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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,296 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 888 4 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 676 0 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 642 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 470 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 418 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 404 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 359 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 356 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 350 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Stonewall Jackson or search for Stonewall Jackson in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most famous naval action of the Civil war (search)
carried but three hundred and fifty men, and could not land a force, even if her boats were not shot away, though they would be; that, in fine, I would be willing to take up my quarters in the casemates there and let the Merrimac hammer away for a month — but all to no purpose; the impression had been made on him: a gun mounted on an ironclad must be capable of doing more damage than one on a wooden vessel. An idea once fixed cannot be eradicated; just as we hear people say every day that Jackson at New Orleans defeated the veterans of Waterloo! As to the Merrimac going to New York, she would have foundered as soon as she got outside of Cape Henry. She could not have lived in Hampton Roads in a moderate sea. She was just buoyant enough to float when she had a few days' coal and water on board. A little more would have sent her to the bottom. When she rammed the Cumberland she dipped forward until the water nearly entered her bowport; had it done so she would have gone down. P
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most daring feat — passing the forts at New Orleans (search)
and ten launches. There were two State gunboats: Governor Moore, two guns, Lieutenant Beverly Kennon, and Governor Quitman, two guns, Captain Alexander Grant. Besides these there were six of the so-called River Defense Fleet--the Warrior, Stonewall Jackson, Defence, Resolute, General Lovell, and R. J. Breckinridge--river steamers with bows strengthened for ramming purposes, all but one of which carried a single small smooth-bore gun. They really belonged to the army, and Captain John A. Stephlso on hand. This force, if properly officered and manned, might have been quite formidable, but Commander Mitchell, who took charge only a few days before the battle, had practically only four vessels and twelve guns at his disposal, for the Jackson had gone up the river and the Louisiana was scarcely able to move. The River Defense Fleet proved a failure, for, as General Lovell has said, their total want of system, vigilance, and discipline rendered them useless and helpless. Farragut'