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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,296 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 888 4 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 676 0 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 642 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 470 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 418 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 404 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 359 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 356 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 350 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Stonewall Jackson or search for Stonewall Jackson in all documents.

Your search returned 26 results in 16 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Antietam, battle of. (search)
ossed the Antietam with a part of his corps, commanded by Generals Ricketts, Meade, and Doubleday. Hooker at once attacked the Confederate left, commanded by Stonewall Jackson, who was soon reinforced by General Hood. Sumner was directed to send over Mansfield's corps during the night, and to hold his own in readiness to pass overst side of the creek greatly assisted in driving the Confederates away, with heavy loss,, beyond a line of woods. It was at this time, when Hooker advanced, that Jackson was reinforced. The Confederates swarmed out of the works and fell heavily upon Meade, when Hooker called upon Doubleday for help. A brigade under General Hartsench bore down upon the Confederates more to the left. The Nationals now held position at the Dunker Church, and seemed about to grasp the palm of victory (for Jackson and Hood were falling hack), when fresh Confederate troops, under McLaws and Walker, supported by Early, came up. They penetrated the National line and drove it b
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arbuthnot and Ambrister, case of, (search)
et Arbuthnot, with whom he visited Florida. Here it was alleged they became implicated in Indian difficulties that General Jackson was sent to quell in 1818. By order of General Jackson, Arbuthnot and Ambrister were seized and tried by a militaryGeneral Jackson, Arbuthnot and Ambrister were seized and tried by a military court, convened April 26, 1818, at Fort St. Marks, Fla., Gen. Ed. P. Gaines, president, for inciting the Creek Indian to war against the United States. Ambrister made no defence, but threw himself on the mercy of the court. Arbuthnot was sentencee was commuted to fifty stripes on the bare back, and confinement at hard labor, with ball and chain, for one year. General Jackson disapproved the commutation, and ordered the original sentence in both cases to be carried out, which was done Aprilhe commutation, and ordered the original sentence in both cases to be carried out, which was done April 30, 1818. This arbitrary act of Jackson created great excitement at the time, and the attention of Congress was call to it. See Jackson, Andrew.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Averill, William woods, 1832- (search)
Jones's command. near White Sulphur Springs, where a conflict for Rock Gap occurred, and lasted a greater part of Aug. 26 and 27. Averill was repulsed. and made his way back to Tygart's Valley, having lost 207 men and a Parrott gun, which burst during the fight. The Confederates lost 156 men. Much later in the year Averill made another aggressive movement. He left Beverly early in November with 5,000 men of all arms, and moved southward, driving Confederates under Gen. Mudwall (W. S.) Jackson to a post on the top of Droop Mountain, in Greenbrier county; stormed them (Nov. 6, 1863), and drove them into Monroe county, with a loss of over 300 men, three guns, and 700 small-arms. Averill's loss was about 100 men. West Virginia was now nearly free of armed Confederates, and Averill started, in December, with a strong force of Virginia mounted infantry, Pennsylvania cavalry. and Ewing's battery, to destroy railway communications between the armies of Lee in Virginia and Bragg in
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bank of the United States. (search)
$30.000,000, closed their business, and the loss of the government and of individuals by these banks was estimated at $5,000,000, or one-sixth of their capital. The second United States Bank went into operation in Philadelphia, in 1817, to continue until March, 1836. In it were deposited the funds of the government, the use of which gave the bank great facilities for discounting, and so aiding the commercial community. It soon controlled the monetary affairs of the country; and when General Jackson became President of the United States, in 1829, he expressed his decided hostility to the government bank, as a dangerous institution. He began a war upon it. which ended in its destruction. In his first annual message to Congress (December, 1829), he took strong ground against a renewal of the charter, which would expire in 1836. His reasons were that it had failed in the fulfilment of the promises of its creation — namely, to establish a uniform and sound currency for the whole nat
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Benton, Thomas Hart, -1858 (search)
Benton, Thomas Hart, -1858 Statesman; born near Hillsboro, N. C., March 14, 1782. Before finishing his studies at Chapel Hill University, North Carolina, he removed to Tennessee, studied law, and obtained great eminence in his profession. In the legislature of that State he procured the enactment of a law giving to slaves the benefit of a jury trial, and also succeeded in having a law passed which reformed the judicial system of the State. He had been on intimate terms with General Jackson at Nashville (1813), when a quarrel ensued, and in a personal encounter in that town with deadly weapons both parties gave and received severe wounds. He was colonel of a Tennessee regiment from December, 1812, to April, 1813, and lieutenant-colonel in the regular army from 1813 to 1815. Removing to St. Louis in 1813, he established the Missouri inquirer there, and practised his profession. He took an Thomas Hart Benton. active part in favoring the admission of Missouri as a State of th
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Big Black River, battle at. (search)
oss the stream; so they burned both bridges — cutting off the retreat of their comrades, who were yet fighting. They fled pell-mell towards the defences around Vicksburg. the assailed garrison, about 1,500 strong, was captured, with seventeen guns, several thousand small-arms, and a large quantity of stores. They lost, in killed and wounded, 262 men. General Osterhaus, of the Nationals, was wounded, View on the Big Black River. and the command of his troops devolved upon Brig.-Gen. A. L. Lee. Sharp-shooters in the works on the high banks across the river covered the retreat of the Confederates, and for hours kept the Nationals from constructing floating bridges. Grant's pontoon train was with Sherman, who had been making his way from Jackson to another point (above) on the Big Black River. The Confederates at the bridge fled to Vicksburg. A floating bridge was constructed, and at the same time (May 18, 1863) the three corps crossed the river, and began the siege of Vicksbur
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bird's Point, (search)
Bird's Point, Opposite Cairo, was fortified early in 1861 by the National troops. It was on the west. side of the Mississippi River, a few feet higher than Cairo, so that a battery upon it would completely command that place. The Confederates were anxious to secure this point, and to that end General Pillow, who was collecting Confederate troops in western Tennessee. worked with great energy. When Governor Jackson, of Missouri. raised the standard of revolt at Jefferson City, with Sterling Price as military commander, General Lyon, in command of the department, moved more vigorously in the work already begun in the fortification of Bird's Point. His attention had been called to the importance of the spot by Captain Benham, of the engineers, who constructed the works. They were made so strong that they could defy any force the Confederates might bring against them. With these opposite points so fortified, the Nationals controlled a great portion of the navigation of the Mi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blair, Francis Preston, 1791-1876 (search)
Blair, Francis Preston, 1791-1876 Statesman: born in Abingdon, Va., April 12, 1791 was originally a supporter of Henry Clay, but became an ardent Jackson man in consequence of the agitation over the Bank of the United States (q. c.), and at the suggestion of the President established The globe in Washington, D. C., which was the recognized organ of the Democratic party until 1845, when President Polk displaced him. The Spanish mission was offered to Mr. Blair by the President, but refused. In 1864 his efforts led to the unsatisfactory peace conference of Feb. 3, 1865. He died in Silver Spring, Md., Oct. 18., 1876.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blooming Gap, skirmish at. (search)
Blooming Gap, skirmish at. Gen. F. W. Lander was sent, early in January, 1862, to protect the Baltimore and Ohio Railway. He had a wily and energetic opponent in Stonewall Jackson. who was endeavoring to gain what the Confederates had lost in western Virginia, and to hold possession of the Shenandoah Valley. With about 4,000 men Lander struck Jackson at Blooming Gap (Feb. 14), captured seventeen of his commissioned officers. nearly sixty of his rank and file, and compelled him to retirBlooming Gap, skirmish at. Gen. F. W. Lander was sent, early in January, 1862, to protect the Baltimore and Ohio Railway. He had a wily and energetic opponent in Stonewall Jackson. who was endeavoring to gain what the Confederates had lost in western Virginia, and to hold possession of the Shenandoah Valley. With about 4,000 men Lander struck Jackson at Blooming Gap (Feb. 14), captured seventeen of his commissioned officers. nearly sixty of his rank and file, and compelled him to retire.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Booneville, battle of. (search)
Booneville, battle of. Governor Jackson, of Missouri, a Confederate sympathizer, had abandoned Jefferson City, which was immediately occupied by General Lyon. Before the Confederate forces could concentrate about Booneville, 50) miles above Jefferson City, Lyon moved upon Booneville, and, with 2,000 men, defeated Marmaduke, who offered little resistance, in twenty minutes, on June 17, 1861. This compelled the Confederate detachments to move to the southern border of the State.
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