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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 20 2 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 1 1 Browse Search
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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 7: the World's Convention.—1840. (search)
ejudices and customs of society in putting down slavery. Great confusion followed this home-thrust, whereupon the Rev. Alexander Harvey, of Glasgow, rose and professed great respect for women—within their sphere. He thought, and conscientiously believed, that if he gave his vote for admitting females to vote and speak in such an assembly as the present, he should be acting in opposition to what he considered the word of God. Cheers and more confusion ensued. Another clergyman, the Rev. John Angell James, of Birmingham, thought the question prejudicial to the cause. It was new in England and unsettled in America, and involved far wider considerations than slavery. Imitating the facetiousness of the Rev. Mr. Burnet, he said that if the women yielded this point, it would be one more laurel in their Martyr Age. James G. Birney deprecated the impression that had been conveyed by George Thompson and some of the American speakers, that the question was settled in the United States.
, 2.436, G. W. Benson, 2.346, 359. James, John Angell, Rev., 2.372. Jay, John [1745-1829], 1.89.1.32, son Lloyd, 1.33, 37, 38, 44, 48, 51, son James, 1.35, daughter Elizabeth, 1.39, E. W. Allen, McCloskey, John, Rev., 1.514. McCrummell, James [b. Virginia], delegate to Nat. A. S. ConventiPortrait in A Sylvan City, p. 354. Madison, James [1751-1836], maintains slave representation inent, 171. Mitchell, Stephen, 1.68. Monroe, James [1758-1831], pro-slavery action, 1.154, fathern-law of S. L. Gouverneur, 493. Montgomery, James [1771-1854], 2.395. Monthly Offering, 2.284ph B., fellow-apprentice of G., 1.40. Mott, James [b. Cowneck, Long Island, June 29, 1788; d. Brial Hist. Boston, vol. 3. Nephew of Otis, James [1725-1783], 1.498, 2.89. Otis, Lucinda, 2.217. Parrott, Elizabeth E., 1.330. Parton, James [b. 1822], 1.275. Pastoral Letter, 2.133-13ention, 2.421, at Chardon St., 424. Ripley, James W. [d. 1835], 1.111. Robeson, Andrew, at Ch
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Harriet Beecher Stowe. (search)
ed in her honor. She had given the world a most charming and wonderful work of fiction. She had shot, with her own tender hand, the arrow that had pierced the joints of the armor wherewith the system of slavery was clad, and had given the monstrous evil a mortal wound. She had furnished, in her Uncle Tom, one of the most beautiful embodiments of the Christian religion that was ever presented to the world. And if these last words, which were uttered by no other than the well-known Rev. John Angell James, seem extravagant praise, we have only to remind the reader that the celebrated critic, Heinrich Heine, whom no one can suspect of partiality in such a matter, after describing his gropings and flounderings amid the uncertain and unsatisfactory speculations of German philosophy, tells us how at length he came to quit Hegel, and to quote the Bible with Uncle Tom,--came, too, to see that there was a higher wisdom in the poor slave's simple faith than in the great philosopher's dialecti