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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,296 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 888 4 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 676 0 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 642 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 470 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 418 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 404 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 359 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 356 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 350 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Stonewall Jackson or search for Stonewall Jackson in all documents.

Your search returned 27 results in 6 document sections:

Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: Maryland's First patriotic movement in 1861. (search)
ch a crisis. She lacked young leaders. Kentucky was in a worse situation, for her leaders led her into the quagmire of neutrality. Missouri was better off, for Jackson and Price on the one side and Frank Blair on the other were positive men, and promptly ranged the people of the State in arms, for their respective sides. Marylaing secured from Mason an engagement that all troops that would go from Maryland should be promptly received into the army of the Confederate States, and from Colonel Jackson, in command at Harper's Ferry, permission to rendezvous on the Virginia side, opposite Point of Rocks, marched out of Frederick to that place, crossed the PotConfederate States on May 21st and 22d by Lieut.-Col. George Deas, inspector-general on the staff of Gen. Jos. E. Johnston, who in the meantime had superseded Colonel Jackson in command at Harper's Ferry. Captain Johnson, as senior captain, refused to recognize the Virginia authorities. Relying on the promise of Mr. Mason, he insi
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: Maryland's overthrow. (search)
follow her husband. She now volunteered to serve him. She was the only hope of Maryland. Captain Johnson applied to Colonel Jackson for advice in this emergency. Jackson ordered that Mrs. Johnson be furnished with escort and transportation and thaJackson ordered that Mrs. Johnson be furnished with escort and transportation and that she start at once. On May 24, 1861, she left the camp of Companies A and B at the Point of Rocks, escorted by Capt. Wilson Carey Nicholas, Company G, and Second-Lieut. G. M. E. Shearen, Company A, to go to Raleigh via Richmond. At Leesburg they er husband the results of her energy, devotion and enthusiasm. The following receipt from the chief of ordnance of Stonewall Jackson's command has probably no parallel in the history of war: Received, Ordnance Department, Harper's Ferry, Va., an incident of courage, of heroism, of devotion and of enthusiasm thrilled that army through every rank and fiber. Colonel Jackson, then in command at Harper's Ferry, afterwards the world-famous Stonewall, called on her, with his staff, and thanke
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: Marylanders in 1862 under Generals Joseph E. Johnston and Stonewall Jackson. (search)
Chapter 6: Marylanders in 1862 under Generals Joseph E. Johnston and Stonewall Jackson. In November, 1861, Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, then in command of the Confederate army of the Potomac, withdrew from the posts of Mason's and Munson's Hills, established by Beauregard, having information that McClellan was about to sweep them in. Beauregard had established a capital secret service, and his spies in Washington, in the departments and in McClellan's headquarters, kept his headquarters perfectly advised of the intentions of General McClellan. They had reported in time McDowell's projected movement on Bull Run, which resulted in the first battle of Manassas. In November Johnston withdrew from the line of Fairfax Court House to Centreville, in front of Bull Run, and in a month fell back to Bull Run, where he put his troops in camp for the winter. He made his men cover themselves in log huts, which were comfortable, but too warm and illventi-lated for troops in the field. During
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: Maryland artillery—Second Maryland regiment infantryFirst Maryland cavalry. (search)
ght across the open fields against Winder's right and, with the broken brigades and Federals in the rear and the attack in front, they would have been crushed and Jackson ruined. Andrews, without waiting for orders, took his old battery, the First Maryland, across the front of the two brigades in a sweeping gallop, whirled them incapitally handled and evidently damaged the enemy severely. He also calls special attention to the gallantry displayed by Maj. R. S. Andrews in this action. General Jackson said, Special credit is due Major Andrews for the success and gallantry with which his guns were directed, until he was severely wounded and taken from the fi small body in front of them and they charged with cheers, but Dement opened on them with canister at very short range, repulsed them and saved the command. When Jackson moved around Pope's flank and got in his rear at Bristoe Station on the 26th of August, 1862, Ewell's division was left at Bristoe, while Hill and Taliaferro (wh
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: the Maryland Line. (search)
ac R. Trimble. He left Richmond, took horse at Charlottesville, and rode rapidly through the country to Gettysburg, where he arrived on the evening of July 2d. He reported his orders to Trimble, who reported them to Ewell. Ewell had succeeded Jackson in command of the Second corps, and knew Johnson well. He said in his crisp, brusque way, This is no time to be swapping horses. The battle was then raging in his front. The next day, the 3d, Ewell assigned Johnson to the command of his old ven back, until at last the only order of going was sauve qui peut. Out of two hundred and fifty men carried in they left seventy killed, wounded or missing. There was a larger percentage of killed than is usual in battle, for the fighting, as Jackson said about the Bucktail fight, was close and bloody. Some of the finest young men of the Maryland Line lost their lives that day. Alexander Young, private in Company D, son of a former comptroller of the treasury of the United States under Buch
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
mand of a brigade General Elzey was with Stonewall Jackson all through his celebrated Valley campaiision, which he accompanied to the support of Jackson in the Valley campaign of 1862 In this famousat Slaughter's Mountain; and at the time when Jackson lay in the enemy's rear at Bristoe Station, hfew hours, at the age of thirty-three. Gen. Stonewall Jackson said in his report, It is difficult wipicuous merit of this lamented officer by General Jackson, in whose brilliant campaigns in the vallthen readily yielded to the invitation of Generals Jackson and Ewell to accompany them in the operatral Jones resumed command of his brigade, but Jackson was anxious that the young Maryland officer sth whom he was in frequent conference. When Jackson moved toward Harper's Ferry, he was sent to Rolonel of cavalry. The recommendation of General Jackson was for the time not acted upon for the rd for the position in question. A week later Jackson again urged action upon his recommendation. [4 more...]