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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Howell E. Jackson or search for Howell E. Jackson in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
well, where many brave men, and fair women, paid their respects to the General. The next day we had a charming day at Belle Meade, the splendid estate of General Hardin, where his sons-in-law, General Wm. H. Jackson and United States Senator Howell E. Jackson, and their accomplished ladies, did the honors with unsurpassed grace, and where we could have spent days inspecting the blooded horses, or roaming through the magnificent park, which contains over three hundred deer. General Jackson aGeneral Jackson and General Lee were room-mates and intimate friends at West Point; but entering different regiments of the old army, and serving in different departments of the Confederacy, they had not met since they parted soon after graduation, until this visit of General Lee to Nashville. It was pleasant to witness their cordial greeting, and the enthusiastic renewal of their friendship. That night we were treated to a fine concert and superb banquet, at which there were some fine speeches; but our pri
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
well, where many brave men, and fair women, paid their respects to the General. The next day we had a charming day at Belle Meade, the splendid estate of General Hardin, where his sons-in-law, General Wm. H. Jackson and United States Senator Howell E. Jackson, and their accomplished ladies, did the honors with unsurpassed grace, and where we could have spent days inspecting the blooded horses, or roaming through the magnificent park, which contains over three hundred deer. General Jackson aGeneral Jackson and General Lee were room-mates and intimate friends at West Point; but entering different regiments of the old army, and serving in different departments of the Confederacy, they had not met since they parted soon after graduation, until this visit of General Lee to Nashville. It was pleasant to witness their cordial greeting, and the enthusiastic renewal of their friendship. That night we were treated to a fine concert and superb banquet, at which there were some fine speeches; but our pri