Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Samuel Jackson or search for Samuel Jackson in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ious interests of this country, he died in the city of his adoption on the 14th of May, 1803. His scholarly works and the institution he founded are living monuments to his memory. In his maternal home, and upon the benches whence had gone forth many who had been instructed by his distinguished relative, Mr. DeRenne found opportunity for earnest study. Graduating with honor, and selecting medicine as the profession best suited to his tastes, he became a private pupil of the famous Dr. Samuel Jackson, and entered the Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania. This college was, at that time, probably the most noted in the United States, and the facilities there afforded for mastering the mysteries of the Healing Art were unsurpassed this side the Atlantic. Mr. De-Renne's graduating thesis was entitled a Theory concerning the Nature of Insanity. In was, in 1847, privately printed, to the number of forty-eight copies, for special distribution. Striking in thought and compos
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Dr. G. W. Derenne. (search)
ious interests of this country, he died in the city of his adoption on the 14th of May, 1803. His scholarly works and the institution he founded are living monuments to his memory. In his maternal home, and upon the benches whence had gone forth many who had been instructed by his distinguished relative, Mr. DeRenne found opportunity for earnest study. Graduating with honor, and selecting medicine as the profession best suited to his tastes, he became a private pupil of the famous Dr. Samuel Jackson, and entered the Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania. This college was, at that time, probably the most noted in the United States, and the facilities there afforded for mastering the mysteries of the Healing Art were unsurpassed this side the Atlantic. Mr. De-Renne's graduating thesis was entitled a Theory concerning the Nature of Insanity. In was, in 1847, privately printed, to the number of forty-eight copies, for special distribution. Striking in thought and compos