Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Henry R. Jackson or search for Henry R. Jackson in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
solated from land approach and nearer the open sea, reinforcements and provisions might be expected and resistance made to the demand of the State for the relinquishment of its territory. On the Georgia coast there were two United States forts, Jackson and Pulaski, near Savannah. One of these, Fort Pulaski, was situated (similarly to Sumter) at the mouth of the Savannah river, on Tybee Roads. It could be supplied with troops and munitions from the sea with little risk, and once properly manndnance-Sergeant Walker with a fort keeper was in charge at the works; only twenty guns were in the fort and the supply of ammunition was meager. Governor Brown, being advised of the situation at Savannah, and of the probability that Pulaski and Jackson would be seized by the people, visited the city, and after consultation with the citizens took the appropriate step of ordering an immediate occupation. The earnest spirit of the citizens of Savannah was manifested on the night of January 1st,
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
and Col. William H. T. Walker as major-general of the second. It was found practicable to organize but one division, of which Walker was appointed major-general, Jackson generously giving up his own promotion and urging Walker for the command. The first call to Georgia made by the government of the Confederate States was for trit in favor of Col. William H. T. Walker, late of the United States army, and a most gallant son of Georgia. I then, in accordance with the recommendation of General Jackson, and the dictates of my own judgment, tendered the appointment to Colonel Walker, by whom it was accepted. The office of brigadier-general was tendered to an be hereafter described, was appointed major-general of State forces by Governor Brown, and assumed command December 28, 1861, with headquarters at Savannah. General Jackson advised General Lee that he held himself subject to the latter's directions in all military operations looking to the defense of the State, and would report a
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
deemed it best to return to Monterey and organize a force to check the apprehended farther advance of the enemy. General Jackson remained in command at this post, organizing the troops collected there; and under Generals Loring and Lee commandedar of the Federal position, and Gen. Samuel R. Anderson, with two regiments, from Loring's command, was to support him. Jackson was to advance from the Greenbrier and Loring from Huntersville. Jackson's advance was preceded by about 100 men from t to their original positions. The fact that Rust's detachment was from Jackson's force led to unjust criticism of General Jackson, which he felt the more keenly because he knew it was unjust. Some time later, Mr. Benjamin, secretary of war, wrotll-earned reputation as a perfect shield against all anonymous attacks. At Camp Bartow, on the Greenbrier river, General Jackson and the six regiments of his division, reduced in effective numbers to 1,800 men, worn by privations and discouraged
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
h of January following, and should be consented to by the troops. The question of transfer was submitted to the troops and decided in the negative almost unanimously. This was previous to the conscript act. When that became a law, Governor Brown immediately tendered the State army to Brigadier-General Lawton, commanding the military district of Georgia, Maj.-Gen. Henry R. Jackson, commander of the State army, having retired in order to prevent any embarrassment. Both the governor and General Jackson in addresses to the troops expressed their appreciation of the high character of this distinctively Georgian organization, and the governor in his message in the following November, spoke in the following terms of the excellent spirit, discipline and patriotism prevailing among this body: They had performed without a murmur, an almost incredible amount of labor in erecting fortifications and field works necessary to the protection of the city, and had made their position so strong a
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
a short combat of about four hours. Toward the close of autumn General Jackson received a telegram from Governor Brown, of Georgia, asking hi act, the division was turned over to the Confederacy, leaving General Jackson without a command. At this time he offered to enlist as a pran war. When Gen. W. H. T. Walker was reappointed to the army, General Jackson became a volunteer aide upon his staff. During the Atlanta campaign Governor Brown employed the services of General Jackson in organizing the State troops that were being assembled for the defense of At of Atlanta, when Hood was preparing for his march into Tennessee, Jackson was reappointed brigadier-general in the Confederate army, and par side of it, and fought until it was surrounded and captured. General Jackson was taken to Johnson's island, thence to Fort Warren, and was ns, a man of affairs, and endowed with exalted home qualities, General Jackson was a type of the best Southern manhood. Brigadier-Genera