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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 9 1 Browse Search
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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 56: San Domingo again.—the senator's first speech.—return of the angina pectoris.—Fish's insult in the Motley Papers.— the senator's removal from the foreign relations committee.—pretexts for the remioval.—second speech against the San Domingo scheme.—the treaty of Washington.—Sumner and Wilson against Butler for governor.—1870-1871. (search)
Proprietor and editor of the Philadelphia Item. He died in 1891 at the age of seventy-one. and in New York, where he dined with Lieber. As soon as he reached Boston he went to Nahant, where he divided his time between Longfellow and Mr. George Abbot James. One day in August, in company with Longfellow and son, Agassiz, James, and a young Japanese prince, he went by invitation of Judge Russell, collector of the port, on a revenue cutter to Minot's Ledge, where they were hoisted up in a chaiJames, and a young Japanese prince, he went by invitation of Judge Russell, collector of the port, on a revenue cutter to Minot's Ledge, where they were hoisted up in a chair into the light-house. Longfellow's Life, vol. III. p. 170. The poet saw in his friend traces of the attack of angina pectoris in the winter, and wrote to G. W. Greene: He complains that I walk too fast, and is averse to walking at all. Sumner made a brief visit to Mr. Hooper at Cotuit, and was for a day with B. P. Poore at Newbury. On September 23 he assisted at the Bird Club in commemorating the Whig State convention of 1846, in which he was a leader of the Conscience Whigs at the open
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 58: the battle-flag resolution.—the censure by the Massachusetts Legislature.—the return of the angina pectoris. —absence from the senate.—proofs of popular favor.— last meetings with friends and constituents.—the Virginius case.—European friends recalled.—1872-1873. (search)
se of health, and a certain elasticity. During August and till late in September he was at his rooms in the Coolidge House, or at Nahant with Longfellow or George Abbot James. In Mrs. James, daughter of John E. Lodge, he took an almost paternal interest. A room in the house was called the Senator's when it was built in 1868: Mrs. James, daughter of John E. Lodge, he took an almost paternal interest. A room in the house was called the Senator's when it was built in 1868: and from that time he was usually a guest in the summer. Mr. James wrote in January, 1890: It made and still makes our summer a different thing,—missing him! We loved him dearly, and he knew it. His relations with my wife were almost paternal. He was the greatest man I have ever known, and one of the most lovable, with all his Mr. James wrote in January, 1890: It made and still makes our summer a different thing,—missing him! We loved him dearly, and he knew it. His relations with my wife were almost paternal. He was the greatest man I have ever known, and one of the most lovable, with all his peculiarities. While at the sea-shore he received a call from Mr. Wilson, their first meeting since the latter's stroke of paralysis. He made calls in the city on the few friends to be found there during the warm season,—one of them on Henry L. Pierce, the mayor. Early in September, in company with Longfellow, he took a drive of <