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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Thomas K. Jackson or search for Thomas K. Jackson in all documents.

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entucky, September 26, 1861. The following officers are announced as the personal and departmental staff of General Albert S. Johnston, commanding, viz.: personal staff.-Aide-de-Camp: R. P. Hunt, lieutenant C. S. Army. Volunteer Aides: Colonels Robert W. Johnson, Thomas C. Reynolds, Samuel Tate; Majors George T. Howard, D. M. Haydon, and Edward W. Munford. Department of Orders.-Assistant Adjutant-Generals: Lieutenant-Colonel W. W. Mackall, Captain H. P. Brewster, First-Lieutenant N. Wickliffe (acting). Quartermaster's Department.-Principal Quartermaster: Major Albert J. Smith. Commissary Department.-Principal Commissary: Captain Thomas K. Jackson. Engineer's Corps.-First-Lieutenant Joseph Dixon. By command of General A. S. Johnston. W. W. Mackall, Assistant Adjutant-General. The appointments of volunteer aides were made chiefly to secure intelligent advice on the political affairs of the department, each State of which was represented on the staff.
supports of the Confederate cause in the West. Whoever was at the head, it was upon Polk and Hardee, the corps commanders, as upon two massive pillars, that the weight of organization and discipline rested. General Polk was made a lieutenant-general, October 10, 1862, and was killed by a shell aimed at him, June 14, 1864, near Marietta, Georgia, while boldly reconnoitring the enemy's position. Hon. Thomas C. Reynolds, the constitutional Lieutenant-Governor of Missouri, and, after Governor Jackson's death, its legal Governor, has given the writer his recollections of General Johnston at Columbus. Himself a gentleman of fine talents and culture, Governor Reynolds's opinions and impressions cannot fail to receive consideration: My recollections of your illustrious father are of little or no historical interest. Soon after he arrived at Columbus, Kentucky, he did me the honor of inviting me to come upon his staff as honorary aide-de-camp, with the rank of colonel; at the same
he same extent still. I beg your influence with the volunteers to induce them to bring into the field every effective arm in their possession. Rifles and shot-guns-double-barreled guns in particular-can be made effective weapons in the hands of your skilled horsemen. These arms will be replaced in the hands of the troops by uniform arms at the shortest practicable period. I have selected the following points in your States for the rendezvous of this force, viz.: Knoxville, Nashville, Jackson, Trenton, and Memphis. At each of these places officers will be in readiness to muster in companies, battalions, and regiments, as soon as organized, for the war, or for twelve months, as they decide to serve. At these designated places provision will be made for supplies, and the instruction of the troops will be prosecuted until they can be armed and prepared to move to the frontier. The proportion of troops to be ordered to these different points, depending upon the districts from