Your search returned 44 results in 20 document sections:

1 2
ned by the piece until his right leg was shattered by a musket ball, and then, unassisted, retired. Lieutenant Bramhall speaks of both the sergeant and all the men, with the exception of one, who retired after the third fire, as exhibiting the greatest bravery. He was also particular to speak of the bravery shown by M. Carmichael and W. F. Matteson. His report to Captain Bunting is full of the praises of the whole detachment. The loss sustained by the battery is as follows, viz.: One James's rifled cannon, bronze, one gun carriage, one gun limber, seven horses with equipments, four men missing, six men wounded. The following is a list of those who were in the detachment which crossed the river: Sergeant S. G. Tucker, right leg shattered; Corporal W. F. Tanner, missing, probably drowned; Corporal L. C. Olney, missing, probably drowned; privates Charles Connell, missing, probably drowned; W. F. Matteson, missing, probably drowned; B. W. Matteson, shot through both legs; G. R.
is now to be reversed by the bayonets of Tennesseeans, and the proud old Commonwealth reduced to the condition of a conquered province of that political Pandemonium called the Southern Confederacy. Those who have read the history and know the spirit of her people can have no fears as to the result of this audacious assault upon her honor and independence. The Government here will give all possible support to the State at the earliest moment practicable. Very sincerely yours, J. Holt. Gen. James speed, Frankfort, Ky. Washington, Sept. 12. dear sir: The late act of Congress providing for the confiscation of the estates of persons in open rebellion against the Government was, as a necessary war measure, accepted and fully approved by the loyal men of the country. It limited the penalty of confiscation to property actually employed in the service of the rebellion with the knowledge and consent of its owners, and, instead of emancipating slaves thus employed, left their status to
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 90. battle of Bolivar Heights, Va. Fought October 16, 1861. (search)
hich is always the case with this projectile, I need only remark that, with the same elevation, one shell struck half way up the mountain, the other clean over it. The leaden band would sometimes leave the projectile whole, and at others would fly off in small pieces — in one case not ten feet from the gun. You will at once see how little reliance can be placed on these shot and shell. In concluding this hastily written report, I have to remark that I fired thirty Hotchkiss shell and five James shell, a total of thirty-five rounds, and that we came off the field and arrived at this post with no damage to either men, horses, or pieces. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. W. Martin, Lieut. Commanding Sect. Battery K, Ninth Regiment N. Y. S. M. Washington Star account. On the morning of the 16th instant, at half-past 8 o'clock, Colonel John W. Geary, of the Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania regiment, and about four hundred men, composed of fraction
for the rebels. He was wounded in the hand, though it is supposed not seriously-sufficiently so, however, to prevent him from swimming to the island, in consequence of which he was doubtless taken prisoner. Company A.--Capt. H. Harrington commanding. Killed--Privates: Thomas Bailey, Thomas Dugan--2. Wounded--Sergeant Hugh Mills, Corporal Thomas Stephton. Privates: Michael Gilligan, Daniel Ferry--4. Missing--First Lieut. Samuel Giberson, Corporal Frank Hughes. Privates: Edward Flood, Thos. James, Jeremiah McCarthy, Geo. McClellan, Daniel Devlin, Geo. Sykes, James Connor, Edward Clary, James Douglas, John Wilson--12. The four men wounded reached camp, and are now under treatment. Their injuries are not of a permanent nature, and they will doubtless be again on active duty in a few weeks. Captain Harrington conducted himself, both on the battle-field and in the retreat, with great coolness and discretion. On seeing that he must either be killed or taken prisoner, he threw his s
he trees are torn and barked by balls, and many horses lie upon the ground, some torn open by shells and others riddled by balls. You can see innumerable stains of blood upon the ground. Where poor, gallant Armstrong was killed, there were eleven dead bodies. At the time of his death, he had a cap upon his sword waving it, rallying his men. My friend Captain Billy Jackson was shot in the hip while leading a portion of Russell's brigade. I think he will recover. I am afraid Jimmy Walker (James' son) will not recover. I think he is shot through the rectum. The day before the battle, Jackson, Major Butler, of the Eleventh Louisiana regiment, Wilson, of Watson's battery, Lieut. Ball, of same regiment, and Major Gus. Henry, and myself dined at Gen. Pillow's. Butler was shot through and died yesterday. Lieut. Ball was dangerously injured, and Henry had two horses shot under him. Jackson I have spoken of. I have given you but a poor account of what I saw, but I have not time to go
he trees are torn and barked by balls, and many horses lie upon the ground, some torn open by shells and others riddled by balls. You can see innumerable stains of blood upon the ground. Where poor, gallant Armstrong was killed, there were eleven dead bodies. At the time of his death, he had a cap upon his sword waving it, rallying his men. My friend Captain Billy Jackson was shot in the hip while leading a portion of Russell's brigade. I think he will recover. I am afraid Jimmy Walker (James' son) will not recover. I think he is shot through the rectum. The day before the battle, Jackson, Major Butler, of the Eleventh Louisiana regiment, Wilson, of Watson's battery, Lieut. Ball, of same regiment, and Major Gus. Henry, and myself dined at Gen. Pillow's. Butler was shot through and died yesterday. Lieut. Ball was dangerously injured, and Henry had two horses shot under him. Jackson I have spoken of. I have given you but a poor account of what I saw, but I have not time to go
Doc. 169. General Patterson's defence. The First Troop of Philadelphia (Pa.) City Cavalry dined together on Saturday, November 16th, at the Continental Hotel, to commemorate their foundation in 1775. Captain James presided, and Dr. Goddard, as Surgeon of the Troop, acted as vice-president. Among the guests were Major-Generals Patterson and Cadwalader. The dinner was altogether a delightful one. When the cloth was removed, the health of Major-General Patterson was proposed by Lieutenant A. K. Arnold, attached to the United States Cavalry, who was with the General during the whole campaign on the Potomac, and in response to an enthusiastic call, he made a speech. He returned thanks for the compliment paid him, and for the manner in which it had been received. He said that he was not in the habit of giving reasons for any thing he did or did not do, but in the presence of men of so much intelligence as the members of the First City Troop, a part of his command in the short cam
incendiary composition Third--That pieces of port fire are nearly useless as such incendiary composition. Fourth--That brick buildings covered with slate cannot be fired by either hot shot or shells at the distance named, unless by accident, unless the shells have rock-fires. Fifth--That the trouble and expense incurred in protecting forts by sand-bag traverses, etc., is far more than repaid by the saving of the lives of the defenders. Sixth--That no dependence is to be placed on James' rifle projectiles, either as it respects accuracy or range. If I had had guns to be depended on. I could have silenced the most of the enemy's sand-batteries and the guns in Barrancas. Seventh--That ships with their present armament cannot for an hour contend against rifled guns, and that if our navy is not at once supplied liberally with good rifled guns it will be very likely to be disgraced. Eighth--That on service here, and I believe the remark applies with equal force to every r
tes of merit for their bravery and gallantry. Ninth regiment.--Company A, private Alexander Smith; company B, private John Schmidt; company C, private William Ernest; company D, privates George Motor, Joshua McMasters, Wm. Ounthin, John Raymond, C. E. Patton, Wm. Lindsey, John F. Herron, corporal Pearsall; company F, privates Wm. Magill, John Hatch, Wm. Willison; company H, private Ed. Davis; company I, private John H. Weston. Sixth regiment.--Company C, privates H. Lathrop, W. H. Gayne, James Sunone; company F, private Wm. H. Densmore; company G, private Edgar Smith; company H, private Thomas Conway; company I, private Charles Weller; company K, privates George Brown, H. E. Dimander, corporal John M. Brown. In addition to the officers mentioned in the reports of commanders of regiments, I respectfully recommend that Colonel John S. McCalmont, (Tenth regiment Pennsylvania reserve corps;) Colonel C. F. Jackson, Ninth regiment, (same corps;) Colonel John H. Taggart, Twelfth regim
oats' crews from the Massachusetts, accompanied the expedition, which was a purely naval enterprise, the whole being under command of Commander Melancton Smith, of the Massachusetts. The Lewis was formerly employed as a freight and passenger boat between New Orleans and Mobile, and, since her capture by the New London, has been fitted up as a gunboat. She carries a crew of one hundred men, and her armament consists of one twenty-pound Parrott gun, rifled, two twelve-pound rifled guns for James' projectiles, one twenty-four-pound Dahlgren howitzer, and two twelve-pound howitzers. She is a lofty steamer, and offers altogether too prominent a mark for the enemy. Being of light draught, however, she can approach nearer the track usually taken by the gunboats and steamers of the enemy. The expedition got under way at seven o'clock on the morning of the 31st ult., and steamed across the Mississippi Sound toward Biloxi. The weather was fine, and every thing bid fair for a brush wit
1 2