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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, I. April, 1861 (search)
governor is appointing his Union partisans to military positions. Nevertheless, as time rolls on, and eternal separation is pronounced by the events that must be developed, they may prove true to the best interests of their native land. Every hour there are fresh arrivals of organized companies from the country, tendering their services to the governor; and nearly all the young men in the city are drilling. The cadets of the Military Institute are rendering good service now, and Professor Jackson is truly a benefactor. I hope he will take the field himself; and if he does, I predict for him a successful career. April 24 Martial music is heard everywhere, day and night, and all the trappings and paraphernalia of war's decorations are in great demand. The ladies are sewing everywhere, even in the churches. But the gay uniforms we see to-day will change their hue before the advent of another year. All history shows that fighting is not only the most perilous pursuit in t
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, IV. July, 1861 (search)
involves catering to the caprices of functionaries dressed in a little brief authority, should be spurned with contempt. But Col. Bledsoe is shocked, and renews his threats of resignation. Major Tyler is eager to abandon the pen for the sword; but Congress has not acted on his nomination; and the West Pointers, many of them indebted to his father for their present positions, are inimical to his confirmation. July 5 We have news of a fight at Gainesville between Gen. Patterson and Col. Jackson; the latter, being opposed by overwhelming numbers, fell back after punishing the Philadelphia general so severely that he will not be likely to have any more stomach for fighting during the remainder of the campaign. July 6 Col. Bledsoe complains that the Secretary still has quite as little intercourse with him, personal and official, as possible. The consequence is that the Chief of the Bureau is drawing a fine salary and performing no service. Still, it is not without the swea
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, V. August, 1861 (search)
atues, and made kindling wood of the piano, sofas, etc. August 10 Mr. Benjamin is a frequent visitor at the department, and is very sociable: some intimations have been thrown out that he aspires to become, some day, Secretary of War. Mr. Benjamin, unquestionably, will have great influence with the President, for he has studied his character most carefully. He will be familiar not only with his likes, but especially with his dislikes. It is said the means used by Mr. Blair to hold Gen. Jackson, consisted not so much in a facility of attaching strong men to him as his friends, but in aiming fatal blows at the great. leaders who had incurred the enmity of the President. Thus Calhoun was incessantly pursued. August 11 There is a whisper that something like a rupture has occurred between the President and Gen. Beauregard; and I am amazed to learn that Mr. Benjamin is inimical to Gen. B. I know nothing of the foundation for the report; but it is said that Beauregard was eage
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 10 (search)
y we were on the old footing again. He said Secretary Benjamin had never treated him as Chief of the Bureau, any more than Walker. December 22 Dibble has succeeded in obtaining a passport from the Secretary himself. December 23 Gen. T. J. Jackson has destroyed a principal dam on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. That will give the enemy abundance of trouble. This Gen. Jackson is always doing something to vex the enemy; and I think he is destined to annoy them more. It is with mucGen. Jackson is always doing something to vex the enemy; and I think he is destined to annoy them more. It is with much apprehension that I see something like a general relaxation of preparation to hurl back the invader. It seems as if the government were waiting for England to do it; and after all, the capture of Slidell and Mason may be the very worst thing that could have happened. Mr. Benjamin, I learn, feels very confident that a rupture between the United States and Great Britain is inevitable. War with England is not to be thought of by Mr. Seward at this juncture, and he will not have it. And we shou
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, X. January, 1862 (search)
X. January, 1862 Seward gives up Mason and Slidell. great preparations of the enemy. Gen. Jackson betrayed. Mr. Memminger's blunders. exaggerated reports of our troops in Kentucky and Tennessee. January 1 Seward has cowered beneath the roar of the British Lion, and surrendered Mason and Slidell, who have beenhing afloat to oppose to them. And there is no entente cordiale between Mr. Benjamin and any of our best generals. January 4 It is just as I feared. Gen. T. J. Jackson, supposing his project to be a profound secret, marched on the 1st instant from Winchester, intending to surprise a force of the enemy at Romney. But he hamen sympathizing with the Union cause were daily leaving Richmond for Baltimore was known to all, but how they gained intelligence of the contemplated movement of Jackson is the mystery. January 6 No news. January 7 Brig-Gen. Wise is to command on Roanoke Island. It is not far from Princess Ann County, where his place
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XIX. October, 1862 (search)
depots can decide what soldiers are entitled to pass on the roads. October 17 The article in the Whig is backed by one of a similar character in the Examiner. We shall see what effect they will have on the policy adopted by the Secretary of War. Although still unofficial, we have confirmatory accounts of Bragg's victory in Kentucky. The enemy lost, they say, 25,000 men. Western accounts are generally exaggerated. The President has appointed the following lieutenant-generals: Jackson, Longstreet, (Bishop) Polk, Hardee, Pemberton, Holmes, and Smith (Kirby). The raid of Stuart into Pennsylvania was a most brilliant affair. He captured and destroyed much public propertyre-specting that of individuals. The Abolitionists are much mortified, and were greatly frightened. The plan of this expedition was received at the department to-day-just as conceived and prepared by Lee, and it was executed by Stuart in a masterly manner. Advices from Winchester inform the govern
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XX. November, 1862 (search)
ave in letters from Gen. Lee, dated 7th inst., near Culpepper C. H. He says the enemy's cavalry is very numerous, while our horses have the sore tongue, and tender hoofs. Lee has ordered the stores, etc. from Gordonsville to Lynchburg. He says Jackson may possibly march through one of the gaps and fall upon the enemy's flank, and intimates that an opportunity may be offered to strike the invaders a blow. Yesterday, Sunday, a cavalry company dashed into Fredericksburg, and after robbing theny women, children, and negroes from Fredericksburg and its vicinity. The benevolent and patriotic citizens here had, I believe, made some provision for their accommodation. But the enemy had not yet shelled the town. There is a rumor that Jackson was to appear somewhere in the rear of the enemy, and that the Federal stores which could not be moved with the army had been burnt at Manassas. Yesterday the President remitted the sentence of a poor lad, sentenced to ball-and-chain for six
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 22 (search)
of having gained nothing! My friend, Dr. Powell, near the city, abandoned his farm last summer, when it was partly in possession of the enemy, leaving fifty negroes on it — which he could have sold for $50,000. They promised not to leave him, and they kept their word. Judge Donnell, in North Carolina, has left his plantation with several hundred thousand dollars worth on it-rather risking their loss than to sell them. December 4 All is quiet (before the storm) on the Rappahannock, Gen. Jackson's corps being some twenty miles lower down the river than Longstreet's. It is said Burnside has been removed already and Hooker given the command. Gen. S. Cooper takes sides with Col. Myers against Gen. Wise. Gen. W.'s letter of complaint of the words, Let them suffer, was referred to Gen. C., who insisted upon sending the letter to the Quartermaster-General before either the Secretary or the President saw it,--and it was done. Why do the Northern men here hate Wise? Gen. Lee dis
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXV. April, 1863 (search)
er now, and vegetation shows signs of the return of the vernal season. We shall soon have blossoms and roses in abundance, and table vegetables too, to dispel the fears of famine. But we shall also have the horrid sounds of devastating war; and many a cheerful dame and damsel to-day, must soon put on the weeds of mourning. Gen. Jos. E. Johnston has assumed the command of the army of Tennessee. Gen. Howell Cobb is preparing for the defense of Florida. We do not hear a word from Lee or Jackson — but this is the ominous silence preceding their decisive action. Bacon fell to-day from $2 to $1.50 per pound, and butter from $3.50 to $3.25; potatoes are $16 per bushel. And yet they say there is no scarcity in the country. Such supplies are hoarded and hidden to extort high prices from the destitute. An intelligent gentleman from North Carolina told me, to-day, that food was never more abundant in his State; nevertheless, the extortioners are demanding there very high prices.
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 27 (search)
e's thanks to the army. crowds of prisoners coming in. Lieut. Gen. Jackson dead. Hooker's raiders hooked a great many horses. enemy deman Gen. Lee: Milford, May 3d, 1863. President Davis. Yesterday Gen. Jackson, with three of his divisions, penetrated to the rear of the enemeat victory. I regret to state that Gen. Paxton was killed. Gen. Jackson severely, and Generals Heth and A. P. Hill slightly, wounded. the Commanding General announces to the army the death of Lieut.-Gen. T. J. Jackson, who expired on the 10th inst., at 3-P. M. The daring, sky. R. E. Lee, General. The letter written by Gen. Lee to Gen. Jackson before the death of the latter is as follows: The letter of Gen. Lee to Gen. Jackson.Chancellorville, May 4th. General:-- I have just received your note informing me that you were wounded. I cannot eo your skill and energy. Most truly yours, R. E. Lee. To Gen. T. J. Jackson. The nation's agony, as it is termed in a Washington pape
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