaring that the President had no right to make a blockade at New Orleans or Charleston more than at Chicago. He also read from a speech of Daniel Webster, delivered in 1832, declaring that General Jackson had no right to blockade Charleston. He said he approved these sentiments, uttered by these eminent statesmen, who were formerly regarded as sound, and thought the time would again come when it would not be thought treason to maintain them. The resolution proceeds to approve the act of the President enlisting men for three and five years. By what authority of the Constitution and law has he done this? The power is not in the Constitution, nor granted by law. Therefore, it must be ill