Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for T. J. Jackson or search for T. J. Jackson in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Graduates of the United States Military Academy at West Point, N. Y., [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, March 30, April 6, 27, and May 12, 1902.] (search)
on's Division, Ewell's Corps, Army of Northern Virginia. Killed May 10, 1864, at Spotsylvania, Virginia. Edward Murray. 1099. Born Maryland. Appointed Maryland. 41. Lieutenant-Colonel, Forty-ninth Virginia Infantry, Early's Division, Jackson's Corps, Army of Northern Virginia. Abraham Buford. 1109. Born Kentucky. Appointed Kentucky. 51. Brigadier-General, September 2, 1862. Commanding Second Division of Cavalry, N. B. Forrest's Cavalry Corps, Army of Tennessee. 1842rolina. Appointed at Large. 33. Brigadier-General, June 17, 1861. Commanded Third Brigade, Army of Shenandoah. Killed July 21, 1861, at Bull Run, Va. (He was the man who gave T. J. Jackson his sobriquet of Stonewall. Look, men; there is Jackson standing like a stonewall!) 1846. John A. Brown. 1287. Born Maryland. Appointed Maryland. 16. Lieutenant-Colonel, Confederate States Army. Chief of ordnance and artillery, staff of General E. Kirby Smith, Army Kentucky and Trans-Missi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.23 (search)
s, within range of which I was moving. I reported to General Early after midnight, and found the whole army in retreat. I was directed to close up the rear with Jackson's Cavalry Brigade behind me. We reached Rockville during the day, where Jackson was pushed by the Second Massachusetts Cavalry, who hung on to his rear, and rendeJackson was pushed by the Second Massachusetts Cavalry, who hung on to his rear, and rendered things very uncomfortable generally. Finding matters getting disagreeable, I put in a squadron of the First Maryland, under Captain Wilson G. Nicholas, and Lieutenant Thomas Green, and charged into the town, scattering our pursuers, who got out of the way with expedition. Their dismounted men, however, stuck to the houses a divisions of Gordon, Rodes, Breckinridge and Ramseur, of about 8,500 muskets, the Cavalry Division of Major-General Robert Ransom, consisting of the brigades of Jackson, Johnson, McCausland and Imboden, about 2,000 badly armed, worse equipped, and undisciplined mounted men, and three battalions of artillery of about forty guns an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
and by Medical Director Hunter McGuire of General Jackson's army to Brigade Surgeon J. Burd Peale aion is made of the circumstance that when General Jackson defeated General Banks and entered Wincheed above continued till the retirement of General Jackson on the 31st of May. On that day the Prov862, after the defeat of General Banks by General Jackson at Winchester, I found among the capturedrector of the Army I reported the fact to General Jackson and asked his permission to unconditionalxchanged. No regular order was issued by General Jackson to perform the duty I have reported, but g my term of service as Medical Director with Jackson, Ewell, Early and Gordon, with whom I successout this time it was well understood that General Jackson regarded the medical officers of the oppocers was first suggested and practiced by General Jackson, and if it had been carried out in good fand wounded in war. I think the action of General Jackson will be a crowning honor to the treatment[3 more...]