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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 101 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 88 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 77 5 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 68 6 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 25 5 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 22 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 17 3 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 15 1 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 14 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Thomas Jonathan Jackson or search for Thomas Jonathan Jackson in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 7 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
the part of General Lee's staff to say anything that might seem to detract from the fame of General Jackson. The first public allusion to the fact that the famous stroke of generalship, which won the Battle of Chancellorsville, was directed by Lee and executed by Jackson, seems to have been made by Major John W. Daniel, in his address at the Fifth Annual Re-union of the Army of Northern Virginia, in October 1875, nine years after the publication of the Life and Campaigns of Lieutenant-General Thomas J. Jackson, in which Dr. R. L. Dabney stated that at a conference between Lee and Jackson on the night of May 1st, 1863, General Jackson proposed to throw his command entirely into Hooker's rear. But it was not until the Ninth Annual Re-union of the Association, in October, 1879, that General Fitzhugh Lee, in his address on Chancellorsville, endeavored to settle the question as to who originated the movement of Jackson's corps to the rear of Hooker, and gave Col. Charles Marshall's acco
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), An address before the ladies' memorial Association. (search)
An address before the ladies' memorial Association. With Glowing apostrophe to General T. J. Jackson, at Charlotte, N. C., May 10th, 1906. By Hon. R. T. Bennett, Late Col. of the 14th N. C. Regiment, C. S. A. [As to other addresses of Col. Bennett and notice of his admirable career, see Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. XXXIII, p. 65.—Ed.] Madame President, Ladies of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Citizens: When that illustrious man William Edward Gladstone lay in the crisis of his fate, which closed in his death May 18th, 1898, messages of sympathy from the foremost men of our Christian world were read to him, and he murmured at intervals, Kindness, kindness, kindness! at length as prayers were ended he exclaimed, Amen! There is sunshine in my soul to-day. You have given me manifestations of sympathy akin to affection. An old man taken in the act of doing right is your guest to-day. I value beyond weights and measures the good opinion of ou
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Some war history never published. (search)
r possession for a partial campaign, difficulties arose like the lion in the path of the sluggard, so that the proposition was postponed and never executed. In like manner the expedition into Westtern Virginia was projected and achieved by Gen. T. J. Jackson, who was not of this council. We are not informed who it was that felt that stern desire and purpose dread to go forth at the risk of almost certain destruction, but from the foregoing and other indications, including the decision of tho Eastern Maryland, and, by a rapid movement, to perform a valuable service in that region; another example of daring and desire to use the power then available was the request, sent through Gen. W. N. Pendleton, of the artillery, by Brigadier-General T. J. Jackson, that his brigade should be detached and permitted to cross the Potomac and attack the enemy at his capital. To return to the paper now under review: In one place it is written that the President stated at that time no reinforcem
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
k to General Jackson also. All this occupied some time, and it was now sunrise, and the man I sent with the first prisoner (Mr. John T. Smith, of Lynchburg), returned with orders from General Jackson for the officer in charge of the picket to report to him at once. First glimpse of Jackson. I had never seen General Jackson, though we had come down the Valley with him. I at once turned my picket over to the next in command and hurried to my first sight of the general commanding, T. J. Jackson. I had not very far to go, as Jackson always kept well up to the front. I found the different commands all awake, having been aroused by my first courier sent back. John T. Smith, with the prisoner, had no difficulty in finding the general's headquarters under a tree on top of a high hill. I rode up, saluted, and asked is this General Jackson. On receiving an affirmative reply, I told him I was the officer in charge of the picket at Halltown; had received order from him to report a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.33 (search)
ing of 1862, at which time he became a member of Stonewall Jackson's staff, a position that he retained up to the spring of 1863. William L. Jackson was born and reared in Lewis county, Va., (now West Virginia), and was a first cousin of Thomas Jonathan Jackson, better known as Stonewall. He was a lawyer by profession, and in the year 1859 was elected circuit judge of the Twenty-first Judicial District of Virginia, that was composed of the counties of Taylor, Preston, Upshur, Harrison, Barbour, Tucker, Randolph and Marion, and was known at the beginning of the war of 1861 as Judge Jackson, and at this time was the most widely known, as well as the most popular man in all that part of Virginia. Before beginning the story of the Imboden Raid, in order to have a proper understanding of the whole affair, it is necessary to give an epitomized history of military events that had preceded the year of 1863. A great part of the hard fighting of the Civil War was done in the campaign of 1
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), List of Virginia chaplains, Army of Northern Virginia. (search)
ohn H. Bocock, F. McCarthy and Rev. Mr. Frayser; Eleventh Regiment, John C. Granberry and Thomas C. Jennings. Corse's Brigade—Fifteenth Regiment, P. F. August; Seventeenth Regiment, John L. Johnson and R. M. Baker; Thirtieth Regiment, W. R. D. Moncure; Thirty-second Regiment; Thirty-ninth Regiment, Rev. Mr. Phillippi. Missionary chaplains in the corps—Rev. Dr. Theoderick Pryor, Rev. Dr. J. C. Granberry, Rev. Harvie Hatcher, Rev. Dr. A. B. Woodfin. Second Army Corps. Lieutenant-Generals T. J. Jackson, R. S. Ewell, J. A. Early and Major-General John B. Gordon. Missionary chaplains at large—Rev. Dr. B. T. Lacy, Rev. Dr. L. Rosser and Rev. E. J. Willis. Gordon's Division: Chaplains of William Terry's Brigade (composed of remnants of Stonewall, J. M. Jones's and Stuart's Virginia Brigades)—Sixty—first Georgia Regiment, A. B. Woodfin, of Virginia; Second Regiment, A. C. Hopkins; Fifth Regiment, E. Payson Walton and C. S. M. Lee Fourth Regiment, F. C. Tebbs and Willia
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
nel, 20 Henley, Captain R. L, Gallantry of, 251. Herndon, Dr., Brodie Strauchan, 42. Hill, Tribute to General Lee, by B. H. 351. Hoffman, Com. Gen. of Prisoners, Col., 40. Holmes, Colonel, Oliver Wendell, 273. Hooker, general, Joseph, 1, 206, 209. Horner, Mrs., Kate Arnold, 29. Hotchkiss, Major, Jed., 2. Howitzers, Richmond, 29, 364. Hunter, Major Robert W., 254, 359. Hunton, General, Eppa, 261. Imboden, General J. D., 293. Imboden Raid and its effects, 295. Jackson, General T. J., 1; Glowing apostrophe to, 55; at Harper's Ferry in 1861, 202. Jackson, General W. L., Mudwall, 213, 294, 301. Jenifer, Lieutenant-Colonel, 259. Johnson's Island Prison, 39; Rations at, 43; Religious services at, 46; Lines Exchanged on, 47. Johnson, General, Bradley Tyler, 176. Johnston, General J. E. 133; Surrender and disbanding of forces of, 124. Jones, Lieutenant, Ap Catesby, criticized, 328. Jones, Captain J. B., 83. Jones, Maryus, 275. Jones, General W. E..