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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Kelleysville, March 17th, 1863-Reports of Generals J. E. B. Stuart and Fitz. Lee. (search)
supplied with horses, saddles, and bridles. Commanding officers of the detachments from the various regiments engaged mention in their reports as deserving especial attention: In the Fifth, Private Wm. J. Haynes,,Company F. (badly wounded); Private A. R. Harwood, Company E., Private Henry Wooding, Company C., (especially commended, seized the colors when the horse of the color-bearer was shot, and carried them bravely through the fight); Sergeants Morecocke and Ratliffe, and Private George James, Company H. In the Fourth, Captains Newton and Old, Lieutenant Hobson and Adjutant Fontaine (seriously wounded). Sergeant Kimbrough, of Company G, deserves particular notice; wounded early in the day, he refused to leave the field. In the last charge he was the first to spring to the ground to open the fence. Then, dashing on at the head of the column, he was twice sabred over the head, his arm shattered by a bullet, captured and carried over the river, when he escaped and walke
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General Kershaw. (search)
ond battery mentioned above, and which most annoyed us, leaving Barksdale to deal with that at the orchard. Meanwhile, to aid this attack, I changed the direction of the Seventh regiment, Colonel Aiken, and the Third, Major Maffett, to the left, so as to occupy the rocky hill and wood, and opened fire on the battery. Barksdale had not yet appeared, but came up soon after and cleared the orchard with the assistance of the fire of my Eighth South Carolina, Colonel Henegan, on my left, and James' battalion, Lieutenant-Colonel Rice, the next in order of battle. This brigade then moved so far to the left as no longer to afford me any assistance. In a few minutes after my line halted the enemy advanced across the wheat field in two lines of battle, with a very small interval between the lines, in such a manner as to take the Seventh South Carolina in flank. I changed the direction of the right wing of the regiment, under Lieutenant-Colonel Bland, to meet the attack, and hurried back
acting master E. P. Meeker, of New-Jersey, acting master's mate Hammond, and Lieuts. Tilson and Hughes of the coast guard, the guns were placed in position at a curve of the road, from which they commanded the enemy's battery. They opened fire, and kept it up briskly until their ammunition gave out. The battery suffered severely in the fight, and at one time was too short-handed to be worked effectively. At this period the brave and patriotic chaplain of the Twenty-fifth Massachusetts, Rev. Mr. James, disregarding the dangers by which those at the guns were surrounded, helped to work the guns himself until their ammunition was exhausted. An advanced position was taken by the Twenty-fifth Massachusetts and maintained under a terrible fire from the enemy's battery, until the forty rounds of ball-cartridge distributed to the men were exhausted, when they were relieved by the Tenth Connecticut. The Connecticut men maintained this position with the fortitude of veteran troops. The
ed. Lieut.-Col Clough, of Texas; Lieut.-Col. Robb, of Clarksville Capt. May, of Memphis; Capt. Porter of Nashville. Fourteenth Mississippi regiment. Judge Rogers, Monroe County, Mississippi; Sergeant John Clark, R. M. Bell, J. Q. Wall, George James. wounded. Major Hewitt, Second Kentucky regiment, (since reported dead;) Capt. Many, of Nashville; Capt. Crigier, Fourteenth Mississippi; Capt. Gholson, Fourteenth Mississippi; Lieut. Duquecron, Fourteenth Mississippi. Company C, to ut.-Col. Clough, Texas; Lieut.-Col. Robb, Clarksville, Tenn.; Capt. May, Memphis; Capt. Porter, Nashville. Fourteenth Mississippi Regiment.--Judge Rogers, Monroe Co., Miss.; Sergt. Jno. Clark, Sergt. John Montgomery, R. M. Bell, J. G. Watt, George James. Wounded.--Major Hewitt, Second Kentucky regiment, (since reported dead;) Capt. Many, Nashville; Capt. Crigier, Fourteenth Mississippi; Capt. Gholson, Fourteenth Mississippi; Lieut. Duquecron, Fourteenth Mississippi. In company C, of the
f the Signal Corps, who were used as aids. And I most cordially bear my testimony to the conduct of the above-mentioned officers as a most worthy and gallant set of gentlemen. They were indefatigable in carrying orders, urging on men, and in placing the regiments, coolly and correctly obeying every order, and always under the heaviest fire. Without drawing any distinctions in the staff, I would take advantage of this opportunity to mention the names of Lieutenants James M. Pendleton and James H. and Edward N. Strong, as being volunteers who, without commission or emolument, have acted during the entire campaign as aids, and performed every duty zealously and satisfactorily, and whose conduct during the day I have already spoken of, and to suggest that, under these circumstances, their services deserve a recognition if not award from the Government. I also desire to return my thanks to the colonels for the able assistance they rendered, in promptly and correctly obeying, with t
ds distance, with guns of my own selection. 3. No better piece for breaching can be desired than the forty-two pounder James. The grooves, however, must be kept clean. Parrott guns, throwing as much metal as the James, would be equally good, doing much harm. The guns used by the men of the Wabash were three thirty-pounder Parrotts, and one twenty-four-pounder James. I am, very respectfully, C. R. P. Rodgers, Commander. Terms of capitulation. Fort Pulaski, Ga., April 11, e one thousand six hundred and twenty yards distant from the centre of Pulaski. The former mounted one twenty-four-pound James, and five twenty-pound Parrott guns; the latter two twelve pound James, and two thirty-two-pound James Last of all was baJames, and two thirty-two-pound James Last of all was battery Totten, under Capt. Rod man, where were placed the four ten-inch mortars. All of these nearest batteries were very close together, and, as they were to be so much exposed, connected by trenches or covered ways. The splinter-proofs now were i
heavy thirteen-inch mortars, four ten-inch mortars, six ten-inch columbiads, four eight-inch columbiads, five thirty-pounder Parrotts, two forty-two-pounder rifled James, two thirty-two-pounder rifled James, and one twenty-four-pounder James! The three batteries which fought Macon — for the gunboats and barges cannot fairly be takJames, and one twenty-four-pounder James! The three batteries which fought Macon — for the gunboats and barges cannot fairly be taken into the account-mounted eleven pieces, all told; and yet the most brilliant success was achieved in one third the time, and at the expense of only one man killed and two wounded! There were found in the Fort twenty thousand pounds of powder, with shot and shell in proportion; a large supply of provisions, and abundance of waJames! The three batteries which fought Macon — for the gunboats and barges cannot fairly be taken into the account-mounted eleven pieces, all told; and yet the most brilliant success was achieved in one third the time, and at the expense of only one man killed and two wounded! There were found in the Fort twenty thousand pounds of powder, with shot and shell in proportion; a large supply of provisions, and abundance of water. The garrison is estimated by the Adjutant at four hundred and forty men, exclusive of officers; but at the time when I questioned him he did not have the company reports in his possession, and could not give the exact figures. Two companies were armed with Mississippi rifles, the range and accuracy of which are superior; the<
e brigade resupplied with horses, saddles, and bridles. Commanding officers of the detachments from the various regiments engaged mention, in their reports, as deserving special attention: In the Fifth, private Wm. J. Haynes, company F, badly wounded; private A. R. Harwood, company E; private Henry Wooding, company C, especially commended, seized the colors when the horse of the color-bearer was shot, and carried them bravely through the fight; Sergeants Morecock and Ratcliffe, and private George James, company H. In the Fourth, Captains Newton and Old, Lieutenant Hobson and Adjutant Fontaine, seriously wounded. Sergeant Kimborough, of company G, deserves particular notice: wounded early in the day, he refused to leave the field. In the last charge, he was the first to spring to the ground to open the fence; then dashing on at the head of the column, he was twice sabred over the head, his arm shattered by a bullet, captured and carried over the river, when he escaped and walked b
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 55: Fessenden's death.—the public debt.—reduction of postage.— Mrs. Lincoln's pension.—end of reconstruction.—race discriminations in naturalization.—the Chinese.—the senator's record.—the Cuban Civil War.—annexation of San Domingo.—the treaties.—their use of the navy.—interview with the presedent.—opposition to the annexation; its defeat.—Mr. Fish.—removal of Motley.—lecture on Franco-Prussian War.—1869-1870. (search)
e the impression of his quick word. Nor up to this time had Mr. Fish done aught inconsistent with his friendship for the senator. His weak compliance with a scheme to which, unless he is misjudged, he was opposed stands to his discredit as a public man; but it does not up to this time impeach his honor and fidelity as a friend. As usual in the summer Sumner passed some days with Longfellow at Nahant; Sumner lying all the morning in a hammock reading Lothair. Dine with him and T. at George James's. (Longfellow's Journal, August 1.) Longfellow's letter of July 18 welcomed him to the sea-shore, and said of Motley's removal, It is a gross insult to him, and a very disreputable act to all concerned in it. and he made a brief visit to a friend in Beverly. In September he was Mr. Hooper's guest at Cotuit. He had promised a visit to the poet Bryant at Cummington, but the burden of a lecture on his mind compelled him to forego it. He was glad to greet Bemis, fresh from foreign journey
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
served in the Confederate army. The sons' names are as follows: Joseph N. Jr., James H., Benjamin F., William H., and Elias Eugene. Joseph N. Jr., the eldest, servle of Brandy Station and rendered unfit for further service. He died in 1882. James H. entered the war in 1861 as captain of Company B (afterward Company A), Palme and it is worthy of mention that his father and three of his brothers, Joseph, James and William, were graduates of the same institution. Upon completing his collein 1879 to Miss Sarah M. Roach, of Sumter, and they have five sons: Richard K., James G. R., Arthur H., R Eugene and Julien Diggs. Mr. Wilder is a member of Camp Dibrother-in-law. During the early part of the war this company was a part of George James' battalion, and was for several months on duty in the vicinity of Charleston of Southport, N. C., and they have had three children, two of whom are living, James C., a practicing physician at Whitesville, N. C., having been educated at the u
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