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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 101 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 88 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 77 5 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 68 6 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 25 5 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 22 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 17 3 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 15 1 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 14 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence. You can also browse the collection for Thomas Jonathan Jackson or search for Thomas Jonathan Jackson in all documents.

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of Mechanicsville, five miles north-east of Richmond, General Jackson had been ordered with his army from the valley of the ive Lee the opportunity for a general attack. General Thomas Jonathan Jackson, known alike to friends and foes as Stonewall,e saddle. General Stuart had received directions from General Jackson to cover his left flank, so we marched with great cautngthened by natural as well as artificial fortifications. Jackson had with him in all, including his reinforcements, about 4ptly demanded who was there, a mild voice answered me, General Jackson. The great Confederate leader was in search of Generatuart, who slept on my right, was immediately aroused; and Jackson, accepting my invitation so to do, sat down on my blanketrecent battle, and expressed his great admiration for Lee, Jackson, and Stuart. About 10 A. M. I was able to turn the prie first two days of the contest been completely whipped by Jackson on the right, and that portion of his army north of the Ch