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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 135 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 117 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 63 1 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 1, April, 1902 - January, 1903 59 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 53 9 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 50 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 38 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 33 13 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 3 Browse Search
John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for James or search for James in all documents.

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ore their broken ranks, or, failing in that, to share their fate because of what they had done hitherto. About this time Colonel Wood, my chief commissary, arrived from the front and gave me fuller intelligence, reporting that everything was gone, my headquarters captured, and the troops dispersed. When I heard this I took two of my aides-de-camp, Major George A. Forsyth and Captain Joseph O'Keefe, and with twenty men from the escort started for the front, at the same time directing Colonel James W. Forsyth and Colonels Alexander and Thom to remain behind and do what they could to stop the runaways. For a short distance I traveled on the road, but soon found it so blocked with wagons and wounded men that my progress was impeded, and I was forced to take to the adjoining fields to make haste. When most of the wagons and wounded were past I returned to the road, which was thickly lined with unhurt men, who, having got far enough to the rear to be out of danger, had halted, w
way of reorganizing the civil affairs of the State. I was also satisfied that he was unfit to retain the place, sine he was availing himself of every opportunity to work political ends beneficial to himself. In this instance Wells protested to me against his removal, and also appealed to the President for an opinion of the Attorney-General as to my power in the case; and doubtless he would have succeeded in retaining his office, but for the fact that the President had been informed by General James B. Steadman New Orleans, June 19, 1867. Andrew Johnson, President United States, Washington City: Lewis D. Campbell leaves New Orleans for home this evening. Want of re- spect for Governor Wells personally, alone represses the expression of indigna- tion felt by all honest and sensible men at the unwarranted usurpation of General Sheridan in removing the civil officers of Louisiana. It is believed here that you will reinstate Wells. He is a bad man, and has no influence.